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   SPRINGFIELD, IL (AP) - Once again Illinois lawmakers are considering a list of tax breaks and other incentives to keep some companies in the state and attract others.

   The most widely publicized proposal is a $24 million tax break aimed at persuading Archer Daniels Midland Company to keep its new global headquarters in Illinois.

   Legislators at this week's fall session in Springfield also could be asked for a tax break to retain the company that emerges from a merger between OfficeMax Inc. of Naperville and Office Depot Inc., among others.

   Some lawmakers say the state's bad finances make timing difficult for new such breaks.

   Others say the state needs to take a harder look and adopt a more comprehensive way to scrutinize such incentives in the future.

 
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 10 September 2013 14:17

Governor Nixon speaks on veto session

One day ahead of the all-important veto session in Jefferson City, Governor Jay Nixon made a stop in the St. Louis area. Nixon spoke in front of the student body at Affton High School, congratulating them on their continued academic achievement.

After his speech, Nixon was asked his thoughts on the republican legislature's attempts to override his tax-cut and gun nullifacation vetoes.

"We're not in junior high here. This is serious business," said Nixon. "I don't look at it as a scoreboard, I look at the substance of the bills. This isn't about some sort of a back and forth, this is about what we should responsibly do as a state."

Nixon vetoed a total of 29 bills. The GOP supermajority in the legislature aims to override as many as possible. 

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri General Assembly has officially come to a close.

House and Senate leaders gaveled the annual session to an end Thursday in compliance with the adjournment date set in the Missouri Constitution.

The actual work ended two weeks ago. The constitution prohibited lawmakers from passing any legislation after May 17, but allowed additional time for bills to be printed and prepared for delivery to the governor.

On Thursday, the House speaker and Senate president pro tem signed bills as a verification that they had passed.

Gov. Jay Nixon now has until mid-July to decide whether to sign those bills into law or veto them.

Published in Local News

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