Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 

A Ballwin man caught on tape for shooting at cars on Interstate 44 is behind bars.

<br><Br>

The Missouri State Highway Patrol says 59-year-old Sepid Majid Salem told a passenger in his car Sunday that he “had an urge” before he stopped and fired four or five shots on Interstate 44 in Pulaski County near Devil’s Elbow.

<br><br>

A Springfield TV station reports no one was injured but one of the shots went through a sleeper berth in a semi-trailer truck. 

<br><br>

Salem is charged with first-degree assault, unlawful use of a weapon and property damage.

A witness notified authorities, who arrested Salem in Rolla.  Authorities found the semi at a rest area near Doolittle.  The truck had a camera and recorded the shooting.

 
Published in Local News
Four St. Clair men have been arrested in connection to a major copper theft ring.

The Franklin County Sheriff's Department says the four men stole copper cables from AT&T phone lines and caused $140,000 in damage. The stolen lines affected service in several towns in Franklin County.

Deputies say the suspects were arrested at their home, while in the process of preparing the stolen cable for sale. Authorities say there could be more arrests related to the ring.
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 26 February 2013 13:18

Arrests in another Peabody Coal protest

Another protest against Peabody Coal, and another round of arrests.

Ten coal miners were arrested during the march on the energy giant's head quarters. The members of the United Mine Workers of America say their members could lose healthcare and pension benefits if Patriot Coal goes bankrupt. The protesters say Peabody engineered the failure of Patriot.

Peabody maintains that Patriot was a viable company and struggled without any interference from Peabody.
Published in Local News
Lindenwood University's diving coach is in a bit of hot water after allegedly trying to punch a police officer during a traffic stop.

Kyle Friesenhahn was pulled over on February 3 for suspicion of DUI. After being taken to the police station, officers say he spit on an officer and threw a punch, but missed. Lindenwood placed Friesenhahn on unpaid leave last week and he was released from a part-time job as diving coach for schools in the Ft. Zumwalt School District.
Published in Local News
ST. PETERS, Mo. (AP) -- Red-light cameras are a hot topic again in the St. Louis area following the arrest of a St. Charles County councilman over a ticket from last summer.

Republican Councilman Joe Brazil isn't disputing the ticket he received in St. Peters, but he tells the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that it's overkill for a city to use police time on arrests for offenses that don't add penalty points to a driver's license under Missouri law. Red-light camera violations fall into that category.

"I think it's a complete waste of police resources," Brazil said. "They're overdoing it."

Brazil said he mailed in the fine before his arrest, but St. Peters spokeswoman Lisa Bedian said the city has no record of receiving Brazil's check. Bedian said the city issues arrest warrants whenever someone doesn't show up for a court date on any charge, including red-light violations.

Other cities in the St. Louis region take different approaches, and many don't issue arrest warrants for red-light violations. The cameras have spurred debate since they have been increasingly used in the St. Louis area over the past few years. Companies install the equipment in exchange for a portion of the fines. Opponents see it as an unfair money-grab, while proponents argue that the cameras help save lives by discouraging drivers from skirting through red lights.

Wentzville, like St. Peters, issues warrants for nonpayment of red-light violations. Police spokesman Paul West said the decision may depend on the type of photo taken by the camera system. Wentzville and St. Peters both use cameras that capture the face of the driver, rather than simply a photo of the vehicle license plate.

"If I can't say who is driving, how am I going to know who to arrest?" West said. Brazil was pulled over for a traffic stop last month. The officer told him there was a warrant for his arrest, frisked him, put him in the back of the police vehicle and drove him to police headquarters, where he spent about an hour in a holdover cell. Brazil said he'd mailed a cashier's check to pay his $110 fine before his arrest.

Those caught on red-light cameras are first sent a summons giving them the option of paying the $110 fine or going to court, Bedian said. If they do neither, they get a letter with a second court date and a warning that an arrest warrant will be issued if they don't respond.
Published in Around Town
ST. PETERS, Mo. (AP) -- Red-light cameras are a hot topic again in the St. Louis area following the arrest of a St. Charles County councilman over a ticket from last summer.

Republican Councilman Joe Brazil isn't disputing the ticket he received in St. Peters, but he tells the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that it's overkill for a city to use police time on arrests for offenses that don't add penalty points to a driver's license under Missouri law. Red-light camera violations fall into that category.

"I think it's a complete waste of police resources," Brazil said. "They're overdoing it."

Brazil said he mailed in the fine before his arrest, but St. Peters spokeswoman Lisa Bedian said the city has no record of receiving Brazil's check. Bedian said the city issues arrest warrants whenever someone doesn't show up for a court date on any charge, including red-light violations.

Other cities in the St. Louis region take different approaches, and many don't issue arrest warrants for red-light violations. The cameras have spurred debate since they have been increasingly used in the St. Louis area over the past few years. Companies install the equipment in exchange for a portion of the fines. Opponents see it as an unfair money-grab, while proponents argue that the cameras help save lives by discouraging drivers from skirting through red lights.

Wentzville, like St. Peters, issues warrants for nonpayment of red-light violations. Police spokesman Paul West said the decision may depend on the type of photo taken by the camera system. Wentzville and St. Peters both use cameras that capture the face of the driver, rather than simply a photo of the vehicle license plate.

"If I can't say who is driving, how am I going to know who to arrest?" West said. Brazil was pulled over for a traffic stop last month. The officer told him there was a warrant for his arrest, frisked him, put him in the back of the police vehicle and drove him to police headquarters, where he spent about an hour in a holdover cell. Brazil said he'd mailed a cashier's check to pay his $110 fine before his arrest.

Those caught on red-light cameras are first sent a summons giving them the option of paying the $110 fine or going to court, Bedian said. If they do neither, they get a letter with a second court date and a warning that an arrest warrant will be issued if they don't respond.
Published in Local News
Page 3 of 3

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
KIDS WITH SEIZURES USE POT AS TREATMENT

KIDS WITH SEIZURES USE POT AS TREATMENT

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) -- The doctors were out of ideas to help 5-year-old Charlotte Figi. Suffering from a rare genetic disorder, she had as many as 300 grand mal sei...

PFIZER REPORTS PROMISING RESULTS FOR CANCER DRUG

PFIZER REPORTS PROMISING RESULTS FOR CANCER DRUG

WASHINGTON (AP) -- An experimental drug has shown encouraging results in treating advanced breast cancer in an early clinical trial, pharmaceutical giant Pfizer reported Sunday....

HOSPITALS SEE SURGE OF SUPERBUG-FIGHTING PRODUCTS

HOSPITALS SEE SURGE OF SUPERBUG-FIGHTING PRODUCTS

NEW YORK (AP) -- They sweep. They swab. They sterilize. And still the germs persist. In U.S. hospitals, an estimated 1 in 20 patients pick up infections they didn't have when th...

HIGH-TECH GADGETS MONITOR SENIORS' SAFETY AT HOME

HIGH-TECH GADGETS MONITOR SENIORS' SAFETY AT HOME

WASHINGTON (AP) -- It could mean no more having to check up on Mom or Dad every morning: Motion sensors on the wall and a monitor under the mattress one day might automatically ale...

CLUES TO WHY MOST SURVIVED CHINA MELAMINE SCANDAL

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists wondering why some children and not others survived one of China's worst food safety scandals have uncovered a suspect: germs that live in the gut. ...

UK SCIENTISTS MAKE BODY PARTS IN LAB

UK SCIENTISTS MAKE BODY PARTS IN LAB

LONDON (AP) -- In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells. It i...

Doctors: Too few cancer patients enroll in studies

One of every 10 clinical trials for adults with cancer ends prematurely because researchers can't get enough people to test new treatments, scientists report.   The...

HIV-like virus suppressed in monkey experiment

HIV-like virus suppressed in monkey experiment

   NEW YORK (AP) — Doctors may one day be able to control a patient's HIV infection in a new way: injecting swarms of germ-fighting antibodies, two new studies suggest.    In monk...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved