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ST. LOUIS (AP) -- A walk down the 6-mile city street named for the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. yields plenty of images that would surely unsettle the civil rights leader: shuttered storefronts, open-air drug markets and a glut of pawn shops, quickie check-cashing providers and liquor stores.

The urban decay along Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in St. Louis can be found in other major American cities, from Houston and Milwaukee to the nation's capital.

"It's a national problem," said Melvin White, a 46-year-old postal worker in St. Louis and founder of a 3-year-old nonprofit group that is trying to restore King's legacy on asphalt. "Dr. King would be turning over in his grave."

Nearly three decades into the observance of Monday's federal holiday, the continuing decline of the most visible symbols of King's work has White and others calling for a renewed commitment to the more than 900 streets nationwide named in the Atlanta native's honor. The effort centers in St. Louis, where the small nonprofit is working to reclaim MLK roadways as a source of pride and inspiration, not disappointment over a dream derailed.

White's goals are ambitious, his resources admittedly modest. A neighborhood park is planned across the street from the group's headquarters. An urban agriculture project to encourage residents to eat healthy and grow their own food has preliminary support from nearby Washington University, one of the country's wealthiest private colleges. Above all, Beloved Streets of America wants to build community from the ashes of what was once a thriving retail corridor when White was a child.

The template can be found just a mile away. Delmar Boulevard, which saw a similar decline, is now a vibrant retail corridor packed with restaurants, nightclubs, a renovated movie theater and a boutique hotel. The renaissance earned Delmar recognition in 2007 as one of "10 Great Streets in America" by the American Planning Association.

Journalist Jonathan Tilove, who wrote a 2003 book based on visits to 650 King streets nationwide, called the King byways "black America's Main Street."

"Map them and you map a nation within a nation, a place where white America seldom goes and black America can be itself," he wrote. "It is a parallel universe with a different center of gravity and distinctive sensibilities. ... There is no other street like it."

But while streets named for King undoubtedly resonate widely in the black community, a University of Tennessee geography professor whose research explores the cultural and political significance of such streets said the compromised condition of streets named for King in St. Louis and other cities deserves broader attention.

"In some ways we racially profile these streets," said Derek Alderman, author of a 2007 study that found a smaller disparity among MLK-named streets and other "main streets" than is popularly portrayed. "We need to move beyond those images and see what concrete lives and realities are living on those streets."

More than 50 years after King led his march on Washington, communities large and small still debate whether to rename local streets in his honor. In Harrisonburg, Va., city leaders recently agreed to rename a street for King over protests by some residents. A similar debate continues in High Point, N.C., where a King street proposal first suggested two decades ago remains up in the air.

Other cities have had more success in balancing the desire to commemorate King without superseding local tradition. Alderman singled out Chapel Hill, N.C., which in 2005 renamed a major thoroughfare that abuts the University of North Carolina campus. Street signs that identify Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard also include the name "Historic Airport Road."

Chicago's Martin Luther King Drive, a major thoroughfare spanning roughly a dozen miles south of downtown, is anchored by important hubs of black life in the city. The street features grassy boulevards with stately greystones, while other segments touch rougher patches that have fallen into disrepair, including a dilapidated motel that drew community protests over crime. Gentrification is taking hold along some parts.

The major landmarks include Bronzeville, the neighborhood where numerous black activists lived or worked and tourism officials have marked with plaques. There's also Chicago State University, where Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks taught.

In Miami, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard stretches from the predominantly Cuban town of Hialeah through largely black Liberty City and into Little Haiti - a reflection of both the city's diverse demographics as well as its lingering segregation.

Along MLK Boulevard in Hialeah, where U.S. flags fly alongside Cuban ones, MLK Boulevard isn't known as the street named after a civil rights leader. Rather, it's simply referred to by its number: "La Nueve Street," or 9th Street.

The sights and sounds of MLK Boulevard change in Liberty City, where many buildings are shuttered and storefront churches can be found on almost every block. In the decades after the civil rights movement, Liberty City has seen two race riots and struggled to escape a cycle of violence and poverty.

At Miami Edison High School on the border of Liberty City and Little Haiti, 17-year-old Judith Etienne said King would be disappointed in his unfulfilled dream.

"I'm sure Martin Luther King didn't have this in his dream," she said. "There's a lot of kids dying of gang violence in this community."

For Alderman, the King street scholar, the struggle to reclaim MLK Jr. Drive in St. Louis offers a realistic portrayal of the battles King waged a half-century ago - and where such efforts need to reach into the 21st Century.

"Those street names are really powerful social indicators of how far we've come in really fulfilling the dream, and giving us an indication of where we need to do more work," he said. "As much as it may sadden us, it demarcates and defines boundaries for civil rights activism for the future. You've got something that remembers the past that actually works, in its own tragic irony, to symbolize where the struggle still is."

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Associated Press writers Sophia Tareen in Chicago and Christine Armario in Miami contributed to this report.

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Follow Alan Scher Zagier on Twitter at HTTP://TWITTER.COM/AZAGIER

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

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   More work on the Park Over the Highway project will mean detours and delays for some drivers in downtown St. Louis this weekend.  

   Missouri transportation officials say Interstate 70 will be closed in the depressed section starting at 8:00 p.m. Friday.  All lanes will be blocked in both directions between Pine Street and the Poplar Street Bridge.  It's scheduled to reopen by 5 a.m. Monday.  

   Drivers will need to use I-64 or surface streets to get around the closure. 

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Mayor Francis Slay is asking St. Louis residents their thoughts on the legalization of marijuana.

At his blog, mayorslay.com, the Mayor asks respondents what effect they think legalization would have on crime stats and the state's economy. He also wants to know how people think the sale of marijuana should be regulated. St. Louis already treats the possession of small amounts of pot as a municipal crime--people caught with small amounts of the drug in the City are ordered to appear in city court, rather than being handcuffed and transported to jail.

You can share your thoughts by clicking here.

 

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A break in the weather allowed St. Louis city street crews to patch the pavement yesterday in an attempt to manage the growing number of potholes.  Officials hoped to have most of the major holes on the arterial roads fixed with a temporary patch on Monday. The storm of a week ago, coupled with frigid temperatures and then fast melting, has created craters on streets throughout the area. The pothole patching is a temporary fix which will hopefully last until getting more attention in the Spring. City officials are asking residents to report potholes to the Citizens' Service Bureau by calling 314.622.4800, tweeting to @stlcsb, or filling out a request for service online.  The Streets Department has also set a goal of patching potholes reported to the CSB within 48 hours of getting a request. 
 
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PASADENA, Calif. (AP) -- Move over SEC, Florida State is back on top.

Florida State finished No. 1 in the final Associated Press college football poll, ending the Southeastern Conference's record streak of seven national championships.

The Seminoles received all 60 first-place votes from the media panel after beating Auburn 34-31 in the BCS championship game on Monday night in the Rose Bowl.

Florida State's third AP national title (1993 and '99) ties it for ninth-most with rival Florida and Texas.

The Tigers (12-2) finished second in their extraordinary turnaround season, but for the first time since Texas in 2005, the Southeastern Conference is not on top of the final rankings.

Michigan State was third, followed by South Carolina and Missouri. Oklahoma finished sixth and Alabama was No. 7. So the SEC will have to settle for having four teams in the top seven. The SEC has seven ranked teams overall with No. 14 LSU, No. 18 Texas A&M and No. 24 Vanderbilt.

No. 8 Clemson, Oregon and UCF finished out the top 10.

No. 11 Stanford, No. 12 Ohio State and No. 13 Baylor finished outside the top 10 after spending much of the season in it.

No. 15 Louisville was followed by UCLA and Oklahoma State.

Rivals Southern California and Notre Dame were, 19th and 20th respectively.

The final five were Arizona State, Wisconsin, Duke, Vanderbilt and Washington.

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about ourPRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

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   As the holiday decoration come down, officials across the St. Louis area are reminding residents not to throw out their dried out Christmas trees.  Several local governments are offering recycling and tree disposal services.
   Residents in the City of St. Louis can drop off their old trees between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at Forest Park (Lower Muny parking lot), O’Fallon Park (West Florissant and Holly Avenue, picnic grounds No. 4) and Carondelet Park (near Grand Avenue and Holly Hills Drive). 
   Residents in St. Louis County who live in areas without yard waste pick-up services can take trees to one of four commercial locations at a charge of $1.  Those are ORMI Fort Bellefontaine Compost, 13060 County Park Road (Monday through Saturday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.); Route 66 Landscape Supply Center, 18900 Franklin Road (weekdays, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.); St. Louis Composting, 39 Old Elam Avenue in Valley Park (weekdays, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.) or 11294 Schaeffer Road in Maryland Heights (weekdays, 6 a.m. to 4 p.m.).
   There are tree dispoal facilities for St. Charles County residents in Lake Saint Louis, O’Fallon, St. Charles, St. Peters and Wentzville. For more information, go to www.stcharlescitymo.gov or call 636-949-3262.
   In Jefferson County, there are locations in Crystal City, High Ridge and Hillsboro. For more information, go to www.jeffcomo.org.
   Metro-east residents can drop off trees at several locations in in Madison County. For more information, go to www.madisoncountyrecycles.com or call 618-296-6647.  There are also several sites in St. Clair County. For more information, go to www.co.st-clair.il.us.
 
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Just in time for Christmas, a dog that was severely injured after being dragged for nearly a mile down I-55 last November is getting a forever home.  

 

Trooper the dog went home Thrusday with his new owner.  The St. Louis man who adopted the energetic pit-bull is an experience dog owner who recently lost his own pit-bull after years of companionship.  Humane Society of Missouri president Kathy Warnick says narrowing down the list of applicants wasn't easy.

 

Trooper's new "dad" works from home, so he'll be able to spend lots of time with the dog as he continues to recover from his injuries. 

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