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A gunman wearing an Afghan police uniform opened fire at a police training facility in eastern Afghanistan today, killing at least two American troops and three Afghans, officials say.

The shooting took place while the troops were visiting the facility to help train the Afghans, a key part of the U.S. handover strategy before combat troops leave in 2014. According to coalition officials, the shooting also left several wounded.

A joint U.S.-Afghan team is investigating the shooting.

This latest insider attack in Wardak, a restive province in the country's east, comes one day after a deadline set by Afghan President Hamid Karzai for all U.S. Special Forces to leave the province. Karzai set the deadline two weeks ago, after accusing Afghans who work for U.S. Special Forces of harassing, torturing and murdering innocent civilians.

The attack also comes just a day after new U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel's trip to Afghanistan, one marred by controversy.

Osama bin Laden's Son-in-Law Pleads Not Guilty in NYC Court Watch Video On Saturday, a suicide bomber on a bicycle struck just outside the Afghan Ministry of Defense, one of the most heavily fortified buildings in the country. At least nine Afghan civilians were killed. Though Hagel was in a meeting at a coalition military base at the time and never in any danger, nearby bases were put into lockdown, and reporters travelling with Hagel's press pool were ushered into a safe room in the basement of the base they were on.

Then on Sunday, Karzai implied the Taliban were serving U.S. interests by creating instability in Afghanistan. The inflammatory comments were made during a nationally televised speech.

Referring to recent insurgent attacks, including the one outside the Ministry of Defense, Karzai said the attacks were "not aimed at showing their strength to the USA, but to serve the USA.

"In fact, yesterday's bombings in the name of the Taliban were aimed at serving the foreigners and supporting the presence of the foreigners in Afghanistan and keeping them in Afghanistan, by intimidating us," Karzai said.

The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, Gen. Joseph Dunford, quickly rejected the comments, calling them "categorically false."

"We have fought too hard over the past 12 years, we have shed too much blood over the last 12 years, to ever think that violence or instability would be to our advantage," Dunford said.

Later that evening, Hagel cancelled a scheduled joint press conference with Karzai. A spokesperson cited security concerns, though a Karzai spokesperson said it was due to "scheduling pressures." The two still held a private dinner meeting with Dunford in attendance, but the cancellation of the joint press conference was widely seen as a snub to Karzai in response to his inflammatory remarks.
(ABC NEWS) Before the 115 cardinal electors file into the Sistine Chapel for the conclave to choose the next pope, technicians will pull up the floorboards to install cell phone jamming devices.

Once there, the doors will be locked and the participants will have no newspapers, television or, for the social media savvy set, Twitter. They'll get virtually nothing from the outside, other than food.

"It is the way of ensuring that the voice speaking to the cardinals during the conclave belongs to the Holy Spirit and no one else," said ABC News Vatican consultant Father John Wauck.

The ritualistic conclave involves centuries-old customs that have changed very little over time.

The tradition of locking the doors dates back to 1274, when the cardinals met in the remote village of Viterbo.

Two years and eight months into the longest conclave ever, frustrated townspeople tried everything to motivate a quicker decision. They locked the cardinals inside and resorted to more extreme measures, trying to starve them out and tearing the roof off the building to expose them to the elements.

2013 Conclave

The cardinal electors in the upcoming conclave will be much more comfortable, surrounded by Michelangelo's frescoes in the Sistine Chapel.

A date for the secret event, which literally means "with key," won't be set until the cardinals convene on March 4, a Vatican spokesman said.

Pope Benedict decreed a conclave could be held as soon as all voting cardinals are present. All cardinals under 80 when the papacy is vacated are eligible to participate.

While campaigning is forbidden inside the Sistine Chapel, experts say there is plenty of politicking in the days before.

"This is schmoozing at the highest level," said Christopher Bellitto, a professor at Kean University in New Jersey who has written nine books on the history of the church.

More than half of the cardinal electors were appointed by Benedict, and many are using the days before the conclave to get to know each other and feel out the general sentiment, Bellitto said.

"I think each cardinal has a list of a dozen people in his head. He may know some very well, some by reputation," Bellitto said. "If the cardinals don't know someone, they may ask someone they trust [their opinion]."

On the day the conclave begins, the cardinal electors will attend mass before filing into the Sistine Chapel. For one of the 115, it will likely be his last time wearing a red hat. The cardinal electors have a history of elevating one of their own to the papacy, so that lucky choice will exchange it for the pope's traditional white.

Once inside the Sistine Chapel, the cardinals will take an oath of secrecy and then be given rectangular ballots with the words "Eligo in Summum Pontificem" written on them, meaning, "I elect as supreme pontiff."

Each voting cardinal writes the name of his choice for pope on the ballot and is asked to disguise his handwriting to avoid letting others know who is supporting whom.

Three scrutineers count the ballots, and if no one receives the required two-thirds majority, the votes are burned. A black smoke signal will signal to the world the vote was inconclusive.

Damp straw was once used to turn the smoke black, Bellitto said, however after years of confusion, dye has reportedly been used.

There can be a maximum of four ballots in a single day, and if after three days the cardinals still haven't selected a pope, the voting sessions can be suspended for a day of prayer and discussion.

Throughout the secret process, the cardinals will eat and sleep in a private guest house on the edge of Vatican City.

Only a select staff of doctors, cooks and housekeepers, all sworn to secrecy, are allowed to interact with the cardinals.

For approximately half of the cardinal electors, this will be their second time participating in the mystical event.

Cardinal William Levada of San Francisco, a first-timer, said his colleagues in the college of cardinals have given him an idea of what to expect.

"I think it is a prayerful atmosphere," he said. "No campaigning. It is forbidden to campaign there. You can't put yourself forward."

Habemus Papem: We Have A Pope!

The first sign that the 1.2 billion Catholics worldwide have a pope will come when white smoke curls out of the Sistine Chapel's chimney.

Inside the chapel, the man who is chosen to be pope will be asked by the cardinal dean if he accepts. If so, he will be asked for his papal name.

"Generally, the way it works is there is some level of affection toward a certain name," Bellitto said.

At his first general audience as pope, Benedict XVI said he chose the name to "create a spirutual bond with Benedict XV, who steered the church through the period of turmoil caused by the First World War," and also cited his fondness for the Benedictine Order as an influence.

The newly elected pontiff wiill be fitted with the papal vestments before making his way to St. Peter's Basilica, his identity still unknown to the world.

French Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, the senior cardinal in the order of the deacons, will step onto the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica to tell the world the name of the man chosen as the next pontiff.

Tauran is expected to make the announcement unless he is chosen pope, in which case another cardinal would deliver the news.

The new pope will then step onto the balcony and greet the world for the first time.

However, the secrets of the conclave that elevated him to the position will be forever be kept among one of the world's most exclusive clubs.

By DAVID WRIGHT (@abcdavid) and ALYSSA NEWCOMB (@alyssanewcomb) March 11, 2013
COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - Hundreds of University of Missouri students are signing a petition asking administrators to reconsider a plan to move the spring honors graduation ceremony from historic Francis Quadrangle to Mizzou Arena.

School officials say there's no longer enough room on the quad.

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