Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

   A death penalty case in St. Charles County is the first in more than a decade.  

   Sixty-three year old Terry Culberson is accused of shooting his ex-girlfriend, 55 year old Dorothy Hall in the face five times.  Her body was found inside Culberson's O'Fallon, Missouri mobile home on February 5, 2013.  

   St. Charles County Prosecutor Tim Lohmar says the brutality of the murder was a factor in deciding to ask for the death penalty. "St. Charles County has not requested a death penalty since 2002, so it's a very unique situation," he said.  

   Lohmar says Culberson's past conviction for assault with the intent to kill was also a factor.  A trial date has not yet been set.

 

Zoo-Museum Dist. looking for ways to raise funds

Tuesday, 01 October 2013 02:33 Published in Local News

   If the Zoo-Museum District doesn't expand to include more counties around the St. Louis metro area, visitors may have to start paying admission to visit the St. Louis Zoo, Art Museum and other cultural venues.  

   That's according to Zoo-Museum District Board member Charlie Valier.  With grand plans to expand the zoo across I-64/US-40, civic leaders are trying to find the best way to raise the hundreds of millions of dollars needed.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Valier told the board yesterday that there are three options to raise revenues:  Ask voters to raise the tax rates; Charge admission; or widen the Zoo-Museum District to include St. Charles, Jefferson and Franklin Counties in Missouri, and Madison and St. Clair Counties in Illinois.  

   Valier told the paper that six counties support cultural venues in the Denver area, and three support those in Detroit.

Monarch bans firefighters pink "breast cancer" tees

Tuesday, 01 October 2013 02:07 Published in Local News

   The firefighters in the Monarch Fire Protection District won't be pretty in pink for this year's breast cancer fundraiser.

   The bright pink tee-shirts they've worn during Breast Cancer Awareness Month for the last four years have been banned this year by the district board.  

   Two of the district's three board members told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that the shirts aren't professional and could lead to confusion among the public, since firefighters sell the tees to raise funds.  

   Firefighters say the move is political, since the shirts bear the firefighter's union logo.  

   Relations between the board and the International Association of Firefighters has been tense since the April board election.

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
REPORT: DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA ARE COMMON KILLERS

REPORT: DRUG-RESISTANT BACTERIA ARE COMMON KILLERS

ATLANTA (AP) -- For the first time, the government is estimating how many people die from drug-resistant bacteria each year - more than 23,000, or about as many as those killed ann...

SIUE bans E-cigarettes indoors

SIUE bans E-cigarettes indoors

   Smokers of electronic cigarettes will have to go outdoors like smokers of traditional tobacco products at one St. Louis area college campus.  The Belleville Ne...

STUDIES SHOW BIG PROMISE FOR HIV PREVENTION DRUG

STUDIES SHOW BIG PROMISE FOR HIV PREVENTION DRUG

Exciting research suggests that a shot every one to three months may someday give an alternative to the daily pills that some people take now to cu...

SURGERY, THERAPY BOTH PROVE GOOD FOR KNEE REPAIR

SURGERY, THERAPY BOTH PROVE GOOD FOR KNEE REPAIR

You might not want to rush into knee surgery. Physical therapy can be just as good for a common injury and at far less cost and risk, the most rigorous study to compare these treat...

FOOD COMPANIES CUT 6.4 TRILLION CALORIES

FOOD COMPANIES CUT 6.4 TRILLION CALORIES

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Some of the nation's largest food companies have cut calories in their products by more than 6.4 trillion, according to a new study. The study sponsored b...

ONLINE DELAYS SIGNAL STRONG DEMAND FOR HEALTH CARE

ONLINE DELAYS SIGNAL STRONG DEMAND FOR HEALTH CARE

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Overloaded websites and jammed phone lines frustrated consumers for a second day as they tried to sign up for health insurance under the nation's historic...

THE DOWN AND DIRTY ABOUT NERVE AGENTS LIKE SARIN

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Secretary of State John Kerry said Monday that evidence of a large-scale chemical weapons attack in Syria was "undeniable." There are still many questions about ...

ANGER, FEAR, TEARS NORMAL RESPONSE TO DISASTERS

ANGER, FEAR, TEARS NORMAL RESPONSE TO DISASTERS

BOSTON (AP) -- Kaitlyn Greeley burst into tears when a car backfired the other day. She's afraid to take her usual train to her job at a Boston hospital, walking or taking cabs ins...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved