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CARBONDALE, Ill. (AP) - Smokers at Southern Illinois University will only be able to light up in a handful of places on the Carbondale campus starting this summer.
 
Carbondale Chancellor Rita Cheng says that as of July 1 the campus will be effectively smoke-free. Only designated areas in campus parking lots are exceptions.
 
Cheng told the Southern Illinoisan that smoking already is banned within 15 feet of building entrances. The ban includes smoking in dormitories.
 
Cheng hopes the campus someday will be entirely smoke free.
 
Some smokers on campus aren't happy, though. Senior Jon Poynter says he understands people around a smoker may not like the smoke. But he believes the ban denies him his right to smoke.
 
Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights says more than 1,100 college campuses nationwide are smoke free.
 
Published in Local News
Monday, 17 February 2014 07:13

Illinois Senators consider car smoking ban

   Illinois lawmakers are considering a measure that would make it illegal for adults to smoke in a motor vehicle if there are children present.  Officials with the American Lung Association say they support the measure as a way to educate parents about the dangers of second-hand smoke to their child.  

   Senate bill 2659 would make it illegal to smoke with a minor in the vehicle.  Violators would face a one-hundred-dollar fine, but police wouldn't be able to pull drivers over just for violate the smoking ban.  

   Fourteen other states are considering similar measures.  Five states, including Arkansas and Louisiana have already made smoke-free cars the law.

Published in Local News
   WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration is using ads that depict yellow teeth and wrinkled skin to show the nation's at-risk youth the costs associated with cigarette smoking.
   The federal agency said Tuesday it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called "The Real Cost" that's aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit.
   Advertisements will run in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. for at least one year beginning Feb. 11. The campaign will include ads on TV stations such as MTV and print spots in magazines like Teen Vogue. It also will use social media.
   "Our kids are the replacement customers for the addicted adult smokers who die or quit each day," said Mitch Zeller, the director of the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products. "And that's why we think it's so important to reach out to them — not to lecture them, not to throw statistics at them — but to reach them in a way that will get them to rethink their relationship with tobacco use."
   Zeller, who oversaw the anti-tobacco "Truth" campaign while working at the nonprofit American Legacy Foundation time in the early 2000s, called the new campaign a "compelling, provocative and somewhat graphic way" of grabbing the attention of more than 10 million young people ages 12 to 17 that are open to, or are already experimenting with, cigarettes.
   According to the FDA, nearly 90 percent of adult smokers started using cigarettes by age 18 and more than 700 kids under 18 become daily smokers each day. The agency aims to reduce the number of youth cigarette smokers by at least 300,000 within three years.
   "While most teens understand the serious health risks associated with tobacco use, they often don't believe the long-term consequences will ever apply to them," said FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg. "We'll highlight some of the real costs and health consequences associated with tobacco use by focusing on some of the things that really matter to teens — their outward appearance and having control and independence over their lives."
   Two of the TV ads show teens walking into a corner store to buy cigarettes. When the cashier tells them it's going to cost them more than they have, the teens proceed to tear off a piece of their skin and use pliers to pull out a tooth in order to pay for their cigarettes. Other ads portray cigarettes as a man dressed in a dirty white shirt and khaki pants bullying teens and another shows teeth being destroyed by a ray gun shooting cigarettes.
   The FDA is evaluating the impact of the campaign by following 8,000 people between the ages of 11 and 16 for two years to assess changes in tobacco-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors.
   The campaign announced Tuesday is the first in a series of campaigns to educate the public about the dangers of tobacco use.
   In 2011, the FDA said it planned to spend about $600 million over five years on the campaigns aimed at reducing death and disease caused by tobacco, which is responsible for about 480,000 deaths a year in the U.S.
   Tobacco companies are footing the bill for the campaigns through fees charged by the FDA under a 2009 law that gave the agency authority over the tobacco industry.
   Future campaigns will target young adults ages 18-24 and people who influence teens, including parents, family members and peers. Other audiences of special interest include minorities, gays, people with disabilities, the military, pregnant women, people living in rural areas, and low-income people.
Published in Health & Fitness

   A study by a North Carolina think tank concludes that a state-wide smoking ban would not harm Missouri bars and restaurants.  

   While several local governments bar indoor smoking in public, there's no state-wide ban.  Opponents to a ban often argue that it would reduce revenue and employment at bars and restaurants.  

   Researchers with RTI used sales and tobacco tax data from 216 cities and counties in 8 states over 11 years.  They projected that seven of the states, including Missouri, would have no economic impact, and West Virginia would actually see an employment boost.  

   The study was funded by the CDC.

   Illinois already bars smoking in bars and restaurants.

Published in Local News

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