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BOSTON (AP) — Authorities say Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev faces a 15-count state indictment related to the death of a police officer and a police shootout.

That's in addition to a 30-count federal indictment returned by a federal grand jury Thursday.

U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz and state officials said at a news conference that they're thinking of the three people killed and 260 people injured when two bombs exploded April 15 near the finish line.

Authorities say the suspects later shot Massachusetts Institute of Technology officer Sean Collier in his cruiser and tried to steal his gun.

Tsarnaev was indicted Thursday on federal charges for which he could get the death penalty. His attorney has declined to comment.

His brother was killed in the shootout with police April 19.

Published in National News

BOSTON (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union and the public defender's office have raised concerns about investigators' plans to interrogate the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect without reading him his Miranda rights.

The Massachusetts Federal Public Defender's office says it will take the case of 19-year-old bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-KHAR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv). Public defender Miriam Conrad says there are "serious issues" regarding the interrogation.

ACLU Executive Director Anthony Romero says the legal exception applies only when there is a continued threat and is not open-ended.

It's not clear when Tsarnaev will be able to answer questions. He's hospitalized in serious condition and under heavy guard after being arrested Friday night following a daylong manhunt punctuated by gunfire.

Published in National News

   WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) - Police say one of two suspects in the shooting of an MIT police officer is dead and a massive manhunt is underway for another, who is tied to the Boston Marathon bombing.

   Shortly after the MIT officer was shot Thursday night, police got a report of a carjacking in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

   Police say of the at-large suspect, "We believe this to be a terrorist."

   The FBI is investigating whether the fatal shooting of a campus police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and gunfire and explosions in a nearby town are related to the Boston Marathon bombings.

   A Massachusetts State Police spokesman said early Friday that one person suspected in the gunfire and explosions has been accounted for and one is at large.

   The FBI said it is working with local authorities to determine what happened.

   The MIT shooting on the Cambridge campus Thursday night was followed by reports of violence in nearby Watertown, about 10 miles west of Boston.

   State police spokesman David Procopio said there is a "strong possibility" the incidents are related.

   The MIT officer had been responding to report of a disturbance Thursday night when he was shot multiple times, according to a statement from the Middlesex district attorney's office and Cambridge police. It said there were no other victims.

   In Watertown, witnesses reported hearing multiple gunshots and explosions at about 1 a.m. Friday. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents were in the neighborhood and a helicopter circled overhead.

   State police spokesman David Procopio said, "The incident in Watertown did involve what we believe to be explosive devices possibly, potentially, being used against the police officers."

   Boston cab driver Imran Sais said he was standing on a street corner at a police barricade across from a diner when he heard an explosion.

   "I heard a loud boom and then a rapid succession of pop, pop, pop," he said. "It sounded like automatic weapons. And then I heard the second explosion."

   He said he could smell something burning and advanced to check it out but area residents at their windows yelled at him, "Hey, it's gunfire! Don't go that way!"

   MIT said right after the 10:30 p.m. shooting that police were sweeping the campus in Cambridge and urged people to remain indoors. They urged people urged to stay away from the Stata Building, a mixed-use building with faculty offices, classrooms and a common area.

   Hours later, MIT, which has about 11,000 students, said the campus was clear but the shooter was still on the loose.

   

Published in National News

   BOSTON (ABC) - The death toll in the Boston Marathon bombings has increased to three people, according to the Boston Police commissioner.

   Among the dead was an 8-year-old boy, law enforcement sources told ABC News. The Boston Globe identifies the dead child as Martin Richard.

   "This cowardly act will not be taken within stride," Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said this evening. "We will turn every rock over to find the people who are responsible for this."

   At least 133 people were injured, including several children with severe trauma, when bombs exploded almost simultaneously near the marathon finish line, police said.

   Doctors at two Massachusetts hospitals said some of the victims underwent amputations and were suffering from burns, while others had sustained injuries from shrapnel to their lower extremities.

   "Everything we saw was ordinary material that could have been propelled by the device," said Dr. Ron Walls, chair of emergency medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

FBI Taking Charge of Investigation

   The FBI has taken the lead in the investigation and at a news conference tonight said there are no suspects in custody.

   Despite reports of law enforcement officials questioning a potential person of interest at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where many of the injured were taken, Davis urged caution.

   "There's no suspect at Brigham and Women's Hospital," Davis said. "There are people we are talking to, but no suspect."

   ABC News can confirm that one of the people law enforcement officials are talking to is a 20-year-old Saudi national at a Boston hospital. Sources tell ABC News that he is here legally on a student visa and that his visa is clean with no apparent criminal history.

   Boston police tonight, at a news conference, said that there are people they are talking to, but no suspects.

   Two bombs exploded near the race finish line on Boylston Street shortly before 3 p.m. The area was crowded with runners and spectators, and thousands of runners were still completing the race.

   Davis declined to say whether he thought the devices were acts of terrorism, but said, "You can reach your own conclusion based on what happened."

   According to law enforcement sources, the first bomb exploded at the Marathon Sports running store and blew out windows in four nearby buildings, injuring 15 to 20 individuals. The second blast occurred about 50 to 100 yards away, severely injuring more bystanders, Davis said.

   The working theory about the bombs among Massachusetts law enforcement is that they were small, crudely made devices hidden in bags or backpacks, planted either during the race or immediately prior and detonated remotely, possibly with a cellphone. Officials have subpoenaed cellphone records.

   More than 400 National Guardsmen in attendance at the marathon helped secure a perimeter around the scene.

   One witness described the scene as being like a "war zone," while a doctor who was standing nearby said he immediately started treating people with severe leg injuries.

   "Six or so people went down right away on my left, mostly with leg injuries. One gentleman had both legs below the knee blown off," Dr. Allan Panter, a physician who witnessed the event, told ABC News. "One girl I treated, I could not find any obvious injury to her torso, but she arrested. She was between 24 and 30.

   "The people had singed facial hair and stuff. Most of the injuries were on their legs," Panter said. "I was 20 feet away, one storefront down. My ears were ringing. Everything blew out from the storefront."

   Police initially said a third explosion occurred at John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, but later said it was related to a fire. No one was injured at the library, police said.

   The Federal Aviation Administration issued a temporary flight restriction over the area of the explosion.

   Police were asking for all video footage of the finish line at the time of the explosion.

   An emergency room doctor at Massachusetts General Hospital told ABC News that the hospital had performed several amputations, particularly on victims whose legs were injured. Many of the victims were runners still wearing numbers on their shirts, the doctor said.

   He described the injuries as "shrapnel-type wounds" possibly caused by "pipe bombs," though police have not confirmed that description.

   Earlier, a trauma nurse from Massachusetts General Hospital told ABC News that medical workers had set up a temporary morgue at a medical tent at the road race and were treating patients with severed limbs and children with severe burns.

   In the immediate aftermath of the explosions, Boston EMS personnel could be seen shuttling the injured out of the blast area on wheelchairs. Several of the victims were bleeding from the face.

   A doctor who was in the medical tent about 150 yards away from the explosion said it looked like a "war zone," with "lots of blood," and said that all physicians were told to go to the scene and help the injured.

   Boston police set off a third explosion before 4 p.m. and were sweeping the area, checking dozens of bags left behind by runners who evacuated the area after the explosions. Officials also tested for chemicals to help determine what kind of device was used, according to police.

   Attorney General Eric Holder was in touch with the FBI in Boston and President Obama was notified of the blasts. All of Boston's police force was ordered to report to duty.

   Security precautions were taken elsewhere beyond Boston. In Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House was closed to pedestrians and there was heightened security.

   In Boston, police told people in area of the blasts to avoid trash cans, according to witnesses.

   The explosions erupted on what is usually a festive day in Boston. It is designated Patriots Day and most offices are closed for the celebration and the marathon.

   Debris from the explosions could be seen scattered throughout the spectators' stands and finish line area of the marathon as emergency personnel cleared the area.

   Video of the explosions showed plumes of white smoke pouring into the air above the street where runners were.

   More than 26,00 runners were registered to compete in this year's marathon. The marathon clock was at shortly after four hours at the time of the explosions, which is the average time it takes runners to complete the Boston race, potentially putting the greatest number of competitors at risk.

 
Published in National News

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - Gov. Pat Quinn says he has reached out to the Illinois Emergency Management Agency after explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon killed two and injured many others.

He says nothing suggests there any connections to Illinois or Chicago. But the Chicago Democrat says Illinois must be on the alert.

Quinn characterized the explosions as "a potential terrorist incident" but said more facts need to come out.

Federal officials say two bombs exploded near the finish line of the marathon on Monday. Two people died and.

Quinn says he has directed all state public safety agencies, including Illinois State Police, Illinois Department of Military Affairs and the State Fire Marshal to be ready to assist and remain vigilant. He also asks Illinoisans to report anything suspicious.

Published in Local News
NEW YORK (AP) - A senior al-Qaida leader and son-in-law of Osama bin Laden has pleaded not guilty to plotting against Americans in his role as the terror network's spokesman.

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith entered the plea through a lawyer to one count of conspiracy to kill Americans in federal court in New York on Friday.

Prosecutors say Abu Ghaith praised the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and warned there would be more.

Abu Ghaith was born in Kuwait. Authorities say he was captured in Jordan over the last week.

President Barack Obama's administration has sought to charge senior al-Qaida suspects in American federal courts instead of military tribunals, but Republicans in Congress don't want high-threat terror suspects brought into the United States.
Published in National News

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