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Colin Jeffery

Colin Jeffery

DICK THIEN, A FOUNDING EDITOR OF USA TODAY, DIES

Monday, 26 August 2013 12:15 Published in Local News

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Richard "Dick" Thien, a veteran journalist who played a pivotal role in developing USA Today for Gannett Co. Inc., has died. He was 73.

Thien died Friday of natural causes at Missouri Baptist Hospital in suburban St. Louis, his son, Mark Thien, said Monday. Thien was a two-time cancer survivor.

In 1981, Gannett's CEO, Al Neuharth, chose Thien to be one of five prototype editors for USA Today, the nation's first national general-interest newspaper that made its debut the following year. USA Today immediately made a splash with its colorful look, frequent use of graphics and shorter, tighter stories, setting a trend followed by many newspapers around the world.

Thien was described in the book "The Making of McPaper: The Inside Story of USA Today," as "a gruff, cigar-chewing type who barked like an old-time city editor."

The Associated Press named Thien one of the 12 best editors in the country in 1986. It was among many awards he won in a career that spanned more than four decades.

Thien grew up in St. Louis and graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism in 1963.

He worked at newspapers in several states and was a longtime coach in the Chips Quinn Scholar program for young minority journalists. He also taught journalism at the State University of New York in Binghamton, the University of Kansas and at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he earned a master's degree in journalism in 1998.

Thien was a first lieutenant in the Army in the 1960s.

Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Elaine, three children and three grandchildren. A funeral service is Friday at Kutis Affton Chapel in suburban St. Louis.

 

Top lawmakers call for military action in Syria

Sunday, 25 August 2013 09:26 Published in National News

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two top lawmakers are calling for an immediate U.S. military response to the Syria's suspected chemical weapons attack that killed at least a hundred civilians last week.

Republican Sen. Bob Corker is calling for the U.S. to respond in a "surgical and proportional way, something that gets their attention." The Tennessee lawmaker says such a response should not involve U.S. troops on the ground, however.

Democrat Rep. Eliot Engel of New York says the U.S. must respond "quickly," together with NATO allies, possibly using cruise missile strikes, as the U.S. and NATO did in Libya.

A senior administration official said Sunday there is "very little doubt" a chemical weapon was used, but added the president had not yet decided how to respond.

Corker and Engel appeared on "Fox News Sunday."

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Hundreds of lobbyists in at least 20 states get public pensions because they represent associations of counties, cities and school boards.

Legislatures granted them access decades ago on the premise that they serve governments and the public. In many cases, such access also includes state health care benefits.

But several states have started to question whether these organizations should get such benefits, since they are private entities in most respects: They face no public oversight, can pay their top executives private-sector salaries and sometimes lobby for positions in conflict with taxpayers.

New Jersey and Illinois are among the states considering legislation that would end their inclusion.

But such groups argue that they are entitled to public pensions because they give a voice to government entities that serve taxpayers.

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