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   SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - A labor coalition wants Illinois' pollution control board to waive pollution controls at coal-fired plants being sold by Ameren Corp.

   The AFL-CIO is making its position known hours before the Illinois Pollution Control Board is set to meet in Springfield on Tuesday.

   The AFL-CIO says that move by the board would provide certainty to employers and communities in central and southern Illinois. But environmental groups say pollution upgrades are needed.

   Houston-based Dynegy wants to buy the plants from Ameren, which has a waiver that allowed it to delay installing soot-control equipment at the five plants.

   The board refused to transfer the waiver to Dynegy, saying it must make its own case for a waiver. Dynegy says it will do so.

   The board is expected to make a decision by November.

 
Published in Local News

   The company that's taking over Ameren's coal-fired power plants in Illinois wants to take over their 5 year pollution waiver as well.  

   Dynegy Inc. agreed to acquire the plants six months after the Illinois Pollution Control Board granted a variance giving Ameren more time to meet stricter air pollution limits at their central and southern Illinois plants.  

   Ameren and Dynegy are expected to argue that the subsidiary formed to acquire the plants can't afford the costly pollution controls in a depressed power market, and would have to close some plants if a waiver isn't granted.  

Published in Local News

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