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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A Missouri House committee is considering legislation to offer additional financial assistance to persuade more top students to stay in the state after graduation day.
 
The legislation would add a forgivable loan of up to $5,000 per academic year to Missouri's Bright Flight scholarship. Each year a student works in Missouri after school would count toward one year of loan forgiveness. Leaving before the loan is repaid would require repaying the loan with interest.
 
Republican House member Mike Thomson, of Maryville, says too many top Missouri students leave. Bright Flight scholarships are awarded based on ACT or SAT scores. The legislation was examined Tuesday by the House Higher Education Committee.
 
Gov. Jay Nixon has proposed $17 million in next year's budget for a Bright Flight loan program.
Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Two alternative plans are expected to emerge from a Missouri House committee that has been looking at potential income tax cuts.
 
The House Ways and Means Committee is expected to vote Tuesday evening on the legislation.
 
One plan would gradually reduce Missouri's top individual income tax rate from 6 percent to 5.3 percent. It also would phase in a 50 percent deduction for business income reported on individual tax returns. And it would increase the current tax deduction for lower-income individuals.
 
The other plan targets only businesses. It includes a similar business income deduction, as well as a gradual 50 percent reduction in Missouri's corporate income tax rate.
 
Gov. Jay Nixon vetoed an income tax cut last year and has again emphasized concerns about the effect on education funding.
Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - As Missouri prepares to execute its third inmate in three months, a state senator wants to change the state's execution process.
 
Senate Democratic Leader Jolie Justus introduced legislation Tuesday that would create an 11-member commission responsible for setting the state's execution procedure. She says ongoing lawsuits and secrecy about the state's current lethal injection method should drive a change in protocol.
 
Missouri had used a three-drug cocktail for executions, but it threw out the process after it could no longer obtain the drugs. The state ultimately switched to a form of pentobarbital made by a compounding pharmacy, though it refuses to reveal its origins.
 
Missouri is scheduled to execute Herbert Smullsat 12:01 a.m. Wednesday. Smulls was convicted of killing a St. Louis County jeweler in 1991.
 
Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri prosecutors are organizing a campaign on behalf of a proposed constitutional amendment they say will help convict people who commit repeated sex offenses against children.
 
Prosecutors announced the formation Monday of the Protect Missouri Children committee to lead the campaign for the November ballot issue.
 
The proposal would allow evidence of past crimes to be used in prosecuting defendants accused of sex offenses against people younger than 18.
 
Platte County Prosecutor Eric Zahnd says Missouri currently has the nation's most restrictive rules on citing evidence of past child sex crimes against people facing new charges.
 
Zahnd is a co-chairman of the new campaign committee. He says the group plans to appeal to voters through mail, radio ads and potentially TV ads.
Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri prosecutors are organizing a campaign on behalf of a proposed constitutional amendment they say will help convict people who commit repeated sex offenses against children.
 
Prosecutors announced the formation Monday of the Protect Missouri Children committee to lead the campaign for the November ballot issue.
 
The proposal would allow evidence of past crimes to be used in prosecuting defendants accused of sex offenses against people younger than 18.
 
Platte County Prosecutor Eric Zahnd says Missouri currently has the nation's most restrictive rules on citing evidence of past child sex crimes against people facing new charges.
 
Zahnd is a co-chairman of the new campaign committee. He says the group plans to appeal to voters through mail, radio ads and potentially TV ads.
Published in Local News

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri is going to begin picking up the tab for students to take the ACT college entrance exam and dramatically reduce the amount of time some elementary and middle school students spend taking state assessments.

When the changes take effect next school year, Missouri will join more than a dozen states that already offer the ACT test to all their students. Missouri plans to offer the test once, free of charge to high school juniors.

Elementary and middle school students also will see changes as the state switches to new assessments tied to the Common Core standards for math and reading. Students in third, fourth, sixth and seventh grades will take a one-hour version of the test. Only fifth- and eighth-graders will take a longer seven-hour version.

Published in Local News
Thursday, 23 January 2014 15:48

Missouri denies horse slaughter application

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - Citing federal budget restrictions, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources has turned down a permit request from a northwest Missouri business that sought to process horses for meat.
 
   The DNR said in a letter Thursday to David Rains, owner of Rains Natural Meats in Gallatin, that the agency has denied Rains' permit request for his proposed horse slaughter operation because the new federal budget withheld funding for required federal inspections of the slaughtering process.
 
   The resumption of commercial horse slaughter in the U.S. was effectively blocked last week when President Barack Obama signed a budget measure that stops the U.S. Department of Agriculture from spending money for inspections necessary for slaughterhouses to ship horse meat interstate and export it.
 
   Rains didn't immediately return a call seeking comment Thursday.
Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers are considering whether to permanently block a proposal that could allow more ethanol to be blended into gasoline.
   The Senate rules committee held a hearing Thursday on a resolution that would prevent stations from selling fuel containing 15 percent ethanol.
 
   The state Agriculture Department proposed the rule last year allowing E15 gas to be sold. But a legislative panel delayed the proposal in October, citing a 2006 state law that requires a 10 percent ethanol blend. The department says it has legal authority to allow higher concentrations of ethanol.
   The House and Senate would likely need to pass the resolution by early March to permanently halt the department's proposal. That would require Gov. Jay Nixon's approval, but lawmakers have the ability to override a veto.
Published in Local News
Thursday, 23 January 2014 12:37

Missouri Senate panel endorses tax cut

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A Missouri Senate panel has endorsed an income tax cut for businesses and individuals.
 
The legislation backed Thursday by the Senate Ways and Means Committee would gradually reduce Missouri's top individual income tax rate from 6 percent to 5 percent over a decade. It also would phase in a 50 percent deduction over five years for business income reported on individual income tax returns.
 
The incremental tax cuts would take effect only as long as Missouri's net general revenues rose by at least $100 million over the high mark from the previous three years.
 
The legislation also grants an additional $1,000 tax deduction to people with incomes below $20,000.
 
The committee's approval of the legislation means it could be one of the first measures debated this year in the Senate.
Published in Local News
Wednesday, 22 January 2014 16:50

Lawmakers mull change to abortion rules

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri women would have to wait 72 hours after seeing a doctor before an abortion could be performed under legislation being considered by the House Health Care Policy Committee.
   The panel heard testimony from supporters Wednesday on how the bill would give women more time to think before terminating a pregnancy. Opponents argued the measure would just be a logistical delay designed to push women further into pregnancy before having an abortion, which can increase risk.
   Under current law, a woman must wait 24 hours after seeing a doctor before an abortion can take place. Only South Dakota and Utah require 72-hour waiting periods.
   The committee took no action on the legislation Wednesday.
Published in Local News

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