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Tuesday, 06 August 2013 10:46

No certificate for elevator where man died

    ST. LOUIS (AP) - The elevator where a St. Louis musician fell to his death was registered with the state of Missouri but an operating certificate had not been issued.

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reviewed the Missouri Department of Public Safety database following the death of Bob Reuter. Reuter, a musician and radio show host, died Saturday afternoon after falling down an elevator shaft while moving into a downtown loft.

   Police say Reuter opened the door to the nearly 100-year-old elevator and stepped into the shaft, falling about 18 feet.

   State regulations require each elevator to be registered with the Division of Fire Safety and to be inspected annually. The newspaper says the elevator was registered in February, but a state elevator registry shows no record of inspection or operating certificate.

 

Published in Local News

   The St. Louis Fire Marshal and a city building inspector are trying to determine just how a local musician fell to his death in a downtown loft building Saturday afternoon.  

   Fire Captain David Neighbors says 61 year old Bob Reuter was killed when he fell down an elevator shaft in the 1100 block of St. Charles Street.  

   Neighbors says there was no safety grill on the freight elevator shaft.  "It's like a swing door," Neighbors said.  "And then there's just a short ledge. And so we can only speculate, but stepped onto that ledge and assumed that the elevator was there."

   Neighbors says Reuter fell 18 feet from the lobby entrance to the bottom of the elevator shaft in the basement.    

   Reuter was known as a musician, photographer and radio personality.  Funeral arrangements and a public memorial are still being finalized.

 

Published in Local News

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