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Humane Society: Protect pets as temperatures rise

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Humane Society: Protect pets as temperatures rise

The St. Louis Humane Society is asking pet owners to pay attention as temperatures are climb into the 90s for the next week. “Pets left in parked cars or taken along for a run, bike or rollerblade ride can quickly be at risk for serious injury or even death,” warns Missouri’s Animal Medical Center of Mid-America. […]

Humane Society: Protect pets as temperatures rise

The St. Louis Humane Society is asking pet owners to pay attention as temperatures are climb into the 90s for the next week.

dog-juneau1“Pets left in parked cars or taken along for a run, bike or rollerblade ride can quickly be at risk for serious injury or even death,” warns Missouri’s Animal Medical Center of Mid-America.

The center says an easy rule to remember is “70 degrees and over, don’t take Rover!”

They’re also asking anyone who sees an animal in heat-related danger to call the Humane Society of Missouri Animal Cruelty Hotline at (314) 647-4400.

Here are pet safety tips from the Humane Society of Missouri for active pet families in the summertime:

  • Never leave a pet unattended in a parked car when the temperature is above 70 degrees. In just minutes, the temperature inside the car can reach more than 100 degrees, regardless of whether a window is cracked. Leaving a pet in a hot, unattended car is inhumane and can cause severe injury or death within minutes. Harming a pet in this way is illegal, punishable by fines and imprisonment.
  • Act immediately if you see a distressed animal in an unattended car. Call the local police and the Humane Society of Missouri Animal Cruelty Hotline at (314) 647-4400. A pet showing signs of distress such as heavy panting, unresponsive behavior, seizure or collapse needs immediate attention.
  • Take frequent breaks if walking or jogging with your dog and find patches of grass to rest. Dogs can make great fitness buddies, but asphalt and concrete get hot quickly. Heat rises from the ground, and dogs absorb and release heat through their paws.
  • NEVER bicycle or rollerblade with a pet. Heat stroke and possible death can occur very quickly, particularly in hot weather. Pets will do everything they can to keep up with their humans, causing a pet to be injured or suffer from heat stroke.
  • Immediately apply cool water to your pet’s paws and stomach if it is showing signs of heat exhaustion (excessive panting, vomiting, lethargic behavior), and see your veterinarian promptly.
  • Keep pets inside your home where it’s cool. Never leave pets stranded in the scorching sun, even if they typically stay outdoors. Provide plenty of shade all day and fresh, clean water at all times in a plastic (never metal) bowl secured to the ground to prevent accidental spills.
  • Protect your pet against fleas, ticks and mosquitoes, which are more prevalent during warm weather. Have them tested by a veterinarian for heartworm disease (mosquito-transmitted) and use heartworm prevention medication.
  • Avoid shaving a dog’s coat. A pet’s coat is designed by nature to keep it cool during the summer.Their fur also prevents sunburns. Giving long-haired dogs a trim is okay, but never shave them completely.

For more information on how to care for pets during in hot weather, or to download a hot weather flyer, poster and/or video, visit www.hsmo.org or email info@hsmo.org.

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