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   WAYNESVILLE, Mo. (AP) - The water has gone down but the need for volunteers to clean up damaged homes remains high in a south-central Missouri county swamped by last month's floods.

   The Pulaski County town of Waynesville was among the hardest hit amid several days of heavy rain in early August.

   Isabel Lambert is the volunteer coordinator for the county's Community Organizations Active in Disaster, or COAD. COADs are public-private partnerships that respond to disasters.

   Lambert said Thursday that more than 230 homes in the Waynesville still have mold, ruined drywall and other problems. She's seeking volunteers to gather at 9 a.m. Friday and Saturday and again Wednesday through Saturday for the next two weeks at Waynesville City Park to help with cleanup.

   For more information, send email to the Pulaski County COAD: pulaskicoad@gmail.com or call 573-337-2286.

Published in Local News

A relief fund is now accepting donations to benefit families affected by flooding in one part of southern Missouri.

The fund was established by the Meramec Regional Community Foundation. All donations will be directed toward relief efforts in Pulaski County. The hardest hit area was Waynesville--with a population of around 5,000. The initial donation was made by the Community Foundation of the Ozarks. 

You can donate by clicking here and then typing "Pulaski County Flood Relief Fund" in the field for the fund or program you're donating to.

You can donate by check as well: Mail checks to

Pulaski County Flood Relief fund to Meramec Regional Community Foundation,

4 Industrial Dr.

St. James, Mo. 65559.

 

Published in Local News

   The Humane Society of Missouri's disaster response team in St. Louis is being called into action because of flooding in south central Missouri.  A four-member team has taken a large animal rescue trailer to Waynesville to house up to 100 pets whose owners have nowhere to keep them until the flood waters recede.  

   The St. Louis shelter will also accept 15 dogs from the Waynesville shelter to make room for local pets displaced by flooding.  The dogs will be made available for adoption in St. Louis.

Published in Local News

Still no suspect in custody after an elderly man was beaten during a home invasion last week.

The Pulaski County Sheriff's Department say the 91-year-old man was home alone when several suspects forced their way into his house. The victim tried to stop the men, but they attacked him. The man remains in the hospital and the investigation continues.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Pulaski County Sheriff's Department.

 

Published in Local News

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