Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 
Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

Senate Dems curb filibuster, risk future problems

Friday, 22 November 2013 02:24 Published in National News

   WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats quickly enjoyed the first fruits of a milestone Senate vote making it harder for the Republican minority to block President Barack Obama's nominations: They swiftly ended a GOP filibuster against one of his top judicial selections and prepared to do the same for two others.

   Over the longer term, they might regret what they did and how they did it, Republicans and others are warning.

   When Democrats muscled the changes through Thursday over the opposition of every GOP senator, it helped heighten Congress' already high level of partisan animosity. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., used a process that let Democrats unilaterally weaken the filibuster by simple majority vote, rather than the two-thirds margin usually used for major changes in chamber rules, which would have required GOP support.

   "If the majority can change the rules, then there are no rules," said veteran Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., who has resisted similar changes in the past. "It puts a chill on the entire U.S. Senate."

   Such comments suggested a further erosion in the mutual trust the two parties would need to tackle sensitive, large-scale issues like still-massive budget deficits and a tax system overhaul. The tensions also won't help Congress' efforts early next year to avoid another government shutdown and prevent a federal default, twin disputes that the two parties struggled to resolve this fall.

   And even though Thursday's change left intact the 60 Senate votes needed to filibuster, or delay, legislation, it raised an obvious question: Might a future Senate majority, hitting obstacles advancing a president's agenda, ram through changes weakening filibusters against bills too?

   In control of both the White House and Congress someday, Senate Republicans might be tempted to force a filibuster change to cover legislation and use it, for example, to repeal Obama's health care law.

   "I don't think this is a time to be talking about reprisals," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said after the vote. He said later, "The solution to this problem is at the ballot box. We look forward to having a great election in November 2014."

   McConnell spoke after the Senate voted 52-48 to allow a simple majority vote to end filibusters, instead of the 60 votes required since 1975. The change affects nominees for top federal agency and judicial appointments, but not Supreme Court justices.

   Republicans had warned repeatedly that should they win Senate control, they will happily use the diluted filibuster to win Senate approval for future nominees by GOP presidents that under past standards Democrats might have blocked.

   "The silver lining is that there will come a day when the roles are reversed," said Iowa Sen. Charles Grassley, top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee. He warned that when his party wins a Senate majority they likely will apply the 51-vote filibuster threshold to a Republican president's Supreme Court nominees.

   "The tyranny of the majority. That's what it's going to be" at some point in the future, predicted Steve Bell, a former top Senate Republican aide who is now a senior director at the Bipartisan Policy Center, which advocates partisan cooperation.

   Democrats said GOP delays had gone too far, blocking nominees not for their qualifications or ideology but for political reasons like preventing too many Democrats from serving on a court.

   Republicans argued that Democrats have acted similarly to block appointments by GOP presidents and warned they would use Senate rules to their advantage whenever they win control of the chamber.

   "We understand all the considerations," Reid said of the risks. "But let's be realistic. What could they do more to slow down the country? What could they do more than what they've already done to stop the Senate from legislating?"

   "We'd much prefer the risk of up-or-down votes and majority rule than the risk of continued total obstruction," said New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, the No. 3 Senate Democratic leader.

   Immediately after the showdown roll call, senators voted to end GOP delays against attorney Patricia Millett, whom Obama wants to fill one of three vacancies at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The powerful court has jurisdiction over White House and federal agency actions.

   Millett will be formally confirmed after the Senate returns from a two-week Thanksgiving recess.

   December votes were also planned on District Judge Robert L. Wilkins and law professor Cornelia Pillard, two other Obama choices Republicans had blocked for the D.C. Circuit. That will give judges picked by Democratic presidents a 7-4 edge over those selected by Republicans for that court.

   Labor and liberal groups hailed the filibuster curbs, expressing satisfaction that Democrats had finally stood up to the GOP.

   "There was no choice," said Nan Aron, president of the liberal coalition Alliance for Justice. "The Republican minority had turned the existing rules into weapons of mass obstruction."

   But Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, one of three Democrats who voted against diluting the filibuster, noted that past Democratic minorities have used the procedure to block GOP moves to limit abortion rights and repeal the estate tax.

   He said he feared that a future Senate majority would weaken filibusters against legislation and "down the road, the hard-won protections and benefits for our people's health and welfare will be lost."

UM board weighing 2014 tuition hikes

Friday, 22 November 2013 02:16 Published in Local News

   Tuition is probably going up at all four University of Missouri campuses next year.  

   The university's Board of Curators met yesterday at the UMSL campus to begin weighing a recommendation that an increase be tied to the nation's inflation rate.  The rate is based on the Consumer Price Index for December and won't be known until next month.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that budget projections expect it to be about 1.7 percent.  

   The board could vote on the amount of the increase in January.  

   Some non-resident students will pay even more.  Graduate and undergraduate students the Columbia campus will see a 3 percent hike.  And graduate students at Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla will pay 6 percent more next fall.

   St. Louis County Police Chief Tim Fitch is asking the FBI to help in the investigation of suspicious financial dealings at the county health department.  Chief Fitch has asked the FBI to conduct a forensic investigation into the financial records involving former health department administrator Ed Mueth.  

   County police are trying to determine if Mueth had co-conspirators when he allegedly used a bogus computer company to steal millions of dollars from the county before committing suicide.  

   Chief Fitch says his department has received hundreds of pages of subpoenaed records and wants to question dozens of people over Mueth's financial dealings.

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
HPV VACCINE FOR BOYS HAS 'GOOD START' IN 1ST YEAR

HPV VACCINE FOR BOYS HAS 'GOOD START' IN 1ST YEAR

ATLANTA (AP) -- When the HPV vaccine was first recommended for boys, health officials worried it would be an unusually hard sell. But a new report suggests that might not be the ca...

FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

   WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government wants to ban sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels under...

KIDS GET CODEINE IN ER DESPITE RISKS, GUIDELINES

KIDS GET CODEINE IN ER DESPITE RISKS, GUIDELINES

CHICAGO (AP) -- Despite recommended limits on codeine use in children, the potent painkiller is prescribed for children in at least half a million emergency room visits each yea...

GOLDEN YEARS SHORTER, SICKER IN SOUTHERN STATES

GOLDEN YEARS SHORTER, SICKER IN SOUTHERN STATES

ATLANTA (AP) -- If you're 65 and living in Hawaii, here's some good news: Odds are you'll live another 21 years. And for all but five of those years, you'll likely be in pretty goo...

SALMONELLA OUTBREAK LINKED TO NM POULTRY HATCHERY

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) -- A national outbreak of salmonella has been linked to an eastern New Mexico hatchery that sells live baby chickens, ducks and other poultry by mail and suppli...

REPORT: TEEN HPV VACCINATION RATE STILL LAGGING

REPORT: TEEN HPV VACCINATION RATE STILL LAGGING

ATLANTA (AP) -- Only about half of U.S. teenage girls have gotten a controversial cervical cancer vaccine - a rate that's changed little in three years. "We're dropping the ball...

FACE TRANSPLANT PATIENT CELEBRATES LIFE IN PUBLIC

FACE TRANSPLANT PATIENT CELEBRATES LIFE IN PUBLIC

BALTIMORE (AP) -- In the 15 years between a shotgun blast that ravaged the bottom half of Richard Norris' face and the face transplant that ended a hermit-like life for him, the ma...

REPORT: NATION'S KIDS NEED TO GET MORE PHYSICAL

REPORT: NATION'S KIDS NEED TO GET MORE PHYSICAL

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Reading, writing, arithmetic - and PE? The prestigious Institute of Medicine is recommending that schools provide opportunities for at least 60 minutes of phy...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved