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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

Quinn calls IL lawmakers back for special session

Friday, 07 June 2013 03:13 Published in Local News

   Illinois Governor Pat Quinn wants lawmakers to return to Springfield later this month, but some legislators aren't sure why.  

   Quinn released a statement Thursday criticizing lawmakers for failing to address the state's nearly 100-billion dollar pension shortfall and calling a special session which begins June 19th. The announcement follows news that Moody's Investors Service is lowering Illinois' credit rating.  But a spokesman for House Speaker Michael Madigan says he believes the special session is to deal with guns, not pensions.

   Quinn is currently considering conceal-carry legislation that was passed last week.  Quinn hasn't said if he'll sign the plan. If he vetoes it, lawmakers could override the veto.

   The Grand Center Arts Academy won't hire a controversial Clayton principal.  But they won't keep their current principal either, despite protests by parents and students.  On Thursday, school officials reaffirmed their decision not to renew principal Lynne Glickert’s contract.  

   Glickert says she still doesn't know why she's being let go. Last week she thought she was meeting for her first performance review since the school opened in 2010. Instead, she was told her current contract would not be renewed, even though she just signed a new one in May.  "You just think things are fine if no one's telling you there are concerns," Glickert said.  "So it was a shock, a real shock."

   School officials did change their mind about hiring former Clayton High School principal Dr. Louise Losos.  Losos left Clayton High after allegations that she'd created a fake Facebook account to monitor students.  

   The board plans to conduct a national search for a new principal.

 

   SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - Springfield and Sangamon County officials have announced an agreement with the state on design work for consolidating train traffic through Illinois' capital city. The effort is part of high-speed rail development.

   The agreement made public Wednesday involves nearly $8.7 million to pay for half of the design work. The project would move rail traffic through the downtown core farther out to a corridor on the city's east side.

   The deal was signed by Illinois Department of Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider, Springfield Mayor Michael Houston and Sangamon County Board Chairman Andy Van Meter.

   The project is part of the Chicago-to-St. Louis high-speed rail development. There is no current funding for train traffic consolidation.

   The plan would include new track alignments and separating automobile and train traffic in spots.

   

 

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