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St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A new survey labels a St. Louis company as one of the world's most admired companies.

 

Fortune Magazine named Monsanto as the #2 company in its industry. The list is made using feedback from company surveys as well as peer ratings from executives and analysts.

 

This is the second nationwide award for Monsanto this month--last week MIT named them one of the 50 smartest companies. 

Published in Local News

   CHESTERFIELD, Mo. (AP) - A $400 million expansion announced by Monsanto in April is starting in earnest with a ceremonial groundbreaking at the Chesterfield research center site.

   The agricultural products company says it expects to bring 675 new jobs to the region over the next three years.

   Gov. Jay Nixon was scheduled to join Monsanto officials at the ceremony Tuesday, just as he did when the company first unveiled the project at an international biotechnology conference in Chicago.

   The Missouri Department of Economic Development has said Monsanto can expect to receive more than $31 million in state tax incentives if it creates the expected number of new jobs.

 
Published in Local News
Monday, 14 October 2013 09:15

Monsanto HQ target of weekend protest

CREVE COEUR, Mo. (AP) - The world headquarters of agriculture company Monsanto was the site of a weekend demonstration organized by opponents of genetically modified food.

 

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (bit.ly/1cg8Kro) reports that 500 demonstrators marched to the company's Creve Coeur global headquarters, where they chanted anti-Monsanto slogans and waded into street traffic Saturday.

 

   Organizers of the "March Against Monsanto" want the company to label food containing genetically modified ingredients.

 

   Monsanto released a statement before the protest in which it highlighted its "contribution to improving agriculture by helping farmers produce more from their land while conserving natural resources such as water and energy."

 
Published in Local News

BERLIN (AP) - The European Union is urging its 27 member states to test certain wheat shipments from the United States after unauthorized genetically modified grains were found on a U.S. farm, officials said Friday.

The move came after Japan halted imports Thursday of some types of wheat from the U.S. following the discovery of an experimental strain that was tested by St. Louis-based Monsanto but was never approved.
 
"The Commission is following carefully the presence of this non-authorized GM wheat in Oregon in order to ensure that European consumers are protected from any unauthorized GM presence and make sure that the EU zero tolerance for such GM events is implemented," EU's consumer protection office said.
 
The agency said it was seeking "further information and reassurance" from U.S. authorities and had asked Monsanto for help in developing a reliable test for GM grains in soft white wheat.
 
 Shipments that test positive should not be sold, but current information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration indicated the wheat posed no threat to human health, it said.
   
The European Union imports more than 1 million metric tons (1.1 million tons) of U.S. wheat each year. Eighty percent of that was soft white wheat, the majority of which is exported to Spain, officials said.
 
European consumers have generally objected more strongly to genetically modified foodstuffs than Americans.
 
Published in Local News

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Protests against seed giant Monsanto are getting under way across the U.S. and in dozens of other countries.

"March Against Monsanto" organizers say they're calling attention to the dangers posed by genetically modified food and the companies that produce it. Protests were planned in more than 250 cities Saturday.

Genetically modified plants are grown from seeds engineered to resist insecticides and herbicides, add nutritional benefits and improve crop yields.

Some believe they can lead to health problems and harm the environment. Opponents have pushed for mandatory labeling in California and worldwide, and have also accused the company of suing farmers when GMO seeds are blown into non-GMO fields. The federal government and many scientists say the technology is safe.

St. Louis-based Monsanto said Saturday that it respects people's rights to express their opinion, but believes its seeds help farmers produce more food, while conserving water and energy.

Published in Local News

The Supreme Court unanimously agreed with Monsanto, that and elderly Indiana farmer infringed on the company's patent.

The high court ruled that 75-year-old Vernon Bowman illegally used some of the biotech company's Roundup-resistant soybeans to grow a new crop. Bowman argued that he bought the seeds through a third party. He said the company had abandoned their patent-protected seeds by allowing them to be mixed-in with non-patented seeds.

Experts say this is a victory for inventors who create self-replicating products--like computer software. the ruling will protect their intellectual property. Still, consumers could end up paying higher food prices--farmers will pass on the higher cost of Monsanto's seeds to customers.

Published in Local News

WASHINGTON (AP) - Monsanto says its net income increased 22 percent in the second quarter on strong sales of its biotech seeds.

 

The agricultural products company boosted its full-year earnings guidance, citing its strong performance in the first two quarters.

 

The St. Louis company says it earned $1.48 billion, or $2.74 per share in the three months ended Feb. 13. That compares to earnings of $1.21 billion, or $2.24 per share, a year ago.

 

Revenue climbed 15 percent to $5.47 billion.

 

Analysts polled by FactSet expected Monsanto to report earnings of $2.56 per share on sales of $5.27 billion in revenue for the quarter.

 

Monsanto has dominated the bioengineered-seed business for more than a decade. In recent years the company has focused on growing business in emerging markets like Argentina, Brazil and other Latin American countries.

 
Published in Local News
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments today in Creve Coeur-based Monsanto's soybean patent claim. The biotech giant will argue that the patent for Roundup Ready soybeans extends to the offspring of the beans.

The case dates back to 2007, when Monsanto sued an Indiana farmer for planting the progeny of the patented beans. Monsanto won in U.S. District Court, and in the U.S. Court of Appeals. But that farmer, 75 year old Vernon Hugh Bowman has appealed to the high court.

Court watchers say this case has implications beyond genetically modified seeds, extending to other new technologies.

Briefs from Monsanto supporters, like the University of Missouri and Microsoft argue that a decision against Monsanto would have a chilling effect on innovation. Bowman's supporters argue that that would extend patent claims to an unreasonable length.
Published in Local News

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