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   The deadline to sign up for insurance in states like Missouri and Illinois, where the federal government running the healthcare exchange, is 11:59 p.m. Monday.  And as the number of people rushing to the Healthcare.gov website accelerates, federal officials are warning that they could again face long wait times on the site.  
   The site is reportedly working well now after its disastrous start last October.  Today the problem is expected to be the sheer volume of users.  
   Those without insurance can be fined either one-percent of their income or $95, whichever is greater, when they file 2014 federal taxes.  Some local residents tell Fox 2 News that the fine isn't enough to persuade them to sign up.
   To sign up before the deadline, visit HealthCare.gov or you can call 1-800-318-2596 to sign up by phone.
   Federal officials have said the deadline will be pushed back for anyone who is still working on an application at midnight.  
Published in Local News
Wednesday, 19 March 2014 02:44

Health law concerns for cancer centers

   WASHINGTON (AP) - Some of the nation's best cancer hospitals have been left out by insurers selling coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law.
   For example, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance was excluded by five out of eight insurers in the state's insurance exchange. MD Anderson is in less than half the exchange plans in the Houston metro area. Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis is in some plans offered by one of two insurers on the Missouri exchange.
   Only four of 19 nationally recognized cancer centers that responded to an Associated Press survey said patients have access through all the insurers in their state's exchange.
   Before the new health care law, a cancer diagnosis could make you uninsurable.
   Now, you can get coverage, but the obstacles may be more subtle.
   
 
Published in Health & Fitness
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - While new marketplaces are being created for buying health insurance, many states are facing cultural and language hurdles in trying to promote and explain the changes to ethnic and hard-to-reach populations.

States with large and diverse immigrant populations have the added challenge of reaching people who speak limited or no English, and they have little time to do it. Enrollment in the exchanges begins in October.

California has the largest minority population of any state, about 22.3 million people. That's followed by Texas with 13.7 million, New York with 8.1 million, Florida with 7.9 million and Illinois with 4.7 million.

Spanish is the second most popular language, followed by Chinese.

Advocates say the success of the national health reforms will depend on the success of enrolling these communities.
Published in Health & Fitness

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