Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 

NEW WHOOPING COUGH STRAIN IN US RAISES QUESTIONS

Rate this item
(0 votes)
NEW YORK (AP) -- Researchers have discovered the first U.S. cases of whooping cough caused by a germ that may be resistant to the vaccine.

Health officials are looking into whether cases like the dozen found in Philadelphia might be one reason the nation just had its worst year for whooping cough in six decades. The new bug was previously reported in Japan, France and Finland.

"It's quite intriguing. It's the first time we've seen this here," said Dr. Tom Clark of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The U.S. cases are detailed in a brief report from the CDC and other researchers in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine.

Whooping cough is a highly contagious disease that can strike people of any age but is most dangerous to children. It was once common, but cases in the U.S. dropped after a vaccine was introduced in the 1940s.

An increase in illnesses in recent years has been partially blamed on a version of the vaccine used since the 1990s, which doesn't last as long. Last year, the CDC received reports of 41,880 cases, according to a preliminary count. That included 18 deaths.

The new study suggests that the new whooping cough strain may be why more people have been getting sick. Experts don't think it's more deadly, but the shots may not work as well against it.

In a small, soon-to-be published study, French researchers found the vaccine seemed to lower the risk of severe disease from the new strain in infants. But it didn't prevent illness completely, said Nicole Guiso of the Pasteur Institute, one of the researchers.

The new germ was first identified in France, where more extensive testing is routinely done for whooping cough. The strain now accounts for 14 percent of cases there, Guiso said.

In the United States, doctors usually rely on a rapid test to help make a diagnosis. The extra lab work isn't done often enough to give health officials a good idea how common the new type is here, experts said.

"We definitely need some more information about this before we can draw any conclusions," the CDC's Clark said.

The U.S. cases were found in the past two years in patients at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. One of the study's researchers works for a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, which makes a version of the old whooping cough vaccine that is sold in other countries.

---

JournaL: HTTP://WWW.NEJM.ORG

© 2013 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.
Last modified on Thursday, 07 February 2013 06:23

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
CHINA SAYS WOMAN DIED FROM BIRD FLU NEW TO HUMANS

CHINA SAYS WOMAN DIED FROM BIRD FLU NEW TO HUMANS

BEIJING (AP) -- Chinese authorities said Wednesday that a 73-year-old Chinese woman died after being infected with a bird flu strain that had sickened a human for the first time...

REDISTRICTING MIGHT SHORTEN WAIT FOR A NEW LIVER

REDISTRICTING MIGHT SHORTEN WAIT FOR A NEW LIVER

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Where you live can affect your chances of getting a liver transplant, and your risk of dying while waiting. The nation's transplant network says it's time to mak...

CRITICS SLAM WOMAN'S FORCED C-SECTION IN BRITAIN

CRITICS SLAM WOMAN'S FORCED C-SECTION IN BRITAIN

LONDON (AP) -- A local British authority is coming under harsh criticism for having a court declare a pregnant Italian woman incompetent, forcing her to have a cesarean section ...

OBESE CANCER PATIENTS OFTEN SHORTED ON CHEMO DOSES

OBESE CANCER PATIENTS OFTEN SHORTED ON CHEMO DOSES

Obese people are less likely to survive cancer, and one reason may be a surprising inequality: The overweight are undertreated. Doctors often short them on chemotherapy by not b...

HEART REPAIR BREAKTHROUGHS REPLACE SURGEON'S KNIFE

HEART REPAIR BREAKTHROUGHS REPLACE SURGEON'S KNIFE

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Have a heart problem? If it's fixable, there's a good chance it can be done without surgery, using tiny tools and devices that are pushed through tubes into b...

REPORT: LABOR IN TUB OK BUT WATER BIRTHS UNPROVEN

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Sitting in a tub of warm water can relieve a mom-to-be's pain during the early stages of labor, but actually giving birth under ...

Health law concerns for cancer centers

Health law concerns for cancer centers

   WASHINGTON (AP) - Some of the nation's best cancer hospitals have been left out by insurers selling coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law. &nb...

LEAD POISONING TOLL REVISED TO 1 IN 38 YOUNG KIDS

LEAD POISONING TOLL REVISED TO 1 IN 38 YOUNG KIDS

NEW YORK (AP) -- Health officials say more than half a million young children are now believed to have lead poisoning in the United States. The figure is roughly twice the previ...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved