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ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — As the technology to print 3-D firearms advances, a federal law that banned such guns is about to expire.

U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer says he's seeking an extension of the law before it expires Dec. 9.

He says the technology of so-called 3-D printing has advanced to the point anyone with $1,000 and an Internet connection can access the plastic parts that can be fitted into a gun. That weapon can't be detected by metal detectors or X-ray machines.

Schumer says that means anyone can download a gun cheaply, then take the weapons anywhere, including high-security areas.

The Democrat is pushing the extension along with Sens. Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Bill Nelson of Florida.

Published in National News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A Missouri judge has struck down a pair of new laws that had limited the ability of cities and counties to regulate cellphone towers.

Cole County Circuit Judge Patricia Joyce ruled that lawmakers violated procedural requirements of the state constitution when passing the bills earlier this year.

She said the bills' title of "relating to telecommunications" did not encompass everything in the bills. She noted that one bill also contained provisions related to railroad crossings and utility rights-of-way. Another bill contained provisions related to cable TV services, which she said are not legally the same as telecommunications.

Joyce also said lawmakers had changed the bills' original purpose.

Gov. Jay Nixon and legislative leaders had touted the legislation as a way to encourage expansion of high-speed Internet and wireless phone service.

Published in Local News

   Governor Jay Nixon's veto of a controversial gun rights measure will stand.  

   The override of HB-436 had passed the Missouri House 109-49 Wednesday afternoon, but the override attempt fell a single vote short in the Senate Wednesday night (22-12).  

   The legislation declared that any federal policies that "infringe on the people's right to keep and bear arms" shall be invalid in Missouri.  It would have allow state charges to be brought against federal authorities who attempted to enforce federal gun laws.

   After the Senate vote Wednesday night, Nixon issues a statement applauding the Senate's action to sustain his veto of a bill he called "unnecessary, unconstitutional and unsafe."

 

Published in Local News

NEW YORK (AP) - A federal appeals court says prosecutors can't use a defendant's request for a lawyer as evidence of guilt.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York noted Monday that it was touching new legal ground as it ruled against the government in a case prosecuted in Albany, N.Y.

The appeals court has ordered a new trial for a man convicted of charges relating to illegally bringing an alien into the United States. The case involved the arrest of a U.S. citizen who had tried to enter the country with a German citizen in 2010 near Buffalo, N.Y.

The appeals court says prosecutors unfairly used the U.S. citizen's request for an attorney as evidence of his guilt.

Published in National News

ST. LOUIS (AP) - A federal judge is rejecting a legal bid by gun-rights advocates who wanted people to be able to immediately carry firearms in Illinois under the state's new concealed carry law.

East St. Louis U.S. District Judge William Stiehl threw out the lawsuit filed by Mary Shepard and the Illinois State Rifle Association, siding with the state and saying the legal action is moot.

Shepard and the rifle group had argued it was unconstitutional to make people wait for the permit process to be outlined under the new concealed carry law that lawmakers passed July 9.

Illinois was the last state in the nation to ban the practice.

Illinois State Police have 180 days to set up a program before accepting applications, plus another 90 days to process the forms.

 

Published in Local News

BELLEVILLE, Ill. (AP) - A judge in southwestern Illinois is considering an AIDS service organization's challenge of a city's decision to bar the group from running a needle-exchange program because of a zoning issue.

The Belleville News-Democrat reports that St. Clair County Circuit Judge Robert Haida took the matter under advisement after a hearing Monday. The judge will issue a written ruling.

The city sued in February, believing Bethany Place's needle-exchange program violates the type of operations allowed for that site under the city's zoning codes.

Bethany Place responded last month, arguing the city waited too long to complain.

The organization calls the city's move unfair and prejudicial to clients served by the program.

 

Published in Local News

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation authorizing tax incentives for big-time sports events and some charitable donations.

<br><br>

Nixon highlighted his support for the charitable tax breaks by traveling to a food bank in Cape Girardeau on Friday. He signed the sports incentives without comment.

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The sports legislation authorizes up to $3 million of tax credits annually for organizations that host amateur sporting events such as NCAA tournaments or Olympic trials. Lawmakers hope the cash will help Missouri compete with other states.

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The other bill reinstates tax credits for donations to food pantries, child advocacy centers and pregnancy resource centers that had expired in recent years. Nixon says the tax credits can leverage private donations to help "our most vulnerable citizens."

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Both bills were passed by the Legislature on March 13.

Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A mother, father and grandmother who all grieved over the deaths of infants have testified on Missouri legislation to limit the number of young children who can be watched in home day cares.

The bill presented Tuesday before a House committee would change a Missouri law that exempts the relatives of child-care providers from being counted toward the requirements for state licensure. The bill would require licensure for anyone watching more than four children of preschool age or younger, so long as they are being paid for watching at least one of those children.

The bill is called "Nathan's Law," in remembrance of a suburban St. Louis baby who died in 2007 in a home day care. Nathan's mother, Shelley Blecha, was among those testifying for the bill.
Published in Local News
Monday, 18 March 2013 17:48

O'Fallon debates gun law

O'FALLON, Mo. (AP) — The city council in a St. Louis area town is considering a bill that would declare any federal, state or local laws prohibiting guns to be in violation of the U.S. and Missouri constitutions, rendering them invalid in the town.

The measure has been proposed in O'Fallon. The Suburban Journals of Greater St. Louis reports it could be subject of a vote on March 28.

Co-sponsors Jim Pepper and John Haman Jr. say the bill would not invalidate existing laws but protect the rights of residents to bear arms. But Councilman Bob Howell questioned the need for the bill and urged major revisions. Howell says that while he supports protecting gun rights, he believes the bill puts the city in the position of passing an unconstitutional law.
Published in Local News
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A federal judge has struck down a Missouri health insurance law because it conflicts with a federal mandate for insurers to cover birth control at no additional cost to women.

U.S. District Judge Audrey Fleissig cited a provision in the U.S. Constitution declaring that federal laws take precedence over contradictory state laws. Missouri's Republican-led Legislature overrode the veto of Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon last September to enact a law that appeared to be the first in the nation to directly rebut the Obama administration's contraception policy. The Missouri law required insurers to issue policies without contraception coverage if individuals or employers objected because of religious or moral beliefs.

Fleissig had issued a temporary restraining order against Missouri's law last December.
Published in Local News
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