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The Missouri Lottery raised more than $21.5 million from November ticket sales to transfer to the Lottery Proceeds Fund for public education today. The monthly transfer is $21,523,794, which brings the total for the fiscal year to more than $130.7 million.
Since Missouri Lottery sales started in 1986, the Lottery has generated more than $4.7 billion for the state and public education. Programs funded in FY13 include the A+ Scholarship Program, the Foundation Program and Access Missouri. For complete information about Missouri Lottery proceeds, including maps of proceeds by program and by county, see the “Where the $ Goes” section at MOLottery.com.
Published in Local News

ST. LOUIS (AP) - Someone purchased a $1 million lottery ticket in St. Louis County and the Missouri Lottery is urging that person to come forward.

The Mega Millions ticket was purchased at a Circle K convenience store on Watson Road in St. Louis County for the April 12 drawing. The recipient matched all five white-ball numbers drawn, and because that person chose the Megaplier option, the prize rose to $1 million.

The winning number combination was 1, 10, 13, 19 and 21.

Mega Millions winners have 180 days from the drawing to claim the prize - in this case, until Oct. 9. Missouri Lottery offices are in St. Louis, Jefferson City, Springfield and Kansas City.

 
Published in Local News

A mother-daughter lottery playing duo win big in Missouri's Mega Millions drawing. 44-year-old Tina Wrzesinski of Overland and her 62-year-old mother Odessa Chanley of East Prairie have claimed a $250,000 prize.

The women say they play Mega Millions, Powerball and Lotto every week, and this time, it was Mega Millions that finally paid off for the licensed practical nurse and retired convenience store manager.  The two plan to pay off their bills and mortgage. 

 
Published in Local News

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