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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

   Residents and business owners in the largest Bosnian community in America are frustrated by the crime in their Bevo Mill neighborhood.  

   Two convenience store murders in less than a month prompted residents to pack the Bosnian Chamber of Commerce office Wednesday night, looking for answers from City Police Chief Sam Dotson.

   A nineteen year old clerk at the Quick Stop store on Chippewa was gunned down May 31st.  His brother was also shot and wounded.  Then last week a 30 year old father with a pregnant wife was shot to death while working at a 7-11 at Gravois and Bates.

   The publisher of the local Bosnian newspaper, Sabah says St. Louis is developing a reputation for crime and that's off-putting to future Bosnian immigrants.  "This is a great town for new comers.  A great town for new businesses.  A great town for residential areas, but recently, suddenly, what's going on around is not good for such positive stories."

   Chief Dotson told the group that crime is actually down seven-percent in the area, but that he understands their concerns and urged them to put pressure on judges to sentence repeat offenders to prison instead of probation.

 

   Despite opposition from reinstated Ellisville Mayor Adam Paul, tax breaks for a proposed Walmart development are moving forward, albeit slowly.  The City Council voted 4-3 Wednesday night to authorize TIFs for project developer Sansone Group.  

   The vote came after Jim Sansone and Mayor Paul exchanged heated words during the packed meeting.  Sansone promised court action if the council reversed their 2012 approval of the development.  Paul acknowledged his continued opposition, but also recognized that the council majority would rule.  

   A second vote is needed to finalized the bill.  That's expected to happen at a special council meeting later this month.

Cool Down St. Louis kicks off summer program

Wednesday, 19 June 2013 06:02 Published in Local News

   Local leaders have put out the call to those in need and to those who can help. Cool Down St. Louis and Ameren kicked off their annual summer program to keep elderly and disabled St. Louisans safe from the deadly heat.

   Ameren donated the first 240 air conditioners with the hope that more units will be donated and more money raised to assist the most vulnerable members of the community.

   St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay says donations are critical to this program's success.  "It is important to note that eventually, all the funds will be exhausted this year," Slay said.  "And remind you that 100 percent of proceeds, 100 percent of private donations go directly to helping someone in need. There are no administrative costs that come out of our donations."  

   For more information about donating an air conditioning unit or giving a monetary donation, log on to  CoolDownStLouis.org.

 

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