Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — A soldier opened fire Wednesday on fellow service members at the Fort Hood military base, killing three people and wounding 16 before committing suicide at the same post where more than a dozen people were slain in a 2009 attack, authorities said.
 
The shooter apparently walked into a building and began firing a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol. He then got into a vehicle and continued firing before entering another building and kept shooting.
 
He was eventually confronted by military police in a parking lot. As he came within 20 feet of an officer, the gunman put his hands up but then reached under his jacket and pulled out his gun. The officer drew her own weapon, and the suspect put his gun to his head and pulled the trigger a final time, according to Lt. Gen. Mark A. Milley, senior officer on the base.
 
The gunman, who served in Iraq for four months in 2011, had sought help for depression, anxiety and other problems. Before the attack, he had been undergoing an assessment to determine whether he had post-traumatic stress disorder, Milley said.
 
The married suspect had arrived at Fort Hood in February from another base. He was taking medication, and there were reports that he had complained after returning from Iraq about suffering a traumatic brain injury, Milley said. The commander did not elaborate.
 
The gunman was never wounded in action, according to military records, Milley said.
 
There was no indication the attack was related to terrorism, Milley said.
 
The military declined to identify the gunman until his family members had been notified. Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said the suspect was named Ivan Lopez but offered no other details.
 
The gunman's weapon had been purchased recently in the local area and was not registered to be on the base, Milley said.
 
Late Wednesday, investigators had already started looking into whether his combat experience caused lingering psychological trauma. Among the possibilities they planned to explore was whether a fight or argument on base triggered the attack.
 
"We have to find all those witnesses, the witnesses to every one of those shootings, and find out what his actions were, and what was said to the victims," said a federal law enforcement official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the case by name.
 
The official said authorities would begin by speaking with Lopez's wife and expected to search his home and any computers he owned.
 
The injured were taken to the base hospital and other local hospitals. At least three of the nine patients at Scott and White Hospital in Temple were listed in critical condition.
 
Wednesday's attack immediately revived memories of the shocking 2009 assault on Fort Hood, which was the deadliest attack on a domestic military installation in U.S. history. Thirteen people were killed and more than 30 wounded.
 
Until an all-clear siren sounded hours after Wednesday's shooting began, relatives of soldiers waited anxiously for news about their loved ones.
 
"The last two hours have been the most nerve-wracking I've ever felt," said Tayra DeHart, 33, who had earlier heard from her husband that he was safe but was waiting to hear from him again.
 
Brooke Conover, whose husband was on base at the time of the shooting, said she found out about it while checking Facebook. She immediately called her husband, Staff Sgt. Sean Conover.
 
"I just want him to come home," Conover said.
 
President Barack Obama vowed that investigators would get to the bottom of the shooting.
 
In a hastily arranged statement in Chicago, Obama reflected on the sacrifices that troops stationed at Fort Hood have made — including enduring multiple tours to Iraq and Afghanistan.
 
"They serve with valor. They serve with distinction, and when they're at their home base, they need to feel safe," Obama said. "We don't yet know what happened tonight, but obviously that sense of safety has been broken once again."
 
The president spoke in the same room of a steakhouse where he had just met with about 25 donors at a previously scheduled fundraiser for the Democratic National Committee.
 
The November 2009 attack happened inside a crowded building where soldiers were waiting to get vaccines and routine paperwork after recently returning from deployments or preparing to go to Afghanistan and Iraq.
 
Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan was convicted and sentenced to death last year in that mass shooting. He said he acted to protect Islamic insurgents abroad from American aggression.
 
According to testimony during Hasan's trial last August, Hasan walked inside carrying two weapons and several loaded magazines, shouted "Allahu Akbar!" — Arabic for "God is great!" — and opened fire with a handgun.
 
The rampage ended when Hasan was shot in the back by Fort Hood police officers. He was paralyzed from the waist down and is now on death row at the military prison at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas.
 
After that shooting, the military tightened security at bases nationwide. Those measures included issuing security personnel long-barreled weapons, adding an insider-attack scenario to their training and strengthening ties to local law enforcement. The military also joined an FBI intelligence-sharing program aimed at identifying terror threats.
 
In September, a former Navy man opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard, leaving 13 people dead, including the gunman. After that shooting, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the Pentagon to review security at all U.S. defense installations worldwide and examine the granting of security clearances that allow access to them.
 
Asked Wednesday about security improvements in the wake of the shootings, Hagel said, "Obviously when we have these kinds of tragedies on our bases, something's not working."
Published in National News

NEW YORK (AP) — A man says his 86-year-old grandfather shot him in the head, killed his girlfriend and then took his own life out of frustration that the couple was living in a family home in New York City.

Michael Feliciano spoke to the Daily News from his hospital bed for a story published Sunday.

Police say Feliciano's grandfather, Heriberto Pagan, unleashed the gunfire on the couple and himself Friday.

The 47-year-old Feliciano and his 28-year-old girlfriend, Claritle Huerta, were living in a Staten Island home owned by Feliciano's ailing mother. Feliciano says his grandfather wanted them out because of Feliciano's past drug problems.

He says Huerta called him Friday to tell him his grandfather wanted to talk to him. He says he opened the door, "and that was it."

The couple's 4-month-old son was found unharmed inside the house.

Published in National News
COLUMBIA, Md. (AP) — The mall where a Maryland teenager gunned down two people before killing himself was set for a somber reopening Monday under increased security as police worked to figure out why the shooting took place and whether the gunman knew either victim.
 
Investigators found a journal belonging to Darion Marcus Aguilar, 19, but they would only say that it "expressed general happiness." The contents, however, were enough for an officer looking into the disappearance of Aguilar on the day of the shooting to worry about the teen's safety.
 
Police said Aguilar took a taxi to the Mall in Columbia in suburban Baltimore on Saturday morning and entered the building near Zumiez, a shop that sells skateboarding gear. He went downstairs to a food court directly below the store, then returned less than an hour later, dumped the backpack in a dressing room and started shooting.
 
Shoppers fled in a panic or barricaded themselves behind closed doors. When police arrived, they found three people dead — two store employees and Aguilar.
 
The shooting baffled investigators and acquaintances of Aguilar, a quiet, skinny teenager who graduated from high school less than a year ago and had no previous run-ins with law enforcement.
 
Aguilar, who had concealed the shotgun in a bag, fired six to nine times. One victim, Brianna Benlolo, a 21-year-old single mother, lived half a mile away from Aguilar in the same College Park neighborhood, but police said they were still trying to determine what, if any, relationship they had.
 
The other employee, Tyler Johnson, did not know Aguilar and did not socialize with Benlolo outside of work, a relative said.
 
Zumiez chief executive Rick Brooks said in a statement that when the mall reopens, there will be memory books to sign and visitors will be invited to float flowers in the mall's fountain in memory of Benlolo and Johnson.
 
"Counselors have met with the store team," he said Sunday. "The emotions are very raw and real — and as co-workers and friends, we are pulling together."
 
Aguilar was accepted last February to Montgomery College, a community college in the Washington suburbs, but school spokesman Marcus Rosano said he never registered or attended.
 
Tydryn Scott, 19, said she was Aguilar's lab partner in science class at James Hubert Blake High School and said he hung out with other skaters. She said she was stung by the news.
 
"It was really hurtful, like, wow — someone that I know, someone that I've been in the presence of more than short amounts of time. I've seen this guy in action before. Never upset, never sad, just quiet, just chill," Scott told The Associated Press. "If any other emotion, he was happy, laughing."
 
Aguilar graduated in 2013.
 
The Prince George's County Police Department said it received a missing persons report for Aguilar at about 1:40 p.m. Saturday, more than two hours after the mall shooting. Officers went to Aguilar's home to speak with his mother about 5 p.m. and saw Aguilar's journal. The portion the officer read made him concerned for Aguilar's safety, the department said.
 
Police began tracking Aguilar's phone and soon discovered it was at the mall.
 
Howard County Police Chief William McMahon said there has been speculation about a romantic relationship between the gunman and Benlolo, but investigators have not been able to establish that.
 
Aguilar purchased the 12-gauge shotgun legally last month at a store in neighboring Montgomery County.
 
At his home where he lived with his mother, officers also recovered more ammunition, computers and documents, police said. No one answered the door there Sunday. A half-mile away, a roommate who answered the door at Benlolo's home confirmed that she lived there but declined to comment further. Two police officers went into the home after he spoke briefly to a couple of reporters.
 
Residents described the neighborhood as a mix of owners and renters, including some University of Maryland students.
 
A man who answered the phone at Johnson's residence in Mount Airy, northwest of Baltimore, said the family had no comment. The victim's aunt told a local television station she did not believe her nephew knew Aguilar.
 
Sydney Petty, in a statement to WBAL-TV, said she did not believe her nephew had a relationship with Benlolo.
 
"Tyler didn't have anything beyond a working relationship with this girl, and he would have mentioned it if he did, and we're just as confused as anybody," Petty said.
 
Five other people were hurt in the attack, but only one was hit by gunfire — a woman who was hit in the foot upstairs near Zumeiz. All were released from hospitals hours later.
Published in National News

   A Jefferson City boy and the St. Louis man charged with kidnapping him are both dead after an apparent murder-suicide.  The bodies of six year old Markell Beasley and 40 year old Demetrius Beasley were found shot to death Tuesday night at a home in Cape Girardeau. Police are still investigating, but say it appears the man shot the child and then turned the gun on himself.

   Police say Demetrius Beasley wasn't the boy's biological father, but had had a relationship with the child's mother.  She told police she had allowed her son to travel to St. Louis from Jefferson City on Saturday for a Christmas gathering with Demetrius Beasley's family. But the mother said she later learned there was no gathering and that Beasley didn't intend to return her son.  

   Police had charged the St. Louis man with kidnapping Tuesday morning.

Published in Local News

   JACKSON, Miss. (AP) - State police in Mississippi say a murder suspect shot a Jackson police detective and then shot himself at police headquarters.

   Mississippi Bureau of Investigation spokesman Warren Strain said Friday that Jeremy Powell shot Detective Eric Smith before killing himself, in the first official description of how the men died.

  The state agency took over the investigation from the Jackson Police Department.

  The men died in a third-floor room Thursday where Smith was interrogating Powell. Powell had been arrested in connection with the stabbing death of a 20 year old Jackson man.

   Hinds County Coroner Sharon Grisham-Stewart says she will perform autopsies on Friday.

Published in National News
BRANSON, Mo. (AP) - Police are investigating two deaths at a hotel in the southwest Missouri resort town of Branson as a murder-suicide.

City spokesman Garrett Anderson says the deaths likely happened around 11 p.m. Saturday night at the Queen Anne I motel. The Springfield News-Leader reports that the names of the victims weren't immediately released, pending notification of relatives.

Anderson says he can't provide details. Branson police will have a press conference Monday.
Published in Local News

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next
St. Louis priest accused of having sex with minor

St. Louis priest accused of having sex with minor

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - A St. Louis priest is accused of having sex with a minor at the Cathedral Basilica, where he served.   Reverend Joseph Jiang was arrested on ...

Missouri man in custody after clerical error frees him from prison

Missouri man in custody after clerical error frees him …

ST. LOUIS (AP) - A Missouri man who avoided prison because of a clerical error and led a law-abiding life for 13 years said he is overwhelmed by the support he's received since ...

Hazelwood voters could vote on new utility tax

Hazelwood voters could vote on new utility tax

St. Louis, MO (KTRS) - Hazelwood residents could soon have the chance to vote on a proposed utility tax.   Currently, Hazelwood is the only St. Louis County municip...

Courts moving away from eyewitness testimony as gold standard

Courts moving away from eyewitness testimony as gold st…

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - Courts and legislatures are slowly shifting away from using eyewitness testimony as the gold standard of evidence. The reason: Studies show it's only right...

One Cent Sales Tax For Transportation Endorsed

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A Missouri Senate committee has endorsed a 1-cent sales tax increase to fund transportation projects.     The proposed constitutiona...

Safe Rooms Opening Soon In Joplin

(Joplin, MO)  --  Joplin officials say some safe rooms to protect residents during storms are expected to open in the next few weeks. Joplin school officials say f...

Dog Shooting Investigated In Washington, MO

WASHINGTON, Mo. (AP) - An investigation continues after an eastern Missouri deputy shot and killed a dog. The Washington Missourian reports that Franklin County deputies wen...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved