Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
   CAIRO (AP) - A court in southern Egyptian has convicted 529 supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi, sentencing them to death on charges of murdering a policeman and attacking police.
   The court in Minya issued its ruling on Monday after only two sessions in which the defendants' lawyers complained they had no chance to present their case.
   Those convicted are part of a group of 545 defendants on trial for the killing of a police officer, attempted killing of two others, attacking a police station and other acts of violence.
   More than 150 suspects stood trial, the others were tried in absentia. Sixteen were acquitted.
   The defendants were arrested after violent demonstrations that were a backlash for the police crackdown in August on pro-Morsi sit-ins in Cairo that killed hundreds of people.
Read more...

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Southern California used to be known as the "Bank Robbery Capital of the World."

No more.

The Los Angeles Times reports the number of robberies has declined, part of a larger trend that has seen crime rates fall across the nation.

There were 212 bank robberies last year — the lowest since the 1960s — in a seven-county region overseen by the FBI's Los Angeles office.

During the worst year in 1992, more than two dozen Los Angeles banks were robbed in a single day.

Authorities say better security at banks such as bulletproof acrylic glass has made it harder for bandits to get access to money. They also credit the ability to make high-resolution images of robbers available to the public through the Internet.

Read more...

CHICAGO (AP) -- For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job.

At 62, Payne has worked for three decades as a nurse, most recently traveling house to house caring for 30 elderly and disabled patients. But she's ready to leave that behind, including the job-based health benefits, to move to Oregon and promote her self-published book. She envisions herself blogging, doing radio interviews and speaking to seniors groups.

"I want the freedom to fit that into my day without squeezing it into my day," she said.

One of the selling points of the new health care plan, which has a March 31 enrollment deadline, is that it breaks the link between affordable health insurance and having a job with benefits. Payne believes she'll be able to replace her current coverage with a $400- to $500-a-month plan on Oregon's version of the new insurance exchange system set up under the law.

Federal experts believe the new insurance option will be a powerful temptation for a lot of job-weary workers ready to bail out. Last month, congressional budget analysts estimated that within 10 years, the equivalent of 2.5 million full-time workers could be working less because of the expanded coverage.

But is the new option a gamble? That's a matter of debate, not only among the politicians who are still arguing furiously over the law's merits, but among economists and industry experts.

"We don't know what the future of exchange insurance will be," said economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum, a center-right public policy institute. Premiums should remain stable if enrollment picks up and broadens to include younger, healthier people. But if older, sicker people are the vast majority of customers, prices eventually could spike.

For Mike Morucci, 50, the idea of leaving his information technology job and its health benefits is "terrifying," he said.

But he decided to take the plunge after reviewing the range of coverage available at different price points. Tax credits will help those with moderate incomes pay their insurance premiums. And coverage is guaranteed even for those with pre-existing conditions. Twenty-five states also agreed to expand their Medicaid programs, providing health care for more low-income people.

"It definitely freed up my thinking when I thought, `Do I want to give this a go?'" Morucci, of Ellicott City, Md.

Morucci has been writing scripts at night and on weekends for four years and is on a team of writers for a web-based comedy series titled "Click!" launching this spring. Before giving notice at the job he had held for 18 years, he made a spreadsheet of health plans available on the Maryland exchange and found one for $650 a month to cover him and his 23-year-old daughter.

"I turned 50, so for me it's time to focus on my passion instead of my paycheck," he said.

The United States has been unique among industrialized nations in tying insurance and employment closely, said labor economist Craig Garthwaite of Northwestern University, who co-authored a frequently cited study on how the health law may break what's known as "job lock." Even in Germany and Japan, where insurance remains private, people who can't afford it get public assistance and coverage is guaranteed.

Job lock "forces people to work at jobs that are not suited to their talents just to get benefits," Garthwaite said. "Economists tend to think that's a bad thing."

In congressional testimony this month, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said that "people will have some choices that they don't have today" including farm families who "will have the choice of not having to have an off-farm job to get health insurance for the family."

However, one rub may be the cost. The insurance on the new marketplace is often more expensive than what a worker has now because employers often make large contributions to premiums.

The average annual premium paid by an employee is $999, according to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation survey. In the new markets, the average annual premium is $5,558 for a 50-year-old and $8,435 for a 60-year-old, according to an analysis run for The Associated Press by HealthPocket.

But some employers are cutting back on their contributions, narrowing the gap.

At this point, Americans over age 50 are most likely to take advantage of the new freedom, Garthwaite said. They're ready for a career change and may have enough savings to take a risk.

Pamela Mahoney, 50, of Los Gatos, Calif., decided to leave a job in corporate communications when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the health care law.

"I about did cartwheels down the hall," she said of hearing the court's decision. In January, she joined her husband full time in the communications company, BlueChair Group Inc., they co-founded. They recently chose an insurance plan for $1,100 a month on the California marketplace.

She was able to get coverage despite having asthma, a pre-existing condition that might have made her uninsurable before the new law guaranteed coverage.

"Prior to the Affordable Care Act, I felt bound to be an employee rather than a small business owner," she said. "There's something to be said for having your own business and being in control of your own destiny."

---

Associated Press Medical Writer Carla K. Johnson can be reached atHTTPS://TWITTER.COM/CARLAKJOHNSON

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

Read more...

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

Ferry stops service on Mississippi River

  MEYER, Ill. (AP) — A farm cooperative has shut down a ferry service that shuttled agricultural products and other goods across the Mississippi River between western I...

Pepsi franchise to open center in Cape Girardeau

Pepsi franchise to open center in Cape Girardeau

  CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. (AP) — A Pepsi franchise is planning to build a new customer service center in Cape Girardeau (juh-RAHR'-doh) that could create 74 jobs. The M...

Man charged in Kansas City-area highway shootings

  KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Authorities say a Kansas City-area man has been charged with 18 felony counts in connection with about a dozen recent random highway shootings...

Molina's error hurts Cardinals in 3-1 loss to Nats

  WASHINGTON (AP) -- There's a simple reason St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Michael Wacha felt comfortable putting a changeup in the ground with the bases loaded in the se...

St. Louis priest accused of having sex with minor

St. Louis priest accused of having sex with minor

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A St. Louis priest is accused of having sex with a minor at the Cathedral Basilica, where he served.   Reverend Joseph Jiang was arrested on ...

Missouri man in custody after clerical error frees him from prison

Missouri man in custody after clerical error frees him …

ST. LOUIS (AP) - A Missouri man who avoided prison because of a clerical error and led a law-abiding life for 13 years said he is overwhelmed by the support he's received since ...

Hazelwood voters could vote on new utility tax

Hazelwood voters could vote on new utility tax

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - Hazelwood residents could soon have the chance to vote on a proposed utility tax.   Currently, Hazelwood is the only St. Louis County municip...

Courts moving away from eyewitness testimony as gold standard

Courts moving away from eyewitness testimony as gold st…

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Courts and legislatures are slowly shifting away from using eyewitness testimony as the gold standard of evidence. The reason: Studies show it's only right...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved