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   Illinois Governor Pat Quinn is urging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency not to follow through on its own proposal to reduce amounts of ethanol that must be blended with gasoline.  
   The EPA wants to reduce by billions of gallons the amount of biofuels required in gasoline sold in America.  The agency says the additive is less necessary with more fuel-efficient engines and lower fuel demand.
   Governor Quinn says lowering the requirement could hurt farmers growing renewable fuel crops, like corn.  His office says Illinois' ethanol industry is one of the nation's largest.  
   Critics say ethanol isn't as environmentally friendly as advertised.  The pressure to grow more crops for ethanol has led to planting in areas that might otherwise be set aside for conservation.  Critics also say diverting crops for fuel has contributed to rising food prices.  
   But ethanol advocates say its essential to American energy independance.
 
Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers have blocked a proposed rule that could have expanded the use of ethanol in gasoline.

A legislative panel voted Wednesday to halt a rule change that would have allowed regular gasoline to be sold with a 15 percent blend of ethanol, which generally is made from corn.

Committee members said the proposal by the Department of Agriculture went beyond what is allowed in state law. They cited a 2006 Missouri law that requires a 10 percent blend of ethanol in gasoline. The proposed rule would not have mandated E15 but would have allowed it.

The committee's vote is like a temporary moratorium. The full Legislature can decide whether to permanently block the rule when it convenes in January. Or the department could withdraw the proposed rule change.

Published in Local News

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