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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

   Parents, local politicians and other are demanding to know why the Ferguson-Florissant School Board placed Superintendent Art McCoy on administrative leave.  

   About 1,500 gathered Wednesday night at McCluer North High School to demand answers from their school board.  Dozens spoke at the board meeting for more than three hours.  Some hurled allegations of racial motivations at the all white board.  McCoy is black.  

   Board President Paul Morris denies race was a factor.  He told the crowd that the issues revolved around McCoy's failure to comply with board directives.  Morris also told the crowd that he couldn't say more because privacy rules prevent him from being more specific in a personnel matter.  

   "This would be a whole lot easier if I could say what's going on," Morris told Fox 2 News, "but I can't."

   One parent told the board he planned to file a "Sunshine Law request" Thursday morning. 

   The board took no actions regarding McCoy's status at last night's meeting, but a decision on the superintendent's future is likely in the the next week or so.

 

   It looks like some of the projects planned as part of the $380 million renovation of the Arch grounds won't be finished in time for the Arch's 50th anniversary.  A construction timeline released Tuesday estimates that some of the work won't be done until six months later.  

   Project leaders tell the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that the delays stem from the complexity of the renovations and the number of projects involved.  

   The good news is that most of the work is projected to be done by the October 28, 2015 anniversary, including the park over the interstate.  But the northern trails to the riverfront won't be finished until December 2015, and the museum won't reopen until May, 2016. 

Lake Chesterfield woes continue

Monday, 11 November 2013 03:14 Published in Local News

   Residents in a Wildwood subdivision aren't sure if their lake will ever hold water.  

   Lake Chesterfield is empty again.  Major repairs were made in 2004 when the lake drained into a giant sink hole one night.  

   This time, subdivision trustees hired an engineering firm to lower the lake a little, in an effort to find the source of a slow leak.  But during the process, a valve stuck, and all of the water, and most of the fish, drained away according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.  

   It cost more than $600,000 to fix it last time.  And the subdivision is bound to fix it this time.  How it will cost this time isn't known.

   Subdivision trustees say the real problem is the limestone that lies beneath the man-made lake.

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