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   BONNE TERRE, Mo. (AP) - A man convicted of kidnapping, raping and killing a 17 year old St. Charles girl has been executed in Missouri, marking the state's fifth execution in as many months.
   Jeffrey Ferguson was lethally injected just after midnight Wednesday at the state prison in Bonne Terre.
   The 59 year old was accused of kidnapping Kelli Hall as she finished her shift at a Mobil gas station in St. Charles on Feb. 9, 1989.
   Her frozen body was found 13 days later on a St. Louis County farm.
   Ferguson had expressed remorse for the crime. Supporters said he'd found religion, counseled other inmates and helped start a prison hospice program.
   But St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch said Ferguson's good deeds in prison didn't make up for the senseless killing of an innocent teenager.
 
 AP's earlier story is below:
 
   The U.S. Supreme Court refused late Tuesday to stop the impending execution of a Missouri man convicted of kidnapping, raping and killing a 17 year old girl in 1989.
   The high court released its rulings barely an hour before 59 year old Jeffrey Ferguson was scheduled for lethal injection at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday at the state prison in Bonne Terre.
   Ferguson's attorneys were challenging, among other things, the state's refusal to disclose where it gets its execution drugs. Their appeals also were denied by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and the governor denied a clemency request.
   The execution will mark the state's fifth execution since November.
   Ferguson was accused of kidnapping Kelli Hall shortly before her shift ended at a Mobil gas station in St. Charles on Feb. 9, 1989. Her frozen body was found 13 days later on a St. Louis County farm.
   "Kelli Hall was only 17 when she was abducted from her workplace, raped and brutally murdered," Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon said in a statement Tuesday evening. "Her life, so full of promise, was brutally taken from her and her family."
   "The jury that convicted Jeffrey Ferguson of Kelli's murder found that the aggravating circumstances for this crime warranted the death penalty," he said in denying the clemency request. "My decision today upholds that appropriate sentence. "
   Missouri switched to a one-drug execution method late last year. The state obtains the drug, pentobarbital, from a compounding pharmacy it refuses to name.
   Ferguson's attorney, Jennifer Herndon, had asked the 8th Circuit to stay the execution, arguing that the state's secretive process prohibited the public from knowing exactly how the drug was made and whether it could cause pain and suffering for the inmate.
   The drug was used in the state's four previous executions, and the inmates showed no outward signs of distress during the execution process.
   A similar request for a stay, arguing that Ferguson wasn't given timely notice of the method being used for his execution, was filed with the U.S. Supreme Court.
   Ferguson's supporters argue that he has turned his life around behind bars and has been a model prisoner who works with other inmates, helped start a hospice program and performed other good deeds.
   Herndon said Ferguson was an alcoholic who blacked out on the night of the murder, but that he became devoutly religious once sent to death row.
   Ferguson and a friend, Kenneth Ousley, were at a Shell service station in St. Charles on the night of the murder.
   Hall, who worked at the Mobil station across the street, was nearing the end of her eight-hour work shift when she went outside to check the levels of four fuel tanks.
   A witness said Ferguson's Chevrolet Blazer pulled up. The witness saw a man standing close to Hall with a hand in his pocket. Ferguson was carrying a pistol.
   About a half-hour later, a co-worker went looking for Hall. When they found out she was not home and her purse was still at the station, they contacted police. Later, some of her clothing was found by a city worker in the St. Louis County town of Chesterfield.
   On Feb. 22, Warren Stemme was approaching a machine shed on his farm in Maryland Heights, another St. Louis suburb, when he found Hall's frozen body, naked except for socks. She had been strangled.
   An acquaintance suspicious about Ferguson led police to him, and he was convicted of first-degree murder. Ousley pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in 1993; he is serving a life term but is eligible for parole.
 
Published in Local News

   A compounding pharmacy in Oklahoma won't be the one providing Missouri with a made-to-order drug for an upcoming execution.  Court documents filed Monday show that death row inmate Michael Taylor has reached an agreement with The Apothecary Shoppe in Tulsa.  Under the deal, the pharmacy won't prepare or provide pentobarbital or any other drug for use in Taylor's execution.  

   Taylor's attorney, Matt Hellman, says the pharmacy has not already provided any such drug to the Missouri Department of Corrections for Taylor's execution which is scheduled for February 26.

   Missouri Corrections officials have said Taylor's execution will go on as scheduled, but it's not clear where the state will get the necessary drug for lethal injection, or if the state already has enough pentobarbitol on hand for the task. 

   Taylor has pleaded guilty to the 1989 abduction, rape and murder of a 15 year old Kansas City girl.

Published in Local News
   ST. LOUIS (AP) - With lethal injection drugs in short supply and new questions surfacing about their effectiveness, lawmakers in some death-penalty states are considering bringing back relics of a gruesome past: firing squads, electrocutions and gas chambers.
   Most states abandoned those e methods more than a generation ago in a bid to make capital punishment more palatable to the public and to a judicial system worried about inflicting cruel and unusual punishments that violate the Constitution.
   But to some elected officials, the drug shortages and legal challenges are beginning to make lethal injection seem too vulnerable to complications.
   Missouri state Rep. Rick Brattin has proposed making firing squads an option. The state's attorney general has suggested rebuilding the gas chamber. A Virginia lawmaker wants to make electrocution an option if drugs aren't available.
 
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 22 October 2013 14:16

Missouri announces new lethal injection drug

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The Missouri Department of Corrections is switching to a new lethal injection drug, less than two weeks after Gov. Jay Nixon halted executions until a replacement for propofol was found.

 

   The corrections department says in a news release Tuesday that it will use pentobarbital. The Death Penalty Information Center says 13 states use the drug for executions.

 

   The department says the execution of Joseph Franklin on Nov. 20 is still on. Franklin killed Gerald Gordon outside a St. Louis-area synagogue in 1977.

 

   Propofol is the most widely used anesthetic. Nixon on Oct. 11 halted the execution of convicted killer Allen Nicklasson, scheduled for Oct. 23, in part because the European Union was weighing export limits on propofol if it was used in an execution. Most propofol is made in Europe.

Published in Local News

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