Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

Study: Waivers leave behind at-risk students

Tuesday, 27 August 2013 00:19 Published in National News

   WASHINGTON (AP) - Millions of at-risk students could fall through the cracks as the Education Department gives states permission to ignore parts of No Child Left Behind, according to a study education advocates released Tuesday.

   The Education Department has been giving states waivers from the education law's requirements, including those to collect and publish data about students from poor families, students whose native language is not English, those with learning disabilities and minority students. The resulting patchwork of rules - from Miami to Seattle - has given states more freedom to implement plans to boost education but has allowed almost 2,300 schools to shed their label of seriously troubled, according to numbers compiled at the Campaign for High School Equity.

   "It appears to us that waivers could lead to fewer students of color receiving the support they need," said Rufina Hernandez, executive director for the Campaign for High School Equity.

   Her coalition of education reformers, civil rights activists and policy analysts studied the 34 states and the District of Columbia that had received waivers from No Child Left Behind before April. (Another six states and a collection of individual districts in California have won waivers since then.)

   The results show students who are at the highest risk of dropping out are often no longer tracked as carefully as they were before Education Secretary Arne Duncan began exempting states from some requirements if they promised to better prepare their students for college or careers.

   The Education Department had no immediate reaction to the study but Duncan has been vocal in calling for a rewrite of No Child Left Behind that would render his waivers moot.

   Under the original No Child Left Behind, schools that failed to teach at-risk students would be flagged if one group wasn't keeping pace. If one of the subgroups failed to meet its performance targets for two consecutive years, officials were required to stage an intervention to turn the entire school around.

   But the advocates' review finds those in-depth reporting requirements have fallen by the wayside under the waivers. An intervention is no longer automatically triggered in as many as 19 states, meaning those efforts that once were at the center of the law are now optional. In 16 states, student groups are lumped together and treated as one bloc of at-risk pupils, essentially scrapping the reporting of at-risk groups by label.

   The waivers make it easier to mask stumbles.

   "The No Child Left Behind system itself was far from perfect," said Phillip Lovell, vice president for federal advocacy with the Alliance for Excellent Education. "Where is succeeded was shining the spotlight on the subgroups."

   That spotlight now has dimmed, he said.

   Take, for instance, Ohio. In that state, 856 schools failed to meet their performance benchmarks for at-risk students two years in a row. Under the waiver Duncan approved, the number of schools called troubled schools fell to 445. Of that smaller sum, only 162 schools were deemed an urgent priority.

   That's not necessarily a bad thing, said Mike Petrilli, who has studied No Child Left Behind as a leader of the reform-minded Fordham Institute.

   "The waivers allow states to prioritize. We should be saving the toughest interventions for schools that have low proficiency and low progress," said Petrilli, a former official at the Education Department. "The spirit of the law is to make sure that kids don't get left behind."

   In all, 2,292 schools nationwide were deemed no longer needing special attention for improvement in states operating under waivers.

   Duncan's department can adjust this, though, when states return to the Education Department seeking to continue running their schools outside of No Child Left Behind's rules. Duncan's hall passes only last one year and states face the threat of returning to No Child Left Behind's requirements if they don't execute their improvements plans.

   "They can get stricter to make sure the accountability happens in states and trigger the interventions that were in place under No Child Left Behind," Hernandez said.

   In 2011, the Education Department announced that states could petition Duncan for waivers from No Child Left Behind's ambitious requirements, such as having all students read and count at grade level by 2014 or else risk their federal funding.

   In most cases, Duncan has agreed to their requests in exchange for promised improvements. Illinois, Iowa, Texas and Wyoming are still waiting for Duncan's verdict for their applications.

   Duncan had hoped the specter of waivers would compel Congress to update No Child Left Behind, which expired in 2007 without renewal.

   "The same year that No Child Left Behind came out, the iPod came out," Petrilli said. "We're still on No Child Left Behind, version 1.0, and we've had new versions of the iPod, iPhone, iPad."

   Various rewrites of the law have been discussed but none has made its way to the White House for a president's signature. The Republican-led House has passed a version; a rewrite has been completed in the Senate education panel but no vote of the full body has been scheduled.

   "NCLB is six years overdue for an update, and nearly all agree that it should be replaced with a law that gives systems and educators greater freedom while continuing to fulfill the law's original promise," Duncan wrote in Sunday's Washington Post.

   "In the months ahead, I will ask Congress to listen to those doing the real work of education change," he added.

 

   There's good news for drivers in north county.  Missouri transportation officials report that all lanes of westbound I-270 have reopened after a broken water main had shut it down for several hours.  

   Just before 10 o'clock Monday night police closed westbound I-270 because of the broken main at Old Halls Ferry.  The closure caused traffic to back up all the way into Illinois.  

   By 1 a.m. Tuesday, one lane had reopened.  

   At about 2:30 Tuesday morning, MoDOT reported that all lanes had reopened.

Syria's Assad: We did not use chemical weapons

Monday, 26 August 2013 03:37 Published in National News

   MOSCOW (AP) — Syrian President Bashar Assad said his troops did not use chemical weapons in an attack on a rebel-held suburb in a Damascus last week where hundreds of people died.

   The United States have said that there is little doubt that Assad's regime was responsible for the attack on Aug. 21 in the capital's eastern suburbs. Anti-government activists and Doctors Without Borders say that more than 300 people were killed in an artillery barrage by regime forces Wednesday that included the use of toxic gas.

   Assad told Russia's Izvestia daily that the accusations that his troops were responsible were "politically motivated."

   "This is nonsense," Assad was quoted as saying in an interview published Monday. "First they level the accusations, and only then they start collecting evidence."

   Assad said that attacking such an area with chemical weapons would not make sense for the government as there was no clear front line between regime and rebel forces.

   "How can the government use chemical weapons, or any other weapons of mass destruction, in an area where its troops are situated?" he said. "This is not logical. That's why these accusations are politically motivated, and a recent string of victories of the government forces is the reason for it."

   Syria said Sunday that a U.N. team could investigate the site but a senior White House official dismissed the deal as "too late to be credible."

   With France, Britain, Israel and some U.S. congressmen urging swift military action against Assad's regime if the use of chemical agents is confirmed, the U.N. team's conclusions could have a dramatic impact on the trajectory of the country's civil war.

   French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said no decision had been made on a military intervention but that any response would be "proportionate."

   "It will be negotiated in coming days," Fabius told Europe 1 radio on Monday. He said that the lack of a U.N. blessing was problematic, but that all options remain on the table.

   "The only option that I can't imagine would be to do nothing," Fabius said.

   Russia, who has been a staunch ally of Syria, said last week that the accusations against Assad could be a bid to get the Security Council to stand by the opposition, and to undermine efforts to resolve the conflict by convening a peace conference in Geneva.

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

Missouri Criminal Code Subject To Overhaul

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers are poised to send Gov. Jay Nixon legislation to overhaul the state's criminal laws. House Majority Leader John Diehl says the ...

Missouri House Will Debate Student Transfer Program

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri House members plan to advance legislation that seeks to address a student transfer law requiring unaccredited school systems to pay for stude...

Kraft Recalls Oscar Mayer Wieners

Kraft Foods is recalling approximately 96,000 pounds of Oscar Mayer Classic Wieners because the products may contain Classic Cheese Dogs in the Classic Wieners’ packages. Th...

Cards defense, bullpen falter in 3-2 loss to Nats

Cards defense, bullpen falter in 3-2 loss to Nats

  WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Cardinals managed to score twice against Stephen Strasburg while starter Shelby Miller kept the Nationals offense quiet. Nine outs away from ta...

Probe could complicate Rick Perry's prospect

Probe could complicate Rick Perry's prospect

  AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Rick Perry has spent a record 14 years in office vanquishing nearly all who dared confront him. But with eight months left on the ...

Star sea lion at the St. Louis Zoo has died

Star sea lion at the St. Louis Zoo has died

  ST. LOUIS (AP) — A star sea lion at the St. Louis Zoo has died. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Bennie the sea lion died Friday. He was 11. Zoo spoke...

Ride-sharing service hits snags in St. Louis

Ride-sharing service hits snags in St. Louis

  ST. LOUIS (AP) — A smartphone app-based ride-sharing service has started service in St. Louis, ignoring a cease and desist order from the city's taxi commission. ...

Missouri Republicans outline new gun proposal

Missouri Republicans outline new gun proposal

  JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Republicans have outlined a new approach to prevent federal agents from enforcing gun control laws the state considers to be infri...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved