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Homicide and child abuse detectives are investigating the death of a young child.

 

Emergency crews were called to a north St. Louis home around 3:30 this morning on reports that a one-year-old girl was having health problems. When paramedics arrived the girl had no heart beat and was not breathing. They performed CPR and transported her to the hospital, where she was pronounced dead.

 

Investigators are still at the home, but no further details have been released.

Published in Local News
Monday, 10 February 2014 07:23

Two children dead after house fire

Two children are dead and two others hurt after house fire in North County Monday morning.

 

Fire crews were called to a home on Airport Road just east of I-270 in Berkeley areound 5:30 this morning. After the blaze was extinguished, firefighters searched the home and found the children dead in the house.

 

A third child and an adult were taken to the hospital in unknown condition.

 

Authorities have no identified the victims and the cause of the fire is unclear. 

Published in Local News

A tragic afternoon for a Franklin County family.

 

Police are investigating after an 8-year-old boy died on a school bus Monday afternoon. Investigators say Bradley Voss collapsed on the bus around 3:45 yesterday. The bus driver performed CPR until emergency crews arrived. Voss was taken to the hospital where he died. School officials say the boy showed no signs of illness through the day before he collapsed.

 

No foul play is suspected in the death and an autopsy is planned. 

Published in Local News
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - An autopsy has revealed that a San Francisco Bay Area transit officer who was shot and killed by a fellow officer died of a single gunshot wound to the chest.
 
   The results of the autopsy on Bay Area Rapid Transit police Sgt. Tom Smith were released Thursday by the Alameda County Sheriff's Office.
 
   Smith was wearing a bulletproof vest, but Sheriff's spokesman J.D. Nelson said the bullet struck an area that was not covered.
 
   The 42-year-old Smith was shot Tuesday while authorities searched a one-bedroom apartment in Dublin for items stolen during an armed holdup at a train station in Oakland.
   Investigators are trying to determine whether the officer's gun discharged accidentally or he mistook Smith for someone else.
Published in National News
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - A spring golf tournament is being planned to help the family of a Smithville man who died after an altercation at Arrowhead Stadium.
 
The Kyle Van Winkle golf classic will be held May 5 at Meadowbrook Golf & Country Club in Prairie Village, Kan.
 
The 30-year-old Van Winkle died Dec. 1 after he was beaten in an Arrowhead parking lot during a Chiefs game. Court documents say Van Winkle was injured after he was found in a stranger's vehicle. Van Winkle apparently got into a vehicle that looked like the one he rode to the game in.
 
He left behind a widow and 7-week-old son.
 
His death was ruled a homicide but no one has been charged.
Published in Local News
Tuesday, 21 January 2014 02:27

Randolph Co. man dies in farm accident

   A Randolph County man is dead after an apparent accident on his family's farm, just east of Red Bud, Illinois.   Emergency crews were called to the 6900 block of Griggs Road just before noon Monday.  

   Firefighters arrived to learn that 44 year old Jeffery Guebert had fallen into a grain elevator.  Rescue workers cut holes in the side of the silo in an attempt to retrieve Guebert, but it was too late.  His body was recovered by late afternoon.  

   Randolph County authorities are still trying to determine how Guebert fell into the elevator.

Published in Local News
EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. (AP) - A southwestern Illinois woman who was accused in 2011 of providing the heroin that killed her boyfriend and another man is on trial on charges that she injected a woman with a non-fatal overdose of the drug.
 
Jury selection began Tuesday for 29-year-old Angella Halliday's Madison County trial on an aggravated battery count linked to last summer's overdose of a Wood River woman who later was revived by paramedics.
 
Halliday was charged with two counts of drug-induced homicide in 2011 for allegedly providing the heroin that killed a Worden man and her boyfriend weeks apart.
 
Prosecutors dropped the homicide charges in 2012 after Halliday pleaded guilty to a drug count. She was sentenced to four years in prison but was released on parole in May of last year.
Published in Local News
ST. LOUIS (AP) - Influenza cases are rising sharply in Missouri, with nine deaths reported so far this season at one St. Louis hospital alone.
 
All nine deaths at Barnes-Jewish Hospital involved people in their mid-20s to mid-60s, hospital officials said Friday. That's unusual because flu deaths are more typical among the very young and the very old. Another 35 patients were sick enough to be treated in the Barnes-Jewish intensive care unit.
 
Officially, Missouri has reported more than 6,700 confirmed flu cases this season. Most cases in Missouri involve the H1N1, or swine flu, strain. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services lumps flu and pneumonia deaths together so the number of statewide flu deaths wasn't known.
Published in Local News

The investigation is underway after the death of a toddler in North St. Louis.

Around 7:30 AM Thursday, crews were called to the 5600 block of Kingsbury for a sick child. The 3-year-old was not breathing and was taken to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Authorities say the child abuse division is investigating-- that does not imply any foul play-- it is standard procedure.

Published in Local News
   OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The family of a 13-year-old California girl who was declared brain dead after suffering complications from sleep apnea surgery has gotten her the feeding and breathing tubes that they had been fighting for.
   Christopher Dolan, the attorney for the girl's family, said doctors inserted the gastric tube and tracheostomy tube Wednesday at the undisclosed facility where Jahi McMath was taken Jan. 5.
   The procedure was a success, Dolan said, and Jahi is getting the treatment that her family believes she should have gotten 28 days ago, when doctors at Children's Hospital Oakland first declared her brain dead.
   Jahi underwent tonsil surgery Dec. 9, then began bleeding heavily before going into cardiac arrest and being declared brain dead Dec. 12.
   Her mother has refused to believe Jahi is dead and went to court to prevent her daughter from being taken off a ventilator.
   Jahi's uncle, Omari Sealey, said Monday that she is now being cared for at a facility that shares her family's belief that she still is alive.
   The new facility has "been very welcoming with open arms," Sealey said. "They have beliefs just like ours."
   Neither Dolan nor the family would disclose the name or location of that facility, which took the eighth-grader after a weekslong battle by her family to prevent Children's Hospital Oakland from removing her from the breathing machine that has kept her heart beating.
   But medical experts said the ventilator won't work indefinitely and caring for a patient whom three doctors have said is legally dead is likely to be challenging because — unlike someone in a coma — there is no blood flow or electrical activity in either her cerebrum or the brain stem that controls breathing.
   The bodies of brain dead patients kept on ventilators gradually deteriorate, eventually causing blood pressure to plummet and the heart to stop, said Dr. Paul Vespa, director of neurocritical care at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has no role in McMath's care. The process usually takes only days but can sometimes continue for months, medical experts say.
   "The bodies are really in an artificial state. It requires a great deal of manipulation in order to keep the circulation going," Vespa said.
   Brain-dead people may look like they're sleeping, he added, but it's "an illusion based on advanced medical techniques."
   Sealey, the girl's uncle, said Monday that Jahi's mother, Nailah Winkfield, is relieved her persistence paid off and "sounds happier." He criticized Children's Hospital for repeatedly telling Winkfield they did not need her permission to remove Jahi from the ventilator because the girl was dead.
   Sealey told reporters Monday that Jahi traveled by ground from Children's Hospital to the unnamed facility and there were no complications in the transfer, suggesting she may still be in California.
   The $55,000 in private donations the family has raised since taking the case public helped cover the carefully choreographed handoff to the critical care team and transportation to the new location, Sealey said.
   "If her heart stops beating while she is on the respirator, we can accept that because it means she is done fighting," he said. "We couldn't accept them pulling the plug on her early."
   Meanwhile, an advocacy group is facing sharp criticism for using Jahi's case to try to raise money.
   The nonprofit Consumer noted in an email solicitation that it fights for patient safety for families like Jahi's and that it had drafted a proposed November ballot measure that would raise medical malpractice award limits in California.
   Dolan, the family attorney, is a board member of Consumer Attorneys of California, the prime group funding the ballot initiative to lift the cap on pain and suffering awards. But he said he was dismayed that Consumer Watchdog used Jahi's name as a fundraising tool.
   "Using Jahi's case as an example is wrong and that is not what this case is about," he said in a text message to the Associated Press.
   Hospital spokesman Sam Singer also criticized the use of Jahi's case for fundraising, calling it "tasteless and thoughtless."
   Consumer Watchdog Executive Director Carmen Balber said the funds were being solicited for the organization's patient safety program, not the political campaign, and none of the money would go to the ballot measure.
   "We thought we were being clear," she said. "This email has been construed in ways we didn't expect."
   Consumer Watchdog's Christmas Eve email to supporters prominently mentioned the Jahi McMath case to support the need for its advocacy work and for lifting the state's 38-year-old cap on medical malpractice awards.
   "Hospitals like Children's actually have an incentive to let children like Jahi die," the email said. "If kids injured by medical negligence die, the most their families can recover is $250,000. ... If children who are victims of medical negligence live, hospitals are on the hook for medical bills for life, which could be millions."
   If it gets on November's ballot and passes, the Troy & Alana Pack Patient Safety Act would raise the cap on medical malpractice awards to about $1.2 million, a limit that would increase based on inflation, said Bob Pack, chair of the campaign committee. He said the group has collected about 500,000 signatures and wants 300,000 more by March 25 to assure there are enough valid ones to qualify for the ballot.
Published in National News
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