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ST. LOUIS (AP) - The owners of the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis remain hopeful the Rams won't leave after city leaders rejected $700 million in upgrades sought by the team.

The Rams can break their lease after the 2014 season but have said little about their plans.

The lease requires the St. Louis Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority to provide the team with a "first-tier" stadium by 2015, which is 20 years after the building opened.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has taken over negotiations with Rams owner Stan Kroenke after arbitration between the team and the St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission failed. The commission operates the dome.

Board chairman Jim Shrewsbury said Tuesday that dome officials haven't given up on keeping the team.

Published in Local News

   Metro Transit officials and union leaders will resume contract negotiations early next month.  

   Bi-State Development Agency President & CEO John Nations officials with the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 788 have assured him there will be no work stoppages before both sides sit down and talk the week of September 9th.  The union represents MetroBus and MetroLink operators as well mechanics and some clerical staff.  

   Nations says a work stoppage would be unfair to the nearly one million passengers a week who ride MetroLink and Metro buses.

Published in Local News

   SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea on Thursday accepted South Korea's request that this week's talks on reuniting families separated by war be held at a border village, Seoul officials said, the latest in a series of conciliatory gestures Pyongyang has recently taken.

   North Korea appears to be increasingly open to reducing the tensions marked by a North Korean nuclear test, war threats and annual military drills by Seoul and Washington. The Koreas agreed last week to move toward reopening a jointly run factory park closed since April, and North Korea's criticism of U.S.-South Korean training exercises this week was milder in tone than its statements on past drills.

   North Korea agreed to hold talks on Friday on the southern side of the border village of Panmunjom as South Korea proposed, South Korean Unification Ministry spokesman Kim Hyung-suk told reporters Thursday, according to his office. Pyongyang had earlier proposed meeting at Diamond Mountain, a scenic site in North Korea.

   North Korea also proposed another set of talks between late August and early September on resuming lucrative jointly run tours to Diamond Mountain, according to the ministry. South Korea proposed holding talks on the mountain tours on Sept. 25 in response to North Korea's earlier proposal to meet on Thursday.

   "North Korea once again showed it would continue the mood of dialogue .... with South Korea," said Lim Eul Chul, a professor at South Korea's Kyungnam University. "North Korea is believed to have determined that reunions of separated families would be helpful for a resumption of Diamond Mountain tours."

   The mountain tours had provided a legitimate source of hard currency to North Korea before they were suspended after a 2008 shooting death of a South Korean tourist in the resort.

   The president of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Peter Maurer, is visiting the two Koreas to discuss the family reunion and other humanitarian issues. Maurer arrived in Pyongyang for a four-day trip and is to travel on to Seoul on Sunday after a visit to China.

   The ICRC has had a permanent presence in North Korea for about 10 years. Maurer is the group's first president to make a combined visit to both countries on the Korean peninsula in 21 years, it said in a statement.

   Family reunions were a key inter-Korean cooperation project during a period of thawed relations between 2000 and 2010, but they have not been held for three years. About 22,000 Koreans were able to meet in that time. The families were separated by the 1950-53 Korean War, when there were huge movements of refugees between North and South Korea.

   But analysts say the North often follows provocations and threats with a charm offensive meant to win aid. A similar proposal on the reunions in July fizzled.

Published in National News

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