Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

 
 
 
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers gave final approval to legislation that could lower treatment cost for some cancer patients.
 
The bill would prohibit insurance companies from charging patients more than $75 for oral cancer drugs rather than traditional intravenous treatments. Sponsoring Rep. Sheila Solon, of Blue Springs, says oral drugs often carry fewer side effects for cancer patients.
 
The House voted 147-6 on Thursday to send the bill to Gov. Jay Nixon's desk. The Senate passed the measure last month.
 
Patients are often charged much more for oral chemotherapy because it is handled as a pharmacy benefit. Traditional intravenous treatments often cost only the standard co-payment for an office visit.
 
House Speaker Tim Jones says the bill would be among the most significant pieces of legislation passed by the Legislature this year.
Published in Local News
Saturday, 08 February 2014 13:34

Machine to aid cancer patients gets tryout

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Two lung cancer patients in St. Louis are the first anywhere to get radiation therapy in a new machine that provides real-time clear imaging of their tumors.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the ViewRay machine was developed by a Washington University doctoral graduate, Jim Dempsey. He brought his invention back to Washington University in 2011 for a clinical trial, though the university holds no patents or financial interests in it.

The machine was recently used on two patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. It allows the magnetic resonance imaging and radiation to be produced at the same time, giving doctors a look at the tumor as they deliver the radiation beams, potentially helping them better target the cancerous cells.

Published in Local News
One of every 10 clinical trials for adults with cancer ends prematurely because researchers can't get enough people to test new treatments, scientists report.
 
The surprisingly high rate reveals not just the scope and cost of wasted opportunities that deprive patients of potential advances, but also the extent of barriers such as money, logistics and even the mistaken fear that people won't get the best care if they join one of these experiments.
 
"Clinical trials are the cornerstone of progress in cancer care," the way that new treatments prove their worth, said Dr. Matthew Galsky of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.
 
When an experimental drug or other treatment fails to make it to the market, people often think it didn't work or had too many side effects, but the inability to complete studies can doom a drug, too, Galsky said.
 
He helped lead an analysis of 7,776 experiments registered on Clinicaltrials.gov, a government web site for tracking medical experiments, from September 2005 to November 2011. All were mid- or late-stage studies testing treatments for various types of cancer in adults.
 
About 20 percent of the studies were not completed for reasons that had nothing to do with the treatment's safety or effectiveness (legitimate reasons for ending a study early). Poor accrual — the inability to enroll enough patients in enough time to finish the study — led to nearly 40 percent of premature endings.
 
Company-sponsored studies were less likely to be completed than those sponsored by the government or others. Late-stage cancer trials can cost companies "tens to even hundreds of millions of dollars," and that money is wasted if no clear answer on the drug's value is gained, said Dr. Charles J. Ryan, a cancer specialist at the University of California, San Francisco.
 
He heads the program for a conference later this week in San Francisco where Galsky's study will be presented. It was discussed Tuesday in a telebriefing by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, an organization for doctors who treat cancer.
 
Ryan and Galsky said they hoped the study would spur more research on why more patients don't participate. In most cases, the treatment being tested is provided for free, but there can be other costs such as lab tests. Some states require insurers to cover these additional costs, but others do not, so money may be one hurdle for patients.
 
Some doctors do not strongly encourage patients to participate in studies, and sometimes patients fear they'll get a dummy treatment instead of real medicine. However, in cancer clinical trials, ethical standards require that all patients get the current best care, plus a chance at an experimental treatment.
 
"Patients still have concerns about getting a placebo, but they're always going to get at a minimum the standard of care," said Shelley Fuld Nasso, head of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, a patient advocacy and education organization.
 
Doctors need to encourage more patients to participate, and clinical trial designers need to make sure they are testing key questions and treatments to honor the contributions of study participants, she said.
 
___
 
Online:
 
Cancer patient info: http://www.cancer.net
 
Decision-making guide: http://bit.ly/L67zkT
 
Clinical trials: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov
 
Published in Health & Fitness
   ST. LOUIS (AP) - Two Turkish citizens face federal smuggling charges for allegedly shipping tainted cancer treatment prescription drugs from Turkey and other foreign countries into Missouri.
   Federal prosecutors say OzKan Semizoglu and Sabahaddin Akman smuggled three shipments from Turkey to Chesterfield.
   A grand jury indictment filed Thursday in federal court says the pair falsely identified the shipments as gifts and documents with little or no monetary value. They are also charged with sending drugs requiring constant cold temperatures in packages without insulation, which could taint the medicine. They were arrested Thursday in Puerto Rico.
   Each faces one felony count of conspiracy to smuggle merchandise into the United States and three counts of smuggling.  Online court records did not list an attorney for either defendant.
 
Published in Local News
   A local group says cold war era nuclear waste is still sickening current and former residents along Cold Water Creek in north St. Louis County.  
   The group is called "Coldwater Creek—Just the facts please."  They group says an informal survey shows a higher than normal cancer rate among those who lived near the creek, which runs from near Lambert Airport through Florissant to the Missouri River.  
   The survey found more than 1,200 total cancers among 3,300 people who had lived around the creek, including 202 thyroid cancers or conditions, 113 brain tumors and 39 appendix cancers.  
   The group wants federal health investigators to classify the area as contaminated. That designation could lead to government compensation for their health problems.
 
Published in Local News

DETROIT (AP) - The lawyer for a Detroit-area cancer specialist accused of intentionally misdiagnosing patients says his client cannot post a $9 million bond.

Christopher Andreoff made the comment Wednesday, a day after a federal judge ordered bond for Dr. Farid Fata be increased from $170,000.

Prosecutors asked for the higher bond for fear the 48-year-old Fata would flee the country. They say FBI tracing shows Fata and his wife have $9 million in liquid assets.

A federal grand jury indicted Fata on Wednesday on health care fraud. The government says Fata ripped off Medicare by giving chemotherapy to patients who didn't need it and diagnosing cancer when it wasn't apparent.

Andreoff says his client is innocent. Fata is being held in the Wayne County jail pending a Tuesday preliminary examination.

Published in National News

   CHICAGO (AP) - Actors, directors and film critics have gathered in Chicago to honor the late movie critic Roger Ebert.

   The movie reviewer's widow, Chaz Ebert, welcomed her husband's fans to the Chicago Theatre on Thursday, and remembered him as a father, friend, humanitarian and journalist.

   A choir began the memorial by singing "Roger Ebert, we will always love you."

   Actors John Cusack and Chris Tucker were to speak at the event, called "Roger Ebert: A Celebration of Life," along with Ebert's friends and family.

   The acclaimed critic died April 4 at age 70 after a years-long battle with cancer. The day before his death, Ebert wrote in a post on his blog that he was taking a break from his schedule of almost-daily movie reviewing because the cancer had recurred.

 
Published in National News

27-year-old Sandra Lupo alleges she was pushed out of her job after brain surgery left her with buzz cut hair and a healing scar that made it too painful to wear a wig.

Lupo had worked as a waitress at a St. Peters, Mo., Hooters since April 2005 but took a leave from her job for a few weeks last summer to have a cranial mass removed.

 Lupo had the support of her manager, who visited her in the hospital and suggested when she was ready to return to work that she wear a "chemo cap" or jewelry items "to distract from her lack of hair and the visibility of her cranial scar," court documents said.

On July 16, 2012, doctors gave Lupo clearance to go back to work at Hooters, where she worked to put herself through nursing school.

Shortly before she returned to work, Lupo and her immediate manager met with the Hooters regional manager who said Lupo would be required to wear a wig while at work, according to court documents.

Lupo told him "she did not have a wig and that she could not afford a wig, as they range in cost between several hundred and several thousands of dollars," according to the lawsuit, adding that the regional manager did not offer to pay for the wig.

After her manager approached her again regarding a wig, Lupo said she borrowed one and tried to wear it at work. But it "caused extreme stress to her body because of the surgery and the healing wound," according to court records.

Lupo said her manager then reduced her hours to the point where she was making so little income that she was forced to quit, which made her ineligible for unemployment benefits.

"[Lupo's] physical injury was an actual disability from her surgery which limited the major life activity of working when such work required a wig to be worn," court documents said.

In a complaint filed with the Missouri Commission on Human Rights, Lupo said she never believed her customers were ever "offended" by her appearance at the chain, which is known for its hot wings and servers clad in tight white tank tops and orange hot pants.

"My customers were not offended, and were in fact curious about the obvious scar from my surgery," she wrote in the complaint.

The lawsuit was moved from St. Charles County Circuit Court to U.S. District Court in St. Louis last week at the request of Georgia-based Hooters.

"Hooters of America believes the lawsuit is without foundation, denies the accusations and has filed a motion that the lawsuit be dismissed," a spokesman wrote in an email to ABCNews.com.

Lupo, whose attorney said Lupo now works as a trauma nurse, was not immediately available for comment.

The Americans With Disabilities Act prohibits employers from discriminating against qualified individuals who have a disability. This includes having a physical or mental impairment, a history of having an impairment or the perception of having one.

Marcia McCormick, an associate professor of law at St. Louis University, said Lupo's surgery to remove a brain mass qualifies as a disability, but that Hooters could argue that her appearance was a bona fide qualification for her job.

"In the disability context, if Hooters is to say she's not as attractive now without this wig, if they're selling her attractiveness that might be a real function of her job and mean she isn't qualified by the Americans With Disabilities Act," McCormick said.

"Most companies can't say s something like this, but Hooters sells this experience," she said.

 

 
Published in Local News
Thursday, 04 April 2013 14:47

Robert Ebert has died at 70

CHICAGO-- AP — The Chicago Sun-Times is reporting that its film critic Roger Ebert has died. He was 70.

 

The paper says on its website the Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic died Thursday.

 

Ebert was known for his thumbs-up, thumbs-down TV reviews that influenced moviegoers across the nation.

 

On Wednesday, he had announced on his blog that he was undergoing radiation treatment after a recurrence of cancer.

 

Ebert was diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 2002 and later had surgery for cancer of the salivary gland. He lost his chin and his ability to speak. But he later resumed writing full-time and eventually even returned to television.

 

Ebert started as a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times in 1967. In 1975 he became the first movie reviewer to get the Pulitzer Prize for criticism.

Published in National News
Radiation exposure from Coldwater Creek isn't responsible for increased cancer rates among north county residents. That's according to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services which released the results of a study yesterday.

State epidemiologists studied the incidence and death rates of 27 types of cancer in six ZIP codes along the creek, but found that rates of the two cancer types most commonly caused by radiation exposure - leukemias and thyroid tumors - were the same or lower than would have been expected.

Former north county residents say the study was incomplete, because it didn't count cancer victims who had moved away from the area before getting sick.

Coldwater Creek had been contaminated by nuclear waste after World War II.
Published in Local News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

Miley Cyrus Scottrade Concert Canceled

St. Louis, MO -- The show will NOT go on!  The Miley Cyrus concert scheduled for tonight at Scottrade Center has been canceled.   Cyrus was forced to cancel h...

Fluoride Will Stay In Missouri Water Unless Customers N…

 JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Public water systems could be required to notify Missouri customers before eliminating fluoride from drinking water.   The Missouri...

Missouri Unemployment Rate Rises

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri's unemployment rate increased in March, though the size of payrolls also grew.      The Department of Economic Develop...

Illinois Strip Club Tax Not As Profitable As Expected

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - Illinois officials say a strip club tax has generated less than 40 percent of the money that was expected when the surcharge was approved.   ...

Missouri Senate Supports Additional Donor Tax Credits

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri could award additional tax credits for donations to pregnancy resource centers, food pantries and maternity homes under legislation endorsed ...

Missouri Tax Cut Proposal Could Hurt Higher Education

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Officials from Missouri's public universities are raising concerns about reduced revenues for education as state lawmakers consider an income tax cut....

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved