Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
Wednesday, 06 November 2013 02:07

Sebelius faces lawmakers anew on health care law

   WASHINGTON (AP) — Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is returning to Capitol Hill for fresh questioning about the health care law.

   She'll be hearing Wednesday from senators with growing lists of concerns about President Barack Obama's crowning legislative achievement.

   Sebelius was due to appear before the Senate Finance Committee. Its chairman, Montana Democratic Sen. Max Baucus, was a chief author of the 2010 law. But even he has concerns about the balky Healthcare.gov website and the potential security risks it poses for consumers' private information.

   Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch, the panel's top Republican, is also worried about people whose insurers are dropping them because their current policies don't meet the law's higher requirements.

   Sebelius testified to a House committee last week and apologized for the problem-plagued startup of the program.

Published in National News
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators demanded answers on Tuesday from senior military leaders on why an Air Force commander dismissed charges against a lieutenant colonel after he was convicted of sexual assault.

"Do you really think that after a jury has found someone guilty, and dismissed someone from the military for sexual assault, that one person, over the advice of their legal counselor, should be able to say, 'Never mind'?" Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asked Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis, the top officer at U.S. Central Command, at a Senate hearing.

Mattis explained that commanders, including female commanders, have the authority to act for a reason. "And I would just tell you that I would look beyond one case," he said.

McCaskill sent a letter to Air Force officials seeking an explanation while Sens. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., wrote to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel asking him to review the case.

The Air Force Times reported last month that Lt. Col. James Wilkerson, a former inspector general at Aviano Air Base in Italy, had been convicted on Nov. 2 on charges of abusive sexual contact, aggravated sexual assault and three instances of conduct unbecoming of an officer and a gentleman. The incident had involved a civilian employee.

Wilkerson was sentenced to a year in prison and dismissal from the service. But Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin, the commander of 3rd Air Force, later dismissed the charges. The Air Force Times reported that Franklin had concluded that the evidence was insufficient to meet the burden of proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

"This is a travesty of justice," Boxer and Shaheen wrote. "At a time when the military has unequivocally stated that there is zero tolerance for sexual assault, this is not the message it should be sending to our service men and women, and to our nation."

They asked Hagel for information on what was the basis for Franklin's decision and pressed him to act immediately to restrict such authority to dismiss military court decisions unilaterally.

McCaskill wrote Air Force Secretary Michael Donley and Gen. Mark Welsh, the Air Force chief of staff, that Franklin's decision "show ignorance, at best, and malfeasance, at worst."

"I strongly urge you to undertake an immediate review of his conduct and consider removing him from his leadership position," the senator wrote.

She pointed out that as the Air Force and "other military organizations are redoubling efforts to erase a culture that has often turned a blind eye on sexual assault, Lt. Gen. Franklin's conduct undermines this important shift."

In January, Welsh likened sexual assault in the Air Force's ranks to a cancer and vowed to tackle the problem by screening personnel more carefully and putting an end to bad behaviors like binge drinking that can lead to misconduct.

Welsh told a House oversight committee that the service recorded a disturbing number of reports of sexual assault last year even as it worked to curb misconduct in the wake of a sex scandal at its training headquarters in Texas. Dozens of young female recruits and airmen at Lackland Air Force Base near San Antonio were victimized by their instructors who sexually harassed, improperly touched or raped them.

Most difficult, Welsh said, is transforming a culture in which victims are often reluctant to report what happened because of guilt, shame or fear they won't be believed.
Published in National News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
REPORT: NATION'S KIDS NEED TO GET MORE PHYSICAL

REPORT: NATION'S KIDS NEED TO GET MORE PHYSICAL

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Reading, writing, arithmetic - and PE? The prestigious Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of phy...

MEDICAL POT MEASURE COULD BOOST FLA. DEMOCRATS

MEDICAL POT MEASURE COULD BOOST FLA. DEMOCRATS

MIAMI (AP) -- Tied to an unpopular president and his signature health care law, Democrats in the nation's largest swing state see medical marijuana as a potential antidote to po...

CLUES TO WHY MOST SURVIVED CHINA MELAMINE SCANDAL

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists wondering why some children and not others survived one of China's worst food safety scandals have uncovered a suspect: germs that live in the gut. ...

BIRD FLU SPIKES IN CHINA AHEAD OF LUNAR NEW YEAR

A spate of bird flu cases since the beginning of the year in China has experts watching closely as millions of people and poultry are on the move ahead of the Lunar New Year hol...

STUDY: TOBACCO CONTROL HAS SAVED MILLIONS OF LIVES

STUDY: TOBACCO CONTROL HAS SAVED MILLIONS OF LIVES

CHICAGO (AP) -- Anti-smoking measures have saved roughly 8 million U.S. lives since a landmark 1964 report linking smoking and disease, a study estimates, yet the nation's top d...

EU: TEST SHOW NO SAFETY ISSUES WITH HORSEMEAT

EU: TEST SHOW NO SAFETY ISSUES WITH HORSEMEAT

BRUSSELS (AP) -- The European Union says more than 7,000 tests across the 27-nation bloc on products labeled as beef show that nearly 5 percent of them contained horse meat. The...

HEALTHY QUINTUPLETS BORN IN SALT LAKE HOSPITAL

HEALTHY QUINTUPLETS BORN IN SALT LAKE HOSPITAL

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- A Utah woman gave birth to a healthy set of quintuplets over the weekend with help from a team of eight doctors, one anesthesiologist and dozens of nurses en...

SOME SCHOOL DISTRICTS QUIT HEALTHIER LUNCH PROGRAM

SOME SCHOOL DISTRICTS QUIT HEALTHIER LUNCH PROGRAM

After just one year, some schools around the country are dropping out of the healthier new federal lunch program, complaining that so many students turned up their noses at meals p...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved