Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 
SPRINGFIELD, IL (AP) – A measure allowing high school testing companies other than GED Testing Services to operate in the state is advancing in the Illinois Legislature.
 
Lawmakers say a recent GED price increase from $50 to $120 strains low-income test takers. They say changing the law could drive down costs.
 
The proposal aims to open up competition by substituting “GED” with “high school equivalency tests” in the current law. New tests would still need to pass the state’s education standards for approval.
 
Kari Docherty is a GED examiner in Jefferson and Hamilton counties. She tells WSIL-TV the state could run into problems if the rest of the country still only uses the GED program.
The bill passed the House last week and now moves to the Senate.
 
Published in Local News
COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) - Missouri has dropped the GED and made the switch to a new high school equivalency exam.
 
The Columbia Missourian reports that beginning this month, Missouri began using HiSet, which Educational Testing Service is offering. The switch came with the introduction of a more costly computer-based version of the GED.
 
Even though the state went with the lowest bidder, the new exam will be more costly for some test takers.
 
Previously it cost $40 to take the GED once, with each retake costing another $40.
 
Missouri adult education official Tom Robbins says the most affordable way to take the HiSET is to pay $95 for the five-test battery. Participants get two free retests within a 12-month period. Out of that amount, $10 goes to the state to administer the program.
Published in Local News

   The cost of taking the high school equivalency exam in Missouri could go up to $140 in January.  That's when the company that administers the GED test plans to introduce a new, computerized version of the exam.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the new test will cost twice as much as before, but GED Testing Service says states could actually save money, since they won't have to pay for things like grading the exams.  

   Missouri, like many other states, is exploring it's options.  State officials have requested bids from two competing test makers and plan to make a decision this month. 

Published in Local News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
UK STUDY: VIOLENCE MORE LIKELY AMONG VETS, TROOPS

UK STUDY: VIOLENCE MORE LIKELY AMONG VETS, TROOPS

LONDON (AP) -- Young men who have served in the British military are about three times more likely than civilians to have committed a violent offense, researchers reported Friday i...

HIV-like virus suppressed in monkey experiment

HIV-like virus suppressed in monkey experiment

   NEW YORK (AP) — Doctors may one day be able to control a patient's HIV infection in a new way: injecting swarms of germ-fighting antibodies, two new studies suggest.    In monk...

US SUICIDE RATE ROSE SHARPLY AMONG MIDDLE-AGED

US SUICIDE RATE ROSE SHARPLY AMONG MIDDLE-AGED

NEW YORK (AP) -- The suicide rate among middle-aged Americans climbed a startling 28 percent in a decade, a period that included the recession and the mortgage crisis, the governme...

FEDERAL DATA SHOW HEALTH DISPARITIES AMONG STATES

FEDERAL DATA SHOW HEALTH DISPARITIES AMONG STATES

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) -- The slow rollout of a new federal health insurance marketplace may be deepening differences in health coverage among Americans, with residents in som...

CRITICS SEEK TO DELAY NYC SUGARY DRINKS SIZE LIMIT

CRITICS SEEK TO DELAY NYC SUGARY DRINKS SIZE LIMIT

NEW YORK (AP) -- Opponents are pressing to delay enforcement of the city's novel plan to crack down on supersized, sugary drinks, saying businesses shouldn't have to spend millions...

HEALTH CARE TWEAK: BIG COMPANIES GET WIGGLE ROOM

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Big retail stores, hotels, restaurants and other companies with lots of low-wage and part-time workers are among the main benefi...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved