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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

Systemic personnel problems seen in nuclear corps

Thursday, 30 January 2014 02:41 Published in National News
   WASHINGTON (AP) — A widening cheating scandal within the Air Force's nuclear missile corps is revealing systemic personnel problems in the force and is setting off high-level meetings to search for solutions.
   For the first time, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel summoned 15 of his top Air Force, Navy and nuclear mission leaders to the Pentagon, where they worked Wednesday to figure out whether cultural problems within the nuclear force make launch officers feel more compelled to cheat on their proficiency tests.
   Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said the officials spent the bulk of the meeting discussing the breadth of the problems, which include low morale, cheating and serious security lapses, and how to begin solving them.
   "I think the general consensus in the room was that we all need to accept the reality that there probably are systemic issues in the personnel growth and development inside the nuclear mission," Kirby told Pentagon reporters after the two-hour meeting with Hagel. "The secretary made it clear at the end of the meeting that he intends to do these on a regular basis."
   The cheating scandal is the latest revelation in a growing morass of problems among the men and women who maintain and staff the nation's nuclear missiles.
   The number of officers in the nuclear corps who have been implicated in a cheating investigation has more than doubled to at least 70, officials said Tuesday. That means that at least 14 percent of all launch officers have been decertified and suspended from missile launch duties.
   All are at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., which is responsible for 150 Minuteman 3 nuclear missiles, or one-third of the entire Minuteman 3 force. The officials who disclosed the higher number spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to disclose the information by name while the investigation is ongoing.
   It wasn't immediately clear whether the additional airmen suspected of being involved in cheating on proficiency tests are alleged to have participated in the cheating directly or were involved indirectly.
   The meeting Wednesday included the heads of the Air Force and Navy nuclear weapons organizations, as well as U.S. Strategic Command, which is responsible for nuclear war planning and for oversight of the nuclear forces.
   The Air Force announced on Jan. 15 that while it was investigating possible criminal drug use by some airmen, it discovered that one missile officer at Malmstrom had shared test questions with 16 other officers. It said another 17 admitted to knowing about this cheating but did not report it. The 34 officers had their security clearances suspended and they were taken off missile launch duty.
   The Air Force has 450 intercontinental ballistic missiles, or ICBMs, on alert at all times, with a contingent of about 500 launch control officers, some number of which are unavailable on any given day due to illness or other reasons. So the number temporarily unavailable for duty because of the cheating scandal is substantial. It's not clear how that affects the mission, beyond requiring the remaining crew members to bear a bigger share of the work.
   Each day, a total of 90 officers work in pairs inside 45 underground launch control centers, with each center monitoring and controlling a group of 10 ICBMs. They work 24-hour shifts in the missile field and then return to their base. They generally do as many as eight of these shifts per month.
   The tests in question are designed to ensure proficiency by launch officers in handling "emergency war orders," which involve the classified processing of orders received through their chain of command to launch a missile. These written tests are in addition to two other types of monthly testing on the missile system and on launch codes.
   Malmstrom is home to the 341st Missile Wing, which is one of three ICBM groups. The other two are in North Dakota and Wyoming.

   A young Missouri woman who confessed to killing a 9 year old neighbor girl, when she herself was a juvenile, wants a judge to set aside her guilty plea.  Alyssa Bustamante was 15 year old in the 2009 when Elizabeth Olten was killed.  

   The Missouri teen had pleaded guilty in 2012 to second degree murder and given a life sentence with the chance for parole.  A first-degree murder conviction would have meant a mandatory life sentence without parole.

   The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled that juveniles can't face mandatory life sentences, so Bustamante wants to change her plea.  She's expected to tell a judge Thursday that she wouldn't have pleaded guilty without the threat of mandatory life imprisonment.  

   The University of Missouri will hire outside, independent legal counsel to investigate the school's handling of matters related to former Mizzou student Sasha Menu Courey.  The swimmer committed suicide in 2011, 16 months after claiming she'd been raped by members of the Missouri football team.  

   The University of Missouri Board of Curators voted Wednesday night to approve the recommendation of University President Tim Wolfe, to hire an independent investigator.  The board has not yet chosen a firm, but stipulated that it must have independence from the university.  

   The board wants the inquiry completed in time for the board's next meeting in Rolla on April 11th.

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