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Hundreds of protesting coal miners have returned to downtown St. Louis for a third time this year.They were marching from Peabody headquarters to U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Patriot Coal Corp. has asked the U.S. Bankruptcy Court to modify collective bargaining agreements with the United Mine Workers of America, allowing the coal company to cut health care coverage for retired miners.

St. Louis-based Patriot said in the filing the action is necessary to save more than 4,000 jobs. Patriot also seeks to change wages, benefits and work rules for existing workers in an effort to make the company more competitive.

Union leaders have been anticipating the move for some time, holding protests in St. Louis last month that drew more than 1,000 people. UMWA President Cecil Roberts says the loss of benefits would cause financial ruin and threaten the health for thousands of retirees.
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 26 February 2013 13:18

Arrests in another Peabody Coal protest

Another protest against Peabody Coal, and another round of arrests.

Ten coal miners were arrested during the march on the energy giant's head quarters. The members of the United Mine Workers of America say their members could lose healthcare and pension benefits if Patriot Coal goes bankrupt. The protesters say Peabody engineered the failure of Patriot.

Peabody maintains that Patriot was a viable company and struggled without any interference from Peabody.
Published in Local News

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