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Susan Smith-Harmon

Susan Smith-Harmon

   Snow plow crews in the City of St. Louis are changing their strategy for clearing the roads during this storm.
   One of the chief complaints with the last big winter storm was that plows clearing main thoroughfares had created snow mounds that blocked the streets leading into residential areas.  
   Not this time.  City Streets Director Todd Waelterman tells Fox 2 News that after the plows pass by, a second crew will hit the area.  "We'll go in with a two-man crew and we'll actually scoop those out and push that snow to the side to try to eliminate the extra snow we've created there," he said.
   As to whether the side streets themselves will be plowed, Waelterman says he's still reviewing his department's overall policies for handling residential streets.

FDA launching anti-smoking campaign aimed at youth

Tuesday, 04 February 2014 01:52 Published in Health & Fitness
   WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration is using ads that depict yellow teeth and wrinkled skin to show the nation's at-risk youth the costs associated with cigarette smoking.
   The federal agency said Tuesday it is launching a $115 million multimedia education campaign called "The Real Cost" that's aimed at stopping teenagers from smoking and encouraging them to quit.
   Advertisements will run in more than 200 markets throughout the U.S. for at least one year beginning Feb. 11. The campaign will include ads on TV stations such as MTV and print spots in magazines like Teen Vogue. It also will use social media.
   "Our kids are the replacement customers for the addicted adult smokers who die or quit each day," said Mitch Zeller, the director of the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products. "And that's why we think it's so important to reach out to them — not to lecture them, not to throw statistics at them — but to reach them in a way that will get them to rethink their relationship with tobacco use."
   Zeller, who oversaw the anti-tobacco "Truth" campaign while working at the nonprofit American Legacy Foundation time in the early 2000s, called the new campaign a "compelling, provocative and somewhat graphic way" of grabbing the attention of more than 10 million young people ages 12 to 17 that are open to, or are already experimenting with, cigarettes.
   According to the FDA, nearly 90 percent of adult smokers started using cigarettes by age 18 and more than 700 kids under 18 become daily smokers each day. The agency aims to reduce the number of youth cigarette smokers by at least 300,000 within three years.
   "While most teens understand the serious health risks associated with tobacco use, they often don't believe the long-term consequences will ever apply to them," said FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg. "We'll highlight some of the real costs and health consequences associated with tobacco use by focusing on some of the things that really matter to teens — their outward appearance and having control and independence over their lives."
   Two of the TV ads show teens walking into a corner store to buy cigarettes. When the cashier tells them it's going to cost them more than they have, the teens proceed to tear off a piece of their skin and use pliers to pull out a tooth in order to pay for their cigarettes. Other ads portray cigarettes as a man dressed in a dirty white shirt and khaki pants bullying teens and another shows teeth being destroyed by a ray gun shooting cigarettes.
   The FDA is evaluating the impact of the campaign by following 8,000 people between the ages of 11 and 16 for two years to assess changes in tobacco-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors.
   The campaign announced Tuesday is the first in a series of campaigns to educate the public about the dangers of tobacco use.
   In 2011, the FDA said it planned to spend about $600 million over five years on the campaigns aimed at reducing death and disease caused by tobacco, which is responsible for about 480,000 deaths a year in the U.S.
   Tobacco companies are footing the bill for the campaigns through fees charged by the FDA under a 2009 law that gave the agency authority over the tobacco industry.
   Future campaigns will target young adults ages 18-24 and people who influence teens, including parents, family members and peers. Other audiences of special interest include minorities, gays, people with disabilities, the military, pregnant women, people living in rural areas, and low-income people.

MU Campus closed Tuesday in anticipation of snowstorm

Tuesday, 04 February 2014 01:02 Published in Local News

   The winter storm that's expected to blow through Missouri is already causing some schools to cancel classes for Tuesday.  That includes the University of Missouri main campus in Columbia.  

   Monday evening, University officials announced the "full closure of the MU campus."  Only university employees who are "situationally critical" should report for work.  

   Forecasters are predicting up to 8-inches of snowfall in the Columbia, Missouri area.  Gary Ward, interim vice chancellor for administrative services says university officials were concerned because students, faculty and staff would be traveling to and from campus during the heaviest snowfall.  

   Ward says university administrators will decide by 8:00 p.m. Tuesday whether its safe enough to reopen on Wedensday.

 

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