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Another child abduction attempt reported in St. Ann

Tuesday, 18 March 2014 11:11 Published in Local News

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - St. Ann police are working on yet another reported attempted child abduction. It is the fifth reported attempt in the metro area in the last ten days.

 

Police in St. Charles County are already investigating incidents in O'Fallon, Lake St. Louis and West Alton, while Troy, Illinois authorities are searching for a supect after a child was approached there on Sunday.  

 

Fox 2 News reports that the latest incident happened around 8:25 Tuesday morning.  

 

The two suspects were reportedly in a maroon Chevy Malibu and are described as a white male with long grey hair and another white male with a grey crew cut.  

 

They were last seen in the area of St. Charles Rock Road and Ashby Road.

 

The child is safe.  St. Ann police have canvassed the area seeking leads.  Anyone with information is asked to contact the St. Ann police.

BOOKIES LIKE SOME NCAA SEEDS BETTER THAN OTHERS

Tuesday, 18 March 2014 09:20 Published in Sports

LAS VEGAS (AP) -- There will be 1,000 people lined up early Thursday morning to get a seat at the LVH sports book for the start of the NCAA tournament, and most of them don't care that Michigan State was somehow relegated to a No. 4 seed.

Oddsmakers in this gambling city are treating the Spartans like a No. 1 seed anyway. Their numbers show a team that will likely be favored against everyone except Florida, no matter what the NCAA selection committee thinks.

"We certainly can point out the committee flaws like no one else can," said Jay Kornegay, who runs the popular LVH sports book. "Michigan State is a 4 seed yet we have them as the second favorite to win it all. That doesn't make much sense to us."

Michigan State got more respect at the LVH than it did in the NCAA selection room, with oddsmakers making the Spartans a 9-2 pick to win it all, second only to Florida at 4-1. The odds might have even been better, but bookies figure the Spartans will have to work a little harder to make the Final Four from a No. 4 seeding than if they were seeded No. 1 or No. 2.

The same type of reasoning bumped the odds up slightly on Louisville (15-1) and Michigan (25-1) because they must come out of a brutal Midwest region loaded with contenders.

"The Midwest region is one of the toughest regions we've ever seen," Kornegay said. "In my opinion it might be the toughest region of all time."

The seedings don't necessarily match their power ratings, but there's plenty for the bookies to like about this year's tournament. Thousands of people will jam sports books the first four days of play in a betting frenzy unmatched by anything other than the Super Bowl, and they will bring fistfuls of cash.

And without a dominant favorite, the sports books figure to do well.

"People every year talk about a tournament that is wide open, which to me is one where eight to 10 teams have a chance," said Johnny Avello, the book director at the Wynn resort. "Unpredictability is the stuff that the books love and this is one year we don't have one team anyone can say will win it hands down."

Among relative equals at the top, though, one team is more equal than the rest. Florida is not only the No. 1 team in the AP Top 25 poll, but the odds-on pick at books up and down the Las Vegas Strip.

Avello said he lowered Florida to 3-1 because he has taken a lot of money on the Gators since first posting odds on them last April. Helping, he said, was a favorable bracket in the South that gives Florida a clear path to the Final Four.

"The favorite should be a team capable of winning that has the easiest route," Avello said. "And Florida has the easiest route, no question about it."

Florida is a 5-1 favorite in consensus odds compiled by RJ Bell, who does handicapping for Pregame.com. Bell lists Michigan State second at 6-1 among the 21 teams with odds of better than 100-1.

Louisville is another favorite of the oddsmakers that didn't get the seed they might have expected. The Cardinals must come out of the Midwest region as a No. 4 seed to make the Final Four, but there's a good chance they will be favored in every game they play in their region.

That's because the Vegas bookies, unlike the NCAA, put emphasis on recent play as more of a predictor of success than an entire season. Like Michigan State, Louisville finished strong in winning its conference tournament and looks ready to make a run.

"I was looking at a possible No. 1 for them," Avello said. "When I saw No. 4 I thought it was low for a team playing so well that is the defending champion. But that's what the committee does, I can't get involved with that."

Not much of a chance of that, though the pairings would be different if the bookies had their way.

"The committee guys ought to get some book guys involved," Avello said. "We'd get the brackets together."

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

It won't be nearly as much fun as eating candy bars, but a big study is being launched to see if pills containing the nutrients in dark chocolate can help prevent heart attacks and strokes.

The pills are so packed with nutrients that you'd have to eat a gazillion candy bars to get the amount being tested in this study, which will enroll 18,000 men and women nationwide.

"People eat chocolate because they enjoy it," not because they think it's good for them, and the idea of the study is to see whether there are health benefits from chocolate's ingredients minus the sugar and fat, said Dr. JoAnn Manson, preventive medicine chief at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

The study will be the first large test of cocoa flavanols, which in previous smaller studies improved blood pressure, cholesterol, the body's use of insulin, artery health and other heart-related factors.

A second part of the study will test multivitamins to help prevent cancer. Earlier research suggested this benefit but involved just older, unusually healthy men. Researchers want to see if multivitamins lower cancer risk in a broader population.

The study will be sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Mars Inc., maker of M&M's and Snickers bars. The candy company has patented a way to extract flavanols from cocoa in high concentration and put them in capsules. Mars and some other companies sell cocoa extract capsules, but with less active ingredient than those that will be tested in the study; candy contains even less.

"You're not going to get these protective flavanols in most of the candy on the market. Cocoa flavanols are often destroyed by the processing," said Manson, who will lead the study with Howard Sesso at Brigham and others at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.

Participants will get dummy pills or two capsules a day of cocoa flavanols for four years, and neither they nor the study leaders will know who is taking what during the study. The flavanol capsules are coated and have no taste, said Manson, who tried them herself.

In the other part of the study, participants will get dummy pills or daily multivitamins containing a broad range of nutrients.

Participants will be recruited from existing studies, which saves money and lets the study proceed much more quickly, Manson said, although some additional people with a strong interest in the research may be allowed to enroll. The women will come from the Women's Health Initiative study, the long-running research project best known for showing that menopause hormone pills might raise heart risks rather than lower them as had long been thought. Men will be recruited from other large studies.

Manson also is leading a government-funded study testing vitamin D pills in 26,000 men and women. Results are expected in three years.

People love vitamin supplements but "it's important not to jump on the bandwagon" and take pills before they are rigorously tested, she warned.

"More is not necessarily better," and research has shown surprising harm from some nutrients that once looked promising, she said.

---

Marilynn Marchione can be followed at HTTP://TWITTER.COM/MMARCHIONEAP

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

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