Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 

 

ROLLA, Mo. (AP) — A U.S. Army sergeant killed in last week's shooting in Fort Hood, Texas, has been buried in the Missouri town where he went to high school and met his wife.

Sergeant Timothy Owens was originally from Effingham, Illinois. He was one of three soldiers killed April 2nd when a gunman fired on the military base. Sixteen others were wounded.

Saturday's funeral was in Rolla (RAH'-lah) where Owens lived in the 1990s.

The Rolla Daily News reported that as many as 75 motorcyclists from the Rolla Patriot Guard Riders accompanied the casket before the service at Rolla's First Baptist Church and afterward, to Lake Springs Cemetery in rural Dent County.

As the casket left the church, Patriot Guard Riders, law enforcement officers and residents lined the sidewalk outside and saluted.

Published in Local News
FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — A soldier opened fire Wednesday on fellow service members at the Fort Hood military base, killing three people and wounding 16 before committing suicide at the same post where more than a dozen people were slain in a 2009 attack, authorities said.
 
The shooter apparently walked into a building and began firing a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued firing before entering another building and kept shooting.
 
He was eventually confronted by military police in a parking lot. As he came within 20 feet of an officer, the gunman put his hands up but then reached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The officer drew her own weapon, and the suspect put his gun to his head and pulled the trigger a final time, according to Lt. Gen. Mark A. Milley, senior officer on the base.
 
The gunman, who served in Iraq for four months in 2011, had sought help for depression, anxiety and other problems. Before the attack, he had been undergoing an assessment to determine whether he had post-traumatic stress disorder, Milley said.
 
The married suspect had arrived at Fort Hood in February from another base. He was taking medication, and there were reports that he had complained after returning from Iraq about suffering a traumatic brain injury, Milley said. The commander did not elaborate.
 
The gunman was never wounded in action, according to military records, Milley said.
 
There was no indication the attack was related to terrorism, Milley said.
 
The military declined to identify the gunman until his family members had been notified. Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said the suspect was named Ivan Lopez but offered no other details.
 
The gunman's weapon had been purchased recently in the local area and was not registered to be on the base, Milley said.
 
Late Wednesday, investigators had already started looking into whether his combat experience caused lingering psychological trauma. Among the possibilities they planned to explore was whether a fight or argument on base triggered the attack.
 
"We have to find all those witnesses, the witnesses to every one of those shootings, and find out what his actions were, and what was said to the victims," said a federal law enforcement official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case by name.
 
The official said authorities would begin by speaking with Lopez's wife and expected to search his home and any computers he owned.
 
The injured were taken to the base hospital and other local hospitals. At least three of the nine patients at Scott and White Hospital in Temple were listed in critical condition.
 
Wednesday's attack immediately revived memories of the shocking 2009 assault on Fort Hood, which was the deadliest attack on a domestic military installation in U.S. history. Thirteen people were killed and more than 30 wounded.
 
Until an all-clear siren sounded hours after Wednesday's shooting began, relatives of soldiers waited anxiously for news about their loved ones.
 
"The last two hours have been the most nerve-wracking I've ever felt," said Tayra DeHart, 33, who had earlier heard from her husband that he was safe but was waiting to hear from him again.
 
Brooke Conover, whose husband was on base at the time of the shooting, said she found out about it while checking Facebook. She immediately called her husband, Staff Sgt. Sean Conover.
 
"I just want him to come home," Conover said.
 
President Barack Obama vowed that investigators would get to the bottom of the shooting.
 
In a hastily arranged statement in Chicago, Obama reflected on the sacrifices that troops stationed at Fort Hood have made — including enduring multiple tours to Iraq and Afghanistan.
 
"They serve with valor. They serve with distinction, and when they're at their home base, they need to feel safe," Obama said. "We don't yet know what happened tonight, but obviously that sense of safety has been broken once again."
 
The president spoke in the same room of a steakhouse where he had just met with about 25 donors at a previously scheduled fundraiser for the Democratic National Committee.
 
The November 2009 attack happened inside a crowded building where soldiers were waiting to get vaccines and routine paperwork after recently returning from deployments or preparing to go to Afghanistan and Iraq.
 
Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan was convicted and sentenced to death last year in that mass shooting. He said he acted to protect Islamic insurgents abroad from American aggression.
 
According to testimony during Hasan's trial last August, Hasan walked inside carrying two weapons and several loaded magazines, shouted "Allahu Akbar!" — Arabic for "God is great!" — and opened fire with a handgun.
 
The rampage ended when Hasan was shot in the back by Fort Hood police officers. He was paralyzed from the waist down and is now on death row at the military prison at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas.
 
After that shooting, the military tightened security at bases nationwide. Those measures included issuing security personnel long-barreled weapons, adding an insider-attack scenario to their training and strengthening ties to local law enforcement. The military also joined an FBI intelligence-sharing program aimed at identifying terror threats.
 
In September, a former Navy man opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard, leaving 13 people dead, including the gunman. After that shooting, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the Pentagon to review security at all U.S. defense installations worldwide and examine the granting of security clearances that allow access to them.
 
Asked Wednesday about security improvements in the wake of the shootings, Hagel said, "Obviously when we have these kinds of tragedies on our bases, something's not working."
Published in National News

   FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) - A military jury has sentenced Maj. Nidal Hasan to death for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, giving the Army psychiatrist what he believed would be a path to martyrdom in the attack on unarmed fellow soldiers.

   The American-born Muslim, who has said he acted to protect Islamic insurgents abroad from American aggression, never denied being the gunman. In opening statements, he acknowledged to the jury that he pulled the trigger in a crowded waiting room where troops were getting final medical checkups before deploying to Iraq and Afghanistan.

   Hasan could become the first American soldier executed in more than half a century once automatic appeals are exhausted. But the lead prosecutor assured jurors that Hasan would "never be a martyr" despite his attempt to tie the attack to his Islamic faith.

   Gale Hunt, whose son was killed in the shooting, told reporters, "Anyone who would use their religion to commit acts of terrorism serves no god except their own hatred and self-interest."

Published in National News

FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) - The Army psychiatrist on trial for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood says the deadly attack was provoked by American soldiers being deployed to "engage in an illegal war."

Maj. Nidal Hasan told a military judge on Wednesday that the shooting wasn't in the heat of passion. He says jurors shouldn't have the option of convicting him of voluntary manslaughter.

Hasan is accused of killing 13 people and wounding more than 30 others at the Texas Army post in the deadliest mass shooting ever on a U.S. military base. If convicted, he could face the death penalty.

Hasan is acting as his own attorney, and his statements marked one of the rare moments that he's spoken during the 12-day trial.

Jurors were not in the courtroom at the time.

Published in National News

FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) - A witness to the 2009 Fort Hood shootings says she had to quickly decide who she could save, so she used a black marker to write a "D" on the foreheads of the victims she couldn't.

Sgt. 1st Class Maria Guerra recalled those moments while testifying Thursday at the trial of Maj. Nidal Hasan. He's accused of killing 13 people and wounding 32 others that day at the Texas military base.

Hasan is acting as his own attorney. He raised a rare objection when Guerras said she heard the gunman silence a woman who was yelling, "My baby!" Hasan asked the judge to remind Guerra she was under oath.

Guerra said she didn't want to change her testimony.

Hasan challenged no other witnesses and said little during the trial.

Published in National News
Wednesday, 12 June 2013 16:22

Fort Hood soldier accused of paying for sex

FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) - Authorities have charged a Fort Hood sergeant with paying for sex with a soldier in a prostitution scheme allegedly arranged by a coordinator of the Texas Army post's sexual assault prevention program.

 

   Master Sgt. Brad Grimes was charged in military court Wednesday with patronizing a prostitute, conspiring with another soldier to patronize a prostitute, committing adultery and solicitation to commit adultery.

   The woman soldier hasn't been charged.

 

   Fort Hood spokesman Chris Haug says the charges stem from an investigation of a lower-level coordinator of Fort Hood's sexual assault and harassment prevention program.

   In May, the Army said that coordinator is accused of sexual assault and possibly arranging for at least one woman to have sex for money. That soldier is a sergeant first class who hasn't been charged.

Published in National News

   FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — A judge was to decide today whether to delay the Fort Hood shooting suspect's trial three months so he can have more time to prepare.

   Maj. Nidal Hasan requested the delay after the judge ruled that he can represent himself. But Col. Tara Osborn, the judge, scolded him Monday, reminding him that he previously said he wouldn't need extra time. Jury selection is still set for Wednesday.

   Hasan faces the death penalty or life without parole if convicted of 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder in the 2009 attack on the Texas Army post.

   Some wounded soldiers say they're angry that Hasan will be allowed to approach and question them.

   Retired Staff Sgt. Shawn Manning says testifying will be more difficult but he's prepared.

Published in National News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
Health registry could be created under bill on Nixon's desl

Health registry could be created under bill on Nixon's …

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - County officials could compile lists of residents with health problems under a Missouri bill intended to identify people in need of help during disast...

Texas man charged for hitting cyclist while driving dru…

ST. CHARLES, MO (AP) – A Texas man faces second-degree assault charges after allegedly striking a bicyclist while driving drunk.   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch repor...

Rauner skips GOP event over pastor's comments

Rauner skips GOP event over pastor's comments

MOLINE, Ill. (AP) - GOP gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner (ROW'-nur) isn't attending a Republican dinner in Moline because he says he disagrees with past statements from a pa...

Mizzou journalism school trying to roll out journalism drones again

Mizzou journalism school trying to roll out journalism …

COLUMBIA, MO (AP) – The University of Missouri journalism school has modified its classroom use of aerial drones as a legal challenge to the FAA ban on commercial use of the fly...

Lawmakers approve changes to Missouri criminal code

Lawmakers approve changes to Missouri criminal code

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers gave final approval to the first comprehensive rewrite of the state's criminal laws in decades.   The House and Senate...

Craig Michael Wood pleads not guilty

Craig Michael Wood pleads not guilty

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) - A southwest Missouri youth football coach accused of kidnapping, raping and killing a 10-year-old girl has pleaded not guilty   Forty-six-ye...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved