Click for St. Louis, Missouri Forecast

// a href = ./ // St Louis News, Weather, Sports, The Big 550 AM, St Louis Traffic, Breaking News in St Louis

Online pharmacy:fesmag.com/tem

Have you a sex problem? Please visit our site:fesmag.com/medic

Site map
 
 
 
   SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) - Two men arrested along with Missouri wide receiver Dorial Green-Beckham have told police the pound of marijuana found in their car did not belong to the star football player.
   Criminal charges have not been filed after the Springfield native and two friends were arrested in January on suspicion of felony drug distribution. Police say they found the pot and other drug paraphernalia in the trunk of a Jeep Cherokee driven by John McDaniel.
   The Springfield News-Leader reports a probable cause statement shows that Patrick Prouty said he owned the pot but said it was for personal use. McDaniel said he had hidden one gram of marijuana in the car's glove box.
   Green-Beckham was charged in October 2012 with marijuana possession in Columbia and later pleaded guilty to second-degree trespassing.
 
Friday, 31 January 2014 03:38
Published in Sports
Written by
Read more...
SEATTLE (AP) — Amanda Knox is facing what seemed like a distant worry when she was giving national television interviews and promoting her autobiography last year: the possibility of being returned to Italy to serve decades in prison for the death of her roommate, Meredith Kercher.
 
Any decision on whether to extradite the 26-year-old from the U.S. is likely months away, at least. Experts have said it's unlikely that Italy's justice ministry would request Knox's extradition before the verdict is finalized by the country's high court.
 
If the conviction is upheld, a lengthy extradition process would likely ensue, with the U.S. State Department ultimately deciding whether to turn Knox back over to Italian authorities to finish serving her sentence.
 
Here's how that might play out.
 
___
 
EXTRADITION
 
Extradition is the process of one country surrendering to another country a person who has been accused or convicted of a crime. Under the terms of the extradition treaty between the U.S. and Italy, the offense must be a crime in each country and punishable by more than one year in prison.
 
Any request to extradite Knox would go to the U.S. State Department, which would evaluate whether Italy has a sufficient case for seeking Knox's return. If so, the State Department would transfer the case to the Justice Department, which would represent the interests of the Italian government in seeking her arrest and transfer in U.S. District Court.
 
American courts have limited ability to review extradition requests from other countries, but rather ensure the extradition request meets basic legal requirements, said Mary Fan, a former U.S. federal prosecutor who teaches law at the University of Washington in Seattle.
 
"The U.S. courts don't sit in judgment of another nation's legal system," Fan said.
 
___
 
THE POLITICAL AND THE LEGAL
 
Fan suggested that any decision by the State Department on whether to return Knox to Italy is "a matter of both law and politics." From an American standpoint, the case at first seems to raise questions about double jeopardy — being tried twice for the same offense, as barred by the U.S. Constitution. Knox was first convicted, then acquitted, then, on Thursday, the initial conviction was reinstated.
 
Some observers have dismissed the double-jeopardy issue because Knox's acquittal was not finalized by Italy's highest court.
 
That said, creative defense lawyers might make an effort to fight extradition over concerns about the legal process or the validity of the conviction, Fan said, and those arguments could carry political weight too. "Many Americans are quite astonished by the ups and downs in this case, and it's the U.S. that will ultimately be making the call about whether to extradite," Fan said.
 
Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., said in a statement Thursday she was "very concerned and disappointed by this verdict."
 
"I will continue to closely monitor this case as it moves forward through the Italian legal system," Cantwell said.
 
Christopher Jenks, a former Army attorney who served as a State Department legal adviser and now teaches at Southern Methodist University's law school, said Italy has a low bar to clear in compiling a legally sufficient extradition request.
 
"There would be a political or policy decision to be made by the State Department, but it's got to be founded in law or in reason," he said.
 
Jenks noted that the extradition treaty works both ways.
 
"If the U.S. ever wants to have any chance of extraditing an Italian murder suspect who has allegedly killed people in the U.S.," he said, "you have to give to get."
 
___
 
HAS ITALY HAD ENOUGH?
 
There have been other high-profile tussles over whether Americans suspected of crimes in Italy would face justice there.
 
In 1998, a low- and fast-flying U.S. Marine jet sliced a cable supporting a gondola at a ski resort in the Italian Alps, killing 20 people. Many Italians wanted the pilot and crew tried in Italy, though NATO rules gave jurisdiction to the U.S. military. The pilot faced a court martial in the U.S. and was acquitted of negligent homicide charges.
 
Italian courts convicted — in absentia — 26 CIA and U.S. government employees in the 2003 kidnapping of an Egyptian cleric suspected of recruiting terrorists in Milan. One, a U.S. Air Force colonel, was pardoned last year on the grounds that it was unprecedented to try an officer of a NATO country for acts committed in Italy. Another, the former CIA base chief in Milan, Robert Seldon Lady, has also requested a pardon. Lady was briefly held last summer in Panama based on an international arrest warrant issued by Italy, which has not yet formally requested his extradition.
 
"I suspect that the Italians feel there have been enough incidents of them not being able to prosecute Americans for crimes committed in Italy," Jenks wrote in an email.
Read more...
   ATLANTA (AP) — Hundreds of drivers have been reunited with abandoned cars and Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal ordered state employees back to work as the Atlanta area rebounds from a winter storm that coated the area with snow and ice.
   Many school districts throughout the metro area announced that they'd remain closed Friday, and Deal extended a state of emergency to Sunday night.
   He said in a statement that the declaration was extended to allow the state to continue using certain resources to help local governments clear roads and deal with other storm-related issues. Deal and emergency response officials have taken responsibility for poor planning leading up to the storm.
   Temperatures in the region are expected to reach the low 50s Friday, which should help responders clear ice accumulations from roads.
Read more...

   St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is shuffling the desks, and job titles of some of his city hall staff.   He's bringing in some new faces to replace some who are retiring.  

   The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that long-time alderman Fred Wessels is giving up his seat on the Board of Aldermen to take over the community development administration.  He'll replace Jill Claybour, who retired.  

   Former police board commissioner Richard Gray will be the new director of public safety, and current director, Charlene Deeken will be Gray's deputy.  

   Several other staffers will switch jobs.  

   All of the changes take affect on Monday.

Friday, 31 January 2014 01:29
Published in Local News
Written by
Read more...

Latest News

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
Prev Next

Ameren Missouri Rates Questioned

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri utility regulators plan to hear evidence in June on a pair of cases challenging the electricity rates charged by Ameren Missouri.   ...

Lobbyists Woo Missouri Lawmakers

ST. LOUIS (AP) - Industry and special interest groups have spent more than $200,000 in the last three years on trips for Missouri lawmakers.   Records reviewed by T...

Missouri Criminal Code Subject To Overhaul

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri lawmakers are poised to send Gov. Jay Nixon legislation to overhaul the state's criminal laws. House Majority Leader John Diehl says the ...

Missouri House Will Debate Student Transfer Program

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri House members plan to advance legislation that seeks to address a student transfer law requiring unaccredited school systems to pay for stude...

Kraft Recalls Oscar Mayer Wieners

Kraft Foods is recalling approximately 96,000 pounds of Oscar Mayer Classic Wieners because the products may contain Classic Cheese Dogs in the Classic Wieners’ packages. Th...

Cards defense, bullpen falter in 3-2 loss to Nats

Cards defense, bullpen falter in 3-2 loss to Nats

  WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Cardinals managed to score twice against Stephen Strasburg while starter Shelby Miller kept the Nationals offense quiet. Nine outs away from ta...

Probe could complicate Rick Perry's prospect

Probe could complicate Rick Perry's prospect

  AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Rick Perry has spent a record 14 years in office vanquishing nearly all who dared confront him. But with eight months left on the ...

Star sea lion at the St. Louis Zoo has died

Star sea lion at the St. Louis Zoo has died

  ST. LOUIS (AP) — A star sea lion at the St. Louis Zoo has died. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Bennie the sea lion died Friday. He was 11. Zoo spoke...

© 2013 KTRS All Rights Reserved