Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

 
 
 

   St. Louis County may need to pay more for police salaries in order to keep key personnel from leaving.  That's according to Chief Jon Belmar, who presented a draft compensation study to the Board of Police Commissioners Wednesday.  

   The study compared the wages paid to county police personnel with the paychecks delivered to employees of a sample of area departments as well as similarly sized agencies across the country.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the study shows the median pay for police in St. Louis County is $45,500 while the median salaries for other police in the study was $60,000.  Chief Belmar tells the paper the pay disparity is already costing the department officers.

   This isn't a new issue for the county.  Former Police Chief Tim Fitch had proposed the formation of a special taxing district to help bridge the pay gap.  

   The board is expected to revisit the issue next month in advance of the county's 2015 budget-planning process which begins in May.

Published in Local News
Monday, 25 February 2013 01:09

The "Sequester" would hit bi-state area hard

Unless a deal is reached by Friday, massive federal budget cuts will automatically go into effect -- and Missouri and Illinois will feel the pinch. The "sequester" would cut $85 billion from the budget, half from defense and half from domestic programs. As part of their campaign to avoid the automatic spending cuts, the White House Sunday released a state by state breakdown of the impact.

Besides the pain of deep defense cuts which could lay off some 8,000 defense workers, Missouri could lose nearly $12 million in education funding.

In Illinois, the defense cuts would furlough more than 14,000 defense department employees and cut more than $30 million from education.

Democrats have proposed a combination of tax increases and spending cuts, including a tax on income above $1 million and eliminating tax breaks for oil companies.

Republicans have said they will only consider spending cuts.

Democratic Congressman Bill Enyart of Belleville, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that the defense cuts would hit the area hard because of the importance of Scott Air Force Base and other military installations to the local economy.

Illinois Republican Representative John Shimkus told KSDK-TV that he doesn't believe a deal will be reached before the deadline.
Published in Local News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

Wash U: Surgery goggles to aid in cancer treatment

   High tech glasses developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may help surgeons visualize cancer cells, which could help reduce the number of...

STUDY FINDS SIGNS OF BRAIN CHANGES IN POT SMOKERS

STUDY FINDS SIGNS OF BRAIN CHANGES IN POT SMOKERS

NEW YORK (AP) -- A small study of casual marijuana smokers has turned up evidence of changes in the brain, a possible sign of trouble ahead, researchers say. The young adult...

VODKA TO BLAME FOR HIGH DEATH RISK IN RUSSIAN MEN

LONDON (AP) -- Russian men who down large amounts of vodka - and too many do - have an "extraordinarily" high risk of an early death, a new study says. Researchers tracked a...

TENNIS ELBOW? STEROID SHOTS NOT BEST LONG-TERM FIX

TENNIS ELBOW? STEROID SHOTS NOT BEST LONG-TERM FIX

CHICAGO (AP) -- Commonly used steroid shots may worsen tennis elbow in the long run and increase chances that the painful condition will reappear, a small study found. By contra...

WOMAN WHO SMOKED THROUGH HOLE IN THROAT DIES

WOMAN WHO SMOKED THROUGH HOLE IN THROAT DIES

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A woman who smoked a cigarette through a hole in her throat to illustrate her struggle with nicotine addiction in a California public service advertisement has ...

FDA: ANTI-BACTERIAL SOAPS MAY NOT CURB BACTERIA

FDA: ANTI-BACTERIAL SOAPS MAY NOT CURB BACTERIA

WASHINGTON (AP) -- After more than 40 years of study, the U.S. government says it has found no evidence that common anti-bacterial soaps prevent the spread of germs, and regulat...

STUDIES: SOME CANCER TREATMENTS CAN BE SKIPPED

STUDIES: SOME CANCER TREATMENTS CAN BE SKIPPED

SAN ANTONIO (AP) -- Tens of thousands of women each year might be able to skip at least some of the grueling treatments for breast cancer - which can include surgery, heavy chem...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved