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   The company that owns the smoldering Bridgeton Landfill has 20 days to submit a new plan to stop the fire's spread toward radioactive waste buried at the adjacent West Lake Landfill.  

   The Missouri Department of Natural Resources yesterday found "significant deficiencies" in Republic Service's contingency plan.  

   Residents living near the two landfills have expressed serious concerns about the underground fire that continues to creep closer to the radioactive waste site.  

   Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster sued Republic in March because the continuous burning violates state environmental laws.  Koster says he will take them back to court if necessary to force the company to comply with the DNR's request for a new plan.

Published in Local News

   As the weather heats up with the start of summer tomorrow, many Missouri residents will head to their state park beaches.  But the Department of Natural Resources says a half-dozen of those beaches are closed.  

   Five state park swimming beaches were closed after tests this week showed high levels of bacteria.  A sixth beach - at Mark Twain State Park - remains closed because of flooding.  

   DNR officials say the beach at Harry S. Truman State Park and the Grand Glaize beach at the Lake of the Ozarks are among those that are off limits due to bacteria.  Other beaches closed include the Pittsburg beach at Pomme de Terre, St. Joe's State Park in Park Hills and Wakonda in northeastern Missouri.

Published in Around Town

   Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich says his office will audit the state agency assigned to protect the environment and public health from hazardous waste.  

   The announcement follows reports of problems with oversight at the cleanup of the former Carondelet Coke site in St. Louis.   A St. Louis Post-Dispatch report says that clean up cost taxpayers more than $12 million. while former owners Laclede Gas and SGL Group were paying less than a million dollars combined and Carondelet Coke owner J. Donald Crane was getting off the hook entirely.  The 42 acre site had been considered one of the most contaminated in the state.

   Schweich announced the audit of the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Hazardous Waste Program Friday morning.  State law gives the auditor the authority to audit state agencies and programs.

   Anyone who would like to provide information during the audit process is encouraged to contact the State Auditor's office at 800-347-8597 or by email at moaudit@auditor.mo.gov.

Published in Local News
A group of residents worried about health issues from a foul odor a suing the owners of a Bridgeton landfill.

The action follows testing by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources that showed elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide in the air. The noxious compound can cause headaches, eye, nose and throat irritation, and even breathing trouble.

But a representative for the company that owns the landfill, Republic Services, denies any danger. Republic officials say EPA and DNR testing show the odor presents no risk to the public.

A report on the DNR website says the levels of hydrogen sulfide are high enough to warrant monitoring and would pose a health risk if they intensify further.
Published in Local News
BRIDGETON, Mo. (AP) - State tests show that the odor from the Bridgeton Landfill outside St. Louis is not a health threat.

The Department of Natural Resources on Friday released a summary of recent air sampling results from the landfill. The samples showed "concentrations did not exceed a level of concern for public health." One sample collected near the landfill boundary, however, had a benzene concentration above the level considered safe.

An area deep within the inactive landfill has been smoldering for more than two years, emitting a foul odor that has generated several complaints.

Landfill operator, Phoenix-based Republic Services Inc., says it's spending millions of dollars to address the problem.

An environmental group says more testing is needed.
Published in Local News

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