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   ST. LOUIS (AP) - The new priest at St. Raymond's Maronite Cathedral in St. Louis is a married man.
   Wissam Akiki was ordained Thursday night in the church that sits near downtown St. Louis. Several hundred people - including Akiki's wife and 8 year old daughter - were on hand for the ceremony.
   Eastern Catholic churches in the Middle East and Europe ordain married men. However, the Vatican banned the practice in America in the 1920s.
   Pope John Paul II called for greater acceptance of Eastern Catholic traditions. Over the years, popes have made exceptions on a case-by-case basis for married men to become Eastern Catholic priests in America.
   Pope Francis gave permission for Akiki to be ordained. It's considered an exception, not a policy change.
Friday, 28 February 2014 04:36
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   Sixth-grader Chloe Stirling will soon be back in the cupcake business.

   Officials in Madison County, Illinois, had ordered the 11 year old to stop baking cupcakes for sale, because the kitchen in her home didn't meet health department standards.

   The Triad Middle schooler and her parents told their story on the "Rachael Ray Show" that aired Thursday.  And a local plumbing company is upgrading the family kitchen thanks to donations of money and equipment.

   Chloe says she wants to use the money from her "Hey Cupcake!" business to someday buy a car.

Friday, 28 February 2014 02:53
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   Even as the U.S. Postal Service considers stopping Saturday mail delivery, they're staffing up to begin package deliveries on Sundays.  The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Amazon.com is working with local postal officials to roll out Sunday delivery in the St. Louis region by mid-March.  
   The online retailer began Sunday deliveries in New York and Los Angeles in November and had said it would add markets this year, but St. Louis hadn't been mentioned until now.  
   The paper reports that the USPS will be hiring some new workers to meet demands for Sunday deliveries.  
   Amazon hasn't made an official announcement yet, but leaders of the local postal unions tell the paper they had been told that the target date for Sunday delivery in this region is March 16.
 
 
Friday, 28 February 2014 02:40
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   CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — For 15 years the trucks have barreled past southeastern New Mexico's potash mines and seemingly endless fields of oil rigs, hauling decades worth of plutonium-contaminated waste to what is supposed to be a safe and final resting place a half mile underground in the salt beds of the Permian Basin.
   But back-to-back accidents and a never-supposed-to-happen above-ground radiation release have shuttered the federal government's only deep underground nuclear waste dump indefinitely, raising questions about a cornerstone of the Department of Energy's $5-billion-a-year program for cleaning up legacy waste scattered across the country from decades of nuclear bomb making.
   It also highlights a lack of alternatives for disposing of tainted materials like tools, gloves, glasses and protective suits from national labs in Idaho, Illinois, South Carolina and New Mexico.
   With operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on hold, so are all shipments, including the last of nearly 4,000 barrels of toxic waste that Los Alamos National Laboratories has been ordered to remove from its campus by the end of June. The presence of that waste, some of which was dug up from decades-old, unsealed dumps in the northern New Mexico mountains and is now stored outside with little protection, came to the public's attention three years ago as a massive wildfire lapped at the edges of the sprawling lab property.
   Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., says getting the rest of the waste off the mesa before wildfire season begins is "paramount," but that it is too soon to know if a temporary alternative site for storing the waste needs to be found.
   Also on hold are tests to see if the dump can expand its mission to take more than so-called lower level transuranic waste from the nation's research facilities, including hopes by DOE that it can ship hotter, liquid waste from leaking tanks at Washington state's Hanford nuclear waste site.
   New Mexico Environment Secretary Ryan Flynn said the state will be looking closely at what caused the leak that exposed at least 13 workers and sent radiation into the air around the plant before deciding whether to back plans to allow the repository to bring in waste from new sources.
   "Events like this should never occur," he said at a news conference last week where officials confirmed the leak. "From the state's perspective, one event is far too many."
   Government officials, politicians, the contractors that run the mine and local officials all say it is too soon to speculate on what the short- or long-term impacts of the of the shutdown might be, or where else the toxic waste would go. And they emphasize that all the safety systems designed to react to worst-case scenarios like a ceiling collapse or forklift puncturing one of the huge waste canisters worked.
   "A lot of people are just jumping up and down and wanting us to shut down," said Farok Sharif, president of the Nuclear Waste Partnership that runs WIPP. "But that's not the case here. We've designed this facility to look at these types of accidents and we've planned on making sure that we continue to protect our employees and we protect the environment. And our system worked as designed."
   Still, no one yet knows what caused the first-known radiation release from the massive rooms that have been dug out of the 2,000-foot thick ancient Permian Sea bed. Eventually, they will be covered in concrete, with the intent of safely sealing the casks of mostly solid waste 2,150 feet underground and preventing any future release into the environment.
   But watchdog Don Hancock of the Southwest Research and Information Center says WIPP has now failed in its long-stated mission "to start clean, stay clean."
   On Feb. 5, the mine was shut and six workers sent to the hospital for treatment of smoke inhalation after a truck hauling salt caught fire. Nine days later, a radiation alert activated in the area where newly arrived waste was being stored. Preliminary tests show 13 workers suffered some radiation exposure, and monitors as far as half a mile away have since detected elevated levels of plutonium and americium in the air. Ground and water samples are being analyzed.
   Officials said they're confident the incidents are unrelated. And while they emphasize that the levels detected off-site are no more harmful than a dental X-ray, they have not been able to go underground, and have not directly answered questions about how contaminated the tunnels might be.
   "There's a whole lot of stuff that we don't know," said Hancock. "A lot more sampling that needs to be done. Then there is going to have to be public discussion what needs to be done."
   WIPP is the nation's only deep underground geological repository for anything contaminated by more than the lowest levels of radiation. And opponents will certainly use the case to fight against any expansion of WIPP's mission, which is to take only transuranic waste from federal nuclear sites.
   "I'd say the push for expansion is part of the declining safety culture that has resulted in the fire and the radiation release," Hancock said.
   "I've been talking to (DOE Carlsbad filed office manager) Joe Franco and other people for a while about my concern that we all can get a little complacent when we think we know what we're doing and everything is just fine. ... Distracted nuclear waste disposal is a bad thing because bad things are going to happen."
   Sharif said Hancock's assertions that safety was lax are "absolutely not true.'"
   He said he believes the accidents "will demonstrate how robust the facility is," and that the lessons learned will make it safer.
   Carlsbad Mayor Dale Janway concedes, however, the accident could have long-term effects.
   "I am worried about the impact," he said. "I'm not worried about the (radiation) levels,
   And even after the leak, the project, which employs about 650 people, has strong support in this blue-collar mining town of about 30,000.
   "It is important not only for the community, but it's also extraordinarily important for the country," said John Heaton, a former state senator and chairman of the Carlsbad Nuclear Task Force. "Being able to clean up the complex is important for all of us. It is a defense program. All of us in the country have an obligation to deal with the defense issues, whether it's clean up, whether it's fighting wars or preparing for fighting wars."
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