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Another blow to the Normandy School District. The Post-Dispatch reports that the Missouri House rejected a spending bill that would provide the district with $1.5 million to keep schools open for the rest of the school year. The money is part of a $327 million supplemental budget bill that was unanimously passed by the Senate. The House and Senate will have a joint committee to resolve the differences. Without the funds, Normandy is likely to run out of money by next month.

Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri's transportation chief is warning that the state won't have enough money to maintain its roads in a few years.
 
The state's construction budget for roads and bridges has fallen from about $1.3 billion annually five years ago to $685 million this year. Transportation Department Director Dave Nichols said Thursday that the annual road-and-bridge budget is projected to fall to about $325 million in 2017.
 
That's considerably shy of the $485 million annually that Nichols says it takes to maintain the highway system in its current condition.
 
Nichols spoke at a transportation conference in Jefferson City hosted by the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry.
 
Some of those at the conference are pushing a proposed ballot initiative that would ask voters to impose a 1-cent sales tax for transportation.
 
Published in Local News

A $1 million grant was awarded to metro area law enforcement to assist in efforts to aid in the prosecution of sex trafficking suspects.

The grant is courtesy of the US Department of Justice. Funds will be split between helping victims of trafficking and the prosecution of trafficking crimes. St. Louis County Police and St. Charles County Police are sharing the money with three social service groups.

Missouri is one of only six groups being awarded the grant nationwide.

Published in Local News
Wednesday, 21 August 2013 17:21

Feds running out of money to fight wildfires

GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) - Running out of money to fight wildfires at the peak of the season, the U.S. Forest Service is diverting $600 million from timber, recreation and other areas to fill the gap.

The nation's top wildfire-fighting agency was down to $50 million after spending $967 million so far this year, Forest Service spokesman Larry Chambers said Wednesday in an email.

Wildfire spending by other federal agencies takes the total to $1.2 billion.

Chambers says the $50 million the Forest Service has left is typically enough to pay for just a few days of fighting fires when the nation is at its top wildfire preparedness level, which went into effect Tuesday.

There are 51 large uncontained fires burning across the nation, making it tough to meet demands for fire crews and equipment.

Published in National News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Governor Jay Nixon says low-interest loans will be available to residents and business owners in several eastern Missouri communities hit by damaging weather from May 29th through June 10th.

Nixon's office said Friday the U.S. Small Business Administration has granted the state's request for the assistance.

The low-interest loans will be offered in the city of St. Louis and in St. Louis, St. Charles, Franklin, Jefferson, Lincoln and Warren counties.

Homeowners, renters, business owners and nonprofit organizations may apply for the loans to repair or replace property, equipment and inventory damaged by floods, high winds hail and tornadoes.

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri social service officials have told a House panel the state could save $28 million annually by moving people from welfare programs onto federal disability payments.

The Republican-led committee is investigating a contract that pays Boston-based Public Consulting Group $2,300 for every Missouri resident moved onto disability payments.

Officials with the Department of Social Services told the panel Monday the contracts saves money for the state and assigns people to the appropriate program.

People on welfare are required to engage in job-seeking activities. Committee Chairman Rep. Jay Barnes, of Jefferson City, says people receiving disability payments are unlikely to seek work because it would negatively affect their federal benefits. Barnes called for the hearing in early April.

 

Published in Local News
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The move to a new building for the St. Louis Police Department is going to be more expensive than first thought.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that bids came in more than $1.6 million over expectations. Now, the move will be delayed until early next year — nearly a year later than the original estimate.

The department received seven bids this month. The lowest was $6.3 million to retrofit a former Wells Fargo office building at 1915 Olive St. The department was expecting a cost of about $4.7 million.

Chief Sam Dotson says the awarding of a contract is on hold while officials ensure that the low bidder meets minority participation requirements.

The department's current headquarters at 1200 Clark Ave. dates to 1927 and needs extensive renovation.
Published in Around Town
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The move to a new building for the St. Louis Police Department is going to be more expensive than first thought.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that bids came in more than $1.6 million over expectations. Now, the move will be delayed until early next year — nearly a year later than the original estimate.

The department received seven bids this month. The lowest was $6.3 million to retrofit a former Wells Fargo office building at 1915 Olive St. The department was expecting a cost of about $4.7 million.

Chief Sam Dotson says the awarding of a contract is on hold while officials ensure that the low bidder meets minority participation requirements.

The department's current headquarters at 1200 Clark Ave. dates to 1927 and needs extensive renovation.
Published in Local News

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