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   The fate of Ellisville's embattled mayor won't be known until next week. The City Council was supposed to vote on Mayor Adam Paul's impeachment Wednesday, but postponed deliberations until Monday.  

   Paul and his attorney Chet Pleban spoke with KTRS's McGraw Millhaven Thursday morning about the proceedings.  

   Some of the charges against Mayor Paul were dropped last night - due to a lack of evidence.  Those include allegations Paul leaked confidential information.  Paul says those charges should never have been brought against him.  

   "Releasing confidential information is pretty, pretty significant, and they're pretty serious allegations," Paul told McGraw.  "And if you're going to put allegations like that out there, you better have some evidence."

   Paul's attorney Chet Pleban told KTRS's McGraw Millhaven this morning that the charges against his client keep shifting.  Pleban says although some charges against his client have been dropped, another charge - that Paul improperly questioned a city official - took center stage at last night's council meeting.  

   Pleban says the charge stems from an inquiry the mayor made on behalf of a constituent.  Pleban told McGraw that the resident wanted to know how he would be compensated for being displaced from low-income housing by the new Walmart development.

   "He went to the person who was the relocation expert and asked that question of what does this person get," Pleban said. "He got the answer to that question. He was satisfied with the answer, took it back to his constituent.  And now they want to impeach him for asking the relocation person that particular question." 

   Paul says that when the council finally votes on it, he expects to be ousted, and if that happens, he says he will sue.

   Pleban says the city council is already hiring legal representation in anticipation of that lawsuit.

Thursday, 04 April 2013 10:13
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ST. LOUIS (AP) - Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander is preparing to announce what he calls a "major securities action" that involves millions of dollars.

   Kander scheduled a news conference Thursday at the Old Post Office in St. Louis. His office says Kander will seek restitution, civil penalties and fees and costs, but no other details have been released.

   The secretary of state's office is Missouri's chief overseer and enforcer of securities laws intended to protect investors from unfair practices and fraudulent schemes.

 
Thursday, 04 April 2013 09:56
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PHOENIX (AP) -- Time and again, the St. Louis Cardinals were on the verge of putting the Arizona Diamondbacks away once and for all.

Yet, for inning after inning after inning, they couldn't quite get it done.

Finally, Cliff Pennington's single in the 16th inning brought home Jason Kubel from second to give the Diamondbacks a 10-9 victory in a game that didn't end until early Thursday.

At 5 hours and 32 minutes, it was the longest home game in Diamondbacks history as far as time elapsed and tied for the longest at home in terms of innings.

"We got up on them a couple of times and they came back. That was just a really fun game to be a part of," the Cardinals' Allen Craig said. "It was really long. I wish it was a little bit shorter and we would have won, but it was fun to be a part of."

Yadier Molina drove in three runs, including a leadoff home run that put St. Louis up 8-7 in the seventh, but Aaron Hill's RBI single tied it at 8-8 before both teams scored a run in the 12th.

"We put up nine runs and got a lot of hits," the Cardinals' Allen Craig said. "We had some spots where we could have got some more. We just couldn't get it done."

Pennington was 0 for 11 to start the season before getting three hits in the extra innings.

The Diamondbacks, who won two of three against the Cardinals, came from behind four times to either take the lead or tie the game.

"Excuse me if I am smiling," Arizona manager Kirk Gibson said. "The things we practiced on, just being tough mentally, they hung in there. I don't know how many lead changes there were. It was over five hours long, 16 innings. It is just a great contribution. The guys were all there. We didn't panic when we got behind. Just outstanding. Just a great win."

Paul Goldschmidt and Martin Prado each hit a two-run homer, and Gerardo Parra homered, tripled and singled for the Diamondbacks.

Josh Collmenter (1-0) allowed one run on four hits in five innings to get the victory. He had pitched 1 2-3 innings in the team's 6-1 loss on Tuesday night.

"I felt good," Collmenter said. "It was part adrenaline, part wanting to keep in the game for the team. I think we were down to one guy and I wanted to go as long as I could. Health-wise I felt good. My arm felt good. In that situation, you don't want to let the guys down."

Fernando Salas (0-1), the last pitcher available in the St. Louis bullpen, took the loss.

In the 16th, Kubel drew a leadoff walk. Ian Kennedy, Arizona's opening day starter, pinch hit for Collmenter and put down a sacrifice bunt to move Kubel to second. That brought up Pennington, whose single to center finally ended it.

"We had some chances to finish it off. They did, too," St. Louis manager Mike Matheny said. "It was just one of those back and forth to see who's standing at the end."

Daniel Descalo tied his career high with four hits for St. Louis, including two doubles.

Paul Kozma's RBI single off Collmenter put St. Louis up 9-8 in the 12th, but in the bottom half, Mitchell Boggs allowed a leadoff single to Pennington and hit Eric Chavez in the ribs. Parra's sacrifice bunt advanced the runners then Prado's sacrifice fly tied it 9-9.

Boggs, taking over as closer in place of injured Jason Motte, said that Pennington jumped on a pitch, then his throw to Boggs got away from him too far inside.

"It was a one-run game and I put myself in the worst possible situation I could," Boggs said. "It's disappointing because our guys played outstanding tonight and fought like crazy to get a run right there, and it's tough to let it get away."

Arizona's Brandon McCarthy allowed six runs on nine hits in five-plus innings in his first outing since sustaining a horrific head injury last Sept. 5.

McCarthy, while pitching for Oakland, took a line drive to the side of his head off the bat of Erick Aybar of the Los Angeles Angels, sustaining what the Athletics described at the time as life-threatening injuries. McCarthy was hospitalized and underwent surgery after sustaining an epidural hemorrhage, brain contusion and skull fracture.

He signed with Arizona as a free agent in the offseason.

Molina singled in a pair in the Cardinals' four-run third.

Lance Lynn, an 18-game winner last season, had a 4-1 lead after four but never got an out in the fifth.

Parra narrowly missed a second home run with a triple off the wall in left-center, then scored on Lynn's wild pitch. Prado singled, then Hill bounced one over the fence into the pool area in right-center for a ground rule double to put runners at second and third.

Randy Choate relieved Lynn and gave up an RBI sacrifice fly to Miguel Montero. Choate left in favor of right-hander Joe Kelly, whose first pitch was lined by Goldschmidt off the top of the wall in left for a two-run homer that put Arizona up 5-4.

But McCarthy didn't get an out in the sixth. Matt Adams singled and Kozma doubled to put runners at first and second. Left-hander Tony Sipp replaced McCarthy and surrendered a two-run single to Descalso and St. Louis regained the lead 6-5.

Notes: Arizona's previous longest home game was 5 hours, 14 minutes. ... Parra opened the game for Arizona with his first career leadoff home run. ... Arizona OF Cody Ross, on the 15-day DL (left calf strain), begins a rehab assignment at Class A Visalia on Thursday. ... The Cardinals open a three-game series at San Francisco on Friday, sending RHP Jake Westbrook to the mound against the Giants LHP Barry Zito. ... LHP Wade Miley goes for the Diamondbacks at Milwaukee on Friday, with RHP Kyle Lohse starting for the Brewers.

© 2013 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.
Thursday, 04 April 2013 09:48
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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea has moved a missile with "considerable range" to its east coast, South Korea's defense minister said Thursday, but he added that there are no signs that the North is preparing for a full-scale conflict.

The report came hours after North Korea's military warned that it has been authorized to attack the U.S. using "smaller, lighter and diversified" nuclear weapons. It was the North's latest war cry against America in recent weeks. The reference to smaller weapons could be a claim that North Korea has improved its nuclear technology, or a bluff.

The North is not believed to have mastered the technology needed to miniaturize nuclear bombs enough to mount them on long-range missiles.

South Korean Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin said he did not know the reasons behind the North's missile movement, and that it "could be for testing or drills."

He dismissed reports in Japanese media that the missile could be a KN-08, which is believed to be a long-range missile that if operable could hit the United States.

Kim told lawmakers at a parliamentary committee meeting that the missile has "considerable range" but not enough to hit the U.S. mainland.

The range he described could refer to a mobile North Korean missile known as the Musudan, believed to have a range of 3,000 kilometers (1,800 miles). That would make Japan and South Korea potential targets — along with U.S. bases in both countries — but there are doubts about the missile's accuracy.

The Pentagon announced that it will hasten the deployment of a missile defense system to the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam to strengthen regional protection against a possible attack.

Experts say North Korea has not demonstrated that it has accurate long-range missiles. Some suspect that an apparent long-range missile unveiled by the North at a parade last year was actually a mockup.

"From what we know of its existing inventory, North Korea has short- and medium-range missiles that could complicate a situation on the Korean Peninsula (and perhaps reach Japan), but we have not seen any evidence that it has long-range missiles that could strike the continental U.S., Guam or Hawaii," James Hardy, Asia Pacific editor of IHS Jane's Defence Weekly, wrote in a recent analysis.

Kim, the South Korean defense minister, said that if North Korea were preparing for a full-scale conflict, there would be signs such as the mobilization of a number of units, including supply and rear troops, but South Korean military officials have found no such preparations.

"(North Korea's recent threats) are rhetorical threats. I believe the odds of a full-scale provocation are small," he said. But he added that North Korea might mount a small-scale provocation such as its 2010 shelling of a South Korean island, an attack that killed four people.

North Korea has been railing against joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises that are taking place in South Korea and has expressed anger over tightened U.N. sanctions for its February nuclear test. Many of the threats come in the middle of the night in Asia — daytime for the U.S. audience.

Analysts say the threats are probably efforts to provoke softer policies from South Korea, to win diplomatic talks with Washington and to solidify the image of young North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

At times, North Korea has gone beyond rhetoric.

On Tuesday, it announced it would restart a plutonium reactor it had shut down in 2007. A U.S. research institute said Wednesday that satellite imagery shows that construction needed for the restart has already begun.

For a second day Thursday, North Korean border authorities denied entry to South Koreans who manage jointly run factories in the North Korean city of Kaesong. South Koreans already at the plant were being allowed to return home.

South Korea has prepared a military contingency plan should North Korea hold South Korean workers hostage in Kaesong, Defense Minister Kim said. He wouldn't elaborate.

Outraged over comments in the South about possible hostage-taking and a military response from Seoul, a North Korean government-run committee threatened to pull North Korean workers out of Kaesong as well.

North Korea's military statement Thursday, from an unnamed spokesman from the General Bureau of the Korean People's Army, said its troops had been authorized to counter U.S. "aggression" with "powerful practical military counteractions," including nuclear weapons.

It said America's "hostile policy" and "nuclear threat" against North Korea "will be smashed by the strong will of all the united service personnel and people and cutting-edge smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear strike means."

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Washington is doing all it can to defuse the situation.

"Some of the actions they've taken over the last few weeks present a real and clear danger and threat" to the U.S. and its allies, Hagel said Wednesday.

South Korea's Defense Ministry said its military is ready to deal with any provocation by North Korea. "I can say we have no problem in crisis management," deputy ministry spokesman Wee Yong-sub told reporters.

The defense minister, however, was criticized by lawmakers over a North Korean defector who stole a South Korean fishing boat Wednesday night and fled back to North Korea across the western sea border.

Kim said South Korean radar had a "blind spot" in the area and South Korean troops were unaware the defector was fleeing until he almost reached the North Korean side. Lawmakers questioned his military's readiness to detect and counter enemy troops who might use similar blind spots.

This spring's annual U.S.-South Korea drills have incorporated fighter jets and nuclear-capable stealth bombers. The allies insist they are routine exercises. North Korea calls them rehearsals for a northward invasion and says it needs nuclear weapons to defend itself.

On Sunday, Kim Jong Un led a high-level meeting of party officials who declared building the economy and "nuclear armed forces" as the nation's priorities.

North Korea is believed to be working toward building an atomic bomb small enough to mount on a long-range missile. Long-range rocket launches designed to send satellites into space in 2009 and 2012 were widely considered covert tests of missile technology, and North Korea has conducted three underground nuclear tests.

"I don't believe North Korea has the capacity to attack the United States with nuclear weapons mounted on missiles, and won't for many years. Its ability to target and strike South Korea is also very limited," nuclear scientist Siegfried Hecker, a senior fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, said this week.

In comments posted on CISAC's website, Hecker said North Korea knows a nuclear attack would be met with "a devastating nuclear response."

Hecker has estimated that North Korea has enough plutonium to make several crude nuclear bombs. Its announcement Tuesday that it would restart a plutonium reactor indicated that it intends to produce more nuclear weapons material.

The U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies has analyzed recent commercial satellite imagery of the Nyongbyon nuclear facility, where the reactor was shut down in 2007 under the terms of a disarmament agreement. A cooling tower for the reactor was destroyed in 2008.

The analysis published Wednesday on the institute's website, 38 North, says that rebuilding the tower would take six months, but a March 27 photo shows building work may have started for an alternative cooling system that could take just weeks. Experts estimate it could take three months to a year to restart the plant.

___ Associated Press writers Matthew Pennington in Washington and Youkyung Lee in Seoul contributed to this report. ___ Follow Sam Kim on Twitter at twitter.com/samkim_ap
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