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Wednesday, 12 February 2014 12:38

Missouri death row inmate suing Oklahoma pharmacy

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A Missouri inmate scheduled for execution this month is asking a federal judge to bar a Tulsa compounding pharmacy from providing the drug to be used in his lethal injection.
 
Michael Taylor's lawsuit alleges that the Missouri Department of Corrections contracted with The Apothecary Shoppe to provide compounded pentobarbital for his Feb. 26 execution.
 
The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in Tulsa federal court, alleges the drug could cause "an unnecessarily long and inhumane execution" for Taylor, who was sentenced to die for the 1989 rape and stabbing death of a 15-year-old girl.
 
A pharmacy spokeswoman did not immediately return a call seeking comment Wednesday. In a statement last month, The Apothecary Shoppe would neither confirm nor deny that it provided pentobarbital for a Missouri execution held Jan. 29.
Published in Local News

   JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster says more than $600,000 has been recovered for the Missouri Medicaid program as part of a national settlement against the drug-maker Amgen Inc.

   Amgen agreed last month to pay $24.9 million to resolve claims it gave kickbacks to increase sales of its anemia drug Aranesp. Missouri was among several states that accused Amgen of a scheme aimed at inducing nursing home professionals to dispense Aranesp over competing drugs. Missouri's share is $603,493.

   Aranesp is one of Amgen's biggest-selling drugs, though sales have fallen sharply since 2007 because of a series of safety problems and restrictions on its use.

   In December, Amgen agreed to pay $762 million to resolve federal litigation accusing it of marketing Aranesp for unapproved uses.

   

 
Published in Local News

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