Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

 
 
 
Colin Jeffery

Colin Jeffery

Five things to know about Missouri's same-sex marriage ban

Wednesday, 12 February 2014 15:19 Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit Wednesday seeking to force Missouri to recognize same-sex marriages performed in states or countries that allow them. Here are five things to know about Missouri's law.
 
   ---
 
   CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT: Missouri voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment - with 70 percent support - in August 2004 that prohibits same-sex marriage. The measure states: "That to be valid and recognized in this state, a marriage shall exist only between a man and a woman." Missouri was a trailblazer of sorts, becoming the first state to enact such an amendment after the Massachusetts high court permitted gay marriage there. Other states adopted similar measures in subsequent years.
   ---
 
   MISSOURI HIGH COURT: Last October, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled against a man seeking state survivor benefits after his same-sex partner, Highway Patrol Cpl. Dennis Engelhard, was killed while working in 2009. Missouri's law governing state survivor benefits defines marriage as between a man and a woman. The state's high court said Kelly Glossip was ineligible for the benefits because he was not married to Glossip.
   ---
 
   EXECUTIVE ACTION: In November, Democratic Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced that he was directing state tax officials to accept joint tax returns filed by same-sex couples who were legally married elsewhere. Nixon noted that Missouri's tax code is tied to the federal one, and that federal officials had recently decided to allow legally married gay couples to file joint federal tax returns. Officials from the Missouri Baptist Convention were among several plaintiffs who sued in January contending that Nixon's policy violates the Missouri Constitution. Some Republican state House members have filed articles of impeachment against Nixon because of the policy, though no hearings have been held.
   ---
 
   DISCRIMINATION LAWS: Missouri law does not currently prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation. The state Senate, on the final day of the 2013 session, passed a measure that would have added sexual orientation to a list of anti-discrimination categories that already includes race, color, gender, religion and disabilities. But the bill never was considered by the House. Nixon has called for passage of the measure this year, but no legislative hearings have been held on it.
   ---
 
   GAY FOOTBALL PLAYER: The ACLU's lawsuit isn't the first significant event in Missouri this week pertaining to gay rights and discrimination. Michael Sam, an All-American football player at the University of Missouri, publicly announced he is gay. Sam is preparing for the National Football League draft, and if he makes a team, he could become the first openly gay NFL player.

Second teen dies after Tuesday afternoon accident

Wednesday, 12 February 2014 15:14 Published in Local News

A second teen has died after a car crash Tuesday afternoon.

 

Police say that 15-year-old Darius Clay and 17-year-old Martez Edwards were in a speeding car when the driver lost control and crashed into a tree on Euclid in North St. Louis. Police later learned the car they were in had been stolen. The owner had started the car and gone back inside to allow the vehicle time to warm up.

 

Police say a third passenger left the scene of the accident before emergency crews arrived.

Missouri ending some diesel fuel inspections

Wednesday, 12 February 2014 15:14 Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri is curtailing inspections aimed at people who may illegally use farm diesel fuel in their over-the-road vehicles.
 
In response to concerns from lawmakers, acting Revenue Department Director John Mollenkamp said Wednesday that his agency would stop proactively looking for violations of the diesel fuel law and only respond to requests from law enforcement officials.
 
Missouri imposes a 17-cent tax on diesel fuel. But that tax is not charged on diesel used only for farming purposes. To distinguish between the two uses, farm diesel fuel is mixed with a dye.
 
The Revenue Department had been doing random inspections to see whether dyed fuel was being used in vehicles driven on highways.
 
Republican Sen. Mike Parson, a former Polk County sheriff, has called the program an unreasonable search of private property.

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

UPDATE: Missing Belleville boy found safe

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - UPDATE: Good news for a Belleville father, his 11-year-old son has been found safe.   A SARAA Alert was issued Wednesday morning for DeA...

Universities examine bans of 'selfies' at graduations

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - It may be coming to a college near you.......with graduation season upon us, bans on selfies are being suggested.   Two universities are the ...

Boeing offers buyouts to some St. Louis workers

Boeing offers buyouts to some St. Louis workers

(ST. LOUIS, AP) — The Boeing Co. is offering buyouts to some of its nonunion employees in the St. Louis region. The company on Tuesday sent an email to 12,000 workers an...

PRO-RUSSIAN INSURGENTS HOLD US JOURNALIST CAPTIVE

PRO-RUSSIAN INSURGENTS HOLD US JOURNALIST CAPTIVE

DONETSK, Ukraine (AP) — Pro-Russian gunmen in eastern Ukraine admitted on Wednesday that they are holding an American journalist, saying he was suspected of unspecified "bad act...

OBAMA OPENS JAPAN TRIP AT FAMOUS SUSHI RESTAURANT

OBAMA OPENS JAPAN TRIP AT FAMOUS SUSHI RESTAURANT

TOKYO (AP) — President Barack Obama on Wednesday opened a four-country Asia tour aimed at reassuring allies in the region that the U.S. remains a committed economic, military an...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved