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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

Sierra Club seeks review of Ill. pollution waiver

Friday, 03 January 2014 03:39 Published in Local News
   SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - The Sierra Club is asking an Illinois appeals court to overturn a state board's ruling that allows Dynegy Inc. more time to install soot controls on five coal-fired power plants it recently acquired from Ameren Corp.
   The appeal was recorded yesterday by the 4th District Appellate Court. It seeks reversal of the Pollution Control Board's November decision to give Dynegy until 2020 to install state-required controls on sulfur dioxide emissions.
   The board agreed 3-1 that requiring significant pollution controls on the plants by 2015 would be a financial hardship.
   Holly Bender is deputy director for the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign. She says the board's ruling went against the evidence and sets a "dangerous precedent."
   Dynegy spokeswoman Katy Sullivan says the variance is more stringent than one granted to Ameren.
 
   SEATTLE (AP) - Boeing's contract proposal to machinists in the Puget Sound region would likely increase some workers' annual base salaries to more than $100,000 in the coming years.
   The offer going to a vote Friday would slow the growth of machinists' wages starting in 2016, but workers would still get regular cost-of-living adjustments and an additional one percent raise every other year.
   If historical cost-of-living changes continue, about 400 machinists in Washington state would surpass $100,000 in base pay in 2020, not counting shift differentials or overtime. The most common class of machinists would reach $82,000 at that point.
   Local union leaders are recommending that machinists reject the proposal, in part because it would slow how fast wages grow.
   But the contract would secure work on Boeing's new 777X in the region at a time when 22 states, including Missouri and Illinois are vying for those jobs.
 

Writer, Doyle estate dispute copyright on Sherlock

Friday, 03 January 2014 03:15 Published in National News
   CHICAGO (AP) - It's the kind of puzzle that might have amused Sherlock Holmes himself.
   Copyright protections have expired on nearly all of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's tales about the pipe-puffing detective in the deerstalker hat. So are writers free to depict the character in new mysteries without seeking permission or paying license fees?
   A federal judge in Chicago says yes, so long as they don't stray into territory covered in the 10 stories still protected by copyright. But the Doyle estate is considering an appeal this month.
   Descendants of the Scottish physician and author argue he continued to develop the characters of Holmes and Dr. Watson in the later works so they should remain off-limits until the remaining copyrights run out at the end of 2022.
 

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