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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

Former jail chief sues STL city for wrongful termination

Tuesday, 11 February 2014 06:37 Published in Local News

   Former St. Louis corrections commissioner Gene Stubblefield says his termination in 2012 was racially motivated.  On Monday, he filed an employment discrimination complaint in federal court under the Civil Rights Act of 1964, according to a report in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.  

   Mayor Francis Slay had removed Stubblefield from his post in 2011 after a series of jailbreaks and financial trouble in the corrections department.

   St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson had been the mayor's operations director at that time.  He investigated the management at the jail and reported several problems.  

   The city's Civil Service Commission upheld Stubblefield's firing the next year.  

   Stubblefield claims he was wrongly accused and says white city employees haven't been fired for similar misconduct.

 

   A new system for summoning jurors in the City of St. Louis is leaving some people out in the cold.  
   The St. Louis Circuit Court moved last year to a jury summoning system run by the Office of State Courts Administrator.  
   Jury Supervisor Joanne Martin tells the St. Louis Post-Dispatch the new system isn't able to handle the workload in St. Louis, which uses more jurors than any other circuit in the state.  Martin told the paper that the rate of juror response has dropped to about 25 percent, from 45 percent, since the switch.  So they began summoning more people.  
   Martin says that helped, but yesterday, when the court needed 450 jurors, 750 showed up.  The extra 300 people caused a log jam that forced jurors to line up outside the courthouse for 15 minutes or more in near-zero temperatures.  
   The court is working with OSCA to resolve the issues with the system.
 

Wash U: Surgery goggles to aid in cancer treatment

Tuesday, 11 February 2014 06:21 Published in Health & Fitness

   High tech glasses developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may help surgeons visualize cancer cells, which could help reduce the number of surgeries need to eradicate the disease in many patients.  

   The glasses are so new they have yet to be named.  

   They're designed to make it easier for surgeons to distinguish cancer cells from healthy cells, by making the cancer cells appear blue.  Highlighting the diseased cells will help to ensure that no stray tumor cells are left behind during surgery.  

   The glasses were used during surgery for the first time Monday. Breast surgeon Dr. Julie Margenthaler performed the operation at BJC's Siteman Cancer Center.  She says more development and testing will be done, but the potential benefits to patients is encouraging.

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