Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 

   Conservation experts aren't sure why, but it seems the yellow jacket population is bigger than usual in the St. Louis area this year.  

   Mike Arduser of the Missouri Department of Conservation told Fox 2 News that the number of calls they've gotten regarding yellow jackets has doubled since last year.  "Yellow jackets are always present and always abundant this time of year, because their colony cycle peaks right about now," he says.

   And that can be a problem when the flying, stinging insects nest too close to humans.  Consumers can buy products to kill the pests themselves, but for large nests, it may be best to call in a professional.  

   Dr. Anthony Scalzo with the Missouri Poison Center at Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center told Fox 2 that too many wasp stings can be dangerous.   Dr. Scalzo says even people who are not allergic can die from too many  stings. "In a toddler, maybe greater than five stings per couple of pounds of body weight" can be fatal, he says.  "In an adult it could be, technically, as few as 30-50 stings from a wasp."

   That's one reason Arduser says wasp and yellow jacket nests should be left alone if the insects aren't bothering anyone. "They're part of the landscape now," he says.  "You just have to sort of learn to live with them like mosquitoes or horseflies or something else.  They'll be gone soon, as soon as it gets cold. 

 

Published in Around Town

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
New health law could push individual medical claim costs up

New health law could push individual medical claim cost…

A new report says the national health law will push up the cost of medical claims in both Missouri and Illinois. The study by the Society of Actuaries says the amount paid by ...

TRANS FAT DOESN'T STIR MUCH 'NANNY STATE' DEBATE

WASHINGTON (AP) -- They are among our most personal daily decisions: what to eat or drink. Maybe what to inhale. Now that the governm...

BELGIUM SET TO EXTEND RIGHT-TO-DIE LAW TO CHILDREN

BRUSSELS (AP) -- Belgium, one of the very few countries where euthanasia is legal, is expected to take the unprecedented step this week of abolishing age restrictions on who can...

HOSPITALS SEE SURGE OF SUPERBUG-FIGHTING PRODUCTS

HOSPITALS SEE SURGE OF SUPERBUG-FIGHTING PRODUCTS

NEW YORK (AP) -- They sweep. They swab. They sterilize. And still the germs persist. In U.S. hospitals, an estimated 1 in 20 patients pick up infections they didn't have when th...

ALZHEIMER'S BUDDY PROGRAM PAIRS PATIENTS, STUDENTS

ALZHEIMER'S BUDDY PROGRAM PAIRS PATIENTS, STUDENTS

CHICAGO (AP) -- At age 80, retired Chicago physician and educator Dan Winship is getting a bittersweet last chance to teach about medicine - only this time he's the subject. In ...

FIRST LADY CALLS SUMMIT ON FOOD MARKETING

FIRST LADY CALLS SUMMIT ON FOOD MARKETING

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Michelle Obama wants food makers and entertainment companies to spend less time advertising sweet and salty foods to kids and more time promoting healthier optio...

HIGH-TECH GADGETS MONITOR SENIORS' SAFETY AT HOME

HIGH-TECH GADGETS MONITOR SENIORS' SAFETY AT HOME

WASHINGTON (AP) -- It could mean no more having to check up on Mom or Dad every morning: Motion sensors on the wall and a monitor under the mattress one day might automatically ale...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved