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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) -- Jeff Skinner scored the go-ahead goal in the second period and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the St. Louis Blues 3-1 on Friday night.
 
Alexander Semin added an empty-netter with 1:04 left and Nathan Gerbe scored on an early power play.
 
They helped the Hurricanes win their fifth in six games to remain in the mix in the crowded Metropolitan Division.
 
David Backes scored on the power play for St. Louis.
 
The Blues, who average 3.36 goals per game, missed a chance to pull even with Chicago atop the Central Division by losing just their fourth game against an Eastern Conference team.
 
Anton Khudobin stopped 26 shots for the Hurricanes.
 
Jaroslav Halak made 28 saves in his fourth straight start, but had his four-game winning streak snapped.
 
Khudobin stopped all 10 shots he faced in the third period, including a nifty leg save on Alex Pietrangelo with about 1 1/2 minutes left.
 
And, he got some help from the goal post after two Blues - Jaden Schwartz and Jay Bouwmeester - each rang it in the final 2 minutes.
 
Semin then tacked on his highlight-reel empty-net goal that capped the Hurricanes' best month in a while.
 
They went 10-4 in January - their most since winning 10 in March 2009 on the way to their most recent playoff appearance.
 
Skinner put Carolina up 2-1 off a draw 1:51 into the second. After Jordan Staal won a faceoff, the puck found Skinner's stick and he beat Halak with a wrist shot from the slot for his seventh goal of the month.
 
That turned out to be enough support for Khudobin, who earned the decision in every game this month for Carolina.
 
He helped the Hurricanes leapfrog idle Columbus and Philadelphia in the division standings, with 59 points. When the night started, only 11 points separated second place from the cellar in the Metropolitan.
 
The Hurricanes never trailed on Friday, taking advantage of some sloppy play early by the Blues - who were whistled for three penalties in the opening 11:25. Carolina went up 1-0 when Gerbe one-timed a slick cross-ice pass from Andrej Sekera 3:46 in.
 
The Blues, who have the league's second-best power-play unit, tied it at 9:23 when Backes beat Khudobin high for his 150th career goal with St. Louis.
 
NOTES: St. Louis finished the month 9-5-0. ... The Blues entered with 37 points on the road, the second-best total in the league, but have not won in Raleigh since 2009. ... Carolina G Cam Ward, out all of January with an unspecified lower-body injury, made a conditioning start Friday night with Charlotte of the AHL.
Friday, 31 January 2014 23:15
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   SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) - Two men arrested along with Missouri wide receiver Dorial Green-Beckham have told police the pound of marijuana found in their car did not belong to the star football player.
   Criminal charges have not been filed after the Springfield native and two friends were arrested in January on suspicion of felony drug distribution. Police say they found the pot and other drug paraphernalia in the trunk of a Jeep Cherokee driven by John McDaniel.
   The Springfield News-Leader reports a probable cause statement shows that Patrick Prouty said he owned the pot but said it was for personal use. McDaniel said he had hidden one gram of marijuana in the car's glove box.
   Green-Beckham was charged in October 2012 with marijuana possession in Columbia and later pleaded guilty to second-degree trespassing.
 
Friday, 31 January 2014 03:38
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The St. Louis Rams are in the market for a new Defensive Coordinator.

 

The team fired current coordinator Tim Walton. Head Coach Jeff Fisher said in a release from the team, “I wish him well in the future.” The search for Walton's replacement could be a short one. Gregg Williams is expected to be hired for the position. Williams was originally hired by the Rams in 2012 to serve as Defensive Coordinator, but was suspended for the season after the NFL found out he ran a bounty program while with the New Orleans Saints.

 

Williams was reinstated last year and served as a consultant for the Tennessee Titans.

Wednesday, 29 January 2014 15:41
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Wednesday, 29 January 2014 08:01
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FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Earnest Ross hadn't won at Arkansas in three attempts, dating back to his first two seasons at Auburn.
 
The Missouri senior picked exactly the right moment to help end his woes in the state on Tuesday night, also putting an end to the Tigers' Bud Walton Arena jinx in the process.
 
Ross' late 3-pointer helped propel Missouri (16-4, 4-3) to a 75-71 win over the Razorbacks — providing a much-needed boost to the Tigers' NCAA tournament hopes.
 
It also helped end an 0-for-6 stretch for Missouri in Bud Walton, dating back to the arena's inaugural 1993-94 season when the two schools were non-conference rivals. Arkansas crushed the Tigers 120-68 on the way to a national championship that first season in its new home — and it hadn't lost to Missouri in the building until Tuesday.
 
"Obviously, it was a great win for us," Missouri coach Frank Haith said. "I thought we showed toughness to come in this building, which is one of the all-time greatest buildings in the country."
 
Ross and Jabari Brown led Missouri with 24 points each, and both were 8 of 8 from the free-throw line — leading the way for a perfect 16 of 16 effort from the foul line in the second half for the Tigers.
 
The free throws were all Missouri needed to seal the win after Ross' 3-pointer that snapped a 64-64 tie. The shot came after an offensive rebound by the Tigers, who out-rebounded Arkansas (13-7, 2-5) 42-26, and it was Jordan Clarkson who drove into the lane before kicking it out to Ross at the top of the key.
 
The senior, who lost twice in Fayetteville before transferring from Auburn to the Tigers — with whom he also lost at Arkansas last season — calmly stroked the shot to put Missouri up 67-64 with 59.4 seconds remaining.
 
Clarkson added 11 points for the Tigers, whose rebounding advantage was led by 12 rebounds from Johnathan Williams.
 
"It feels good just knowing what we practiced all week, and to come out and execute what we did on the practice court in an actual game," Ross said. "I think it's a great reward, and I'm happy we got the win tonight."
 
Ky Madden led the Razorbacks, who have now lost twice at home in conference play, with 20 points.
 
Arkansas was undefeated at home in the SEC last season, but it's now lost two of its last four in Bud Walton Arena — including an overtime loss to Florida on Jan. 14. The Razorbacks had won 25 of their last 26 games in Bud Walton Arena.
 
"It hurts bad," Madden said. "Just not the loss at home, just the loss in conference, period. All losses hurt, but we've just got to continue to fight and get better. That's all we can hope for."
 
Michael Qualls and Bobby Portis each added 16 points for the Razorbacks, whose postseason appears to be slipping away in coach Mike Anderson's third season.
 
Arkansas has won just once on the road in SEC play in each of the last two seasons under Anderson, and it now faces a stretch of three of four games on the road — beginning at LSU on Saturday.
 
"It's kind of unchartered territory for us," Anderson said. "We had done a good job of defending the home court ... I thought they brought more energy, and in the end, they wanted it a little bit more than we did."
 
After struggling to shoot the ball inside for much of the first half, Arkansas came alive early in the second.
 
It did so behind the resurgence of Qualls — the high-flying sophomore who was the team's leading scorer until a shooting slump that began with the start of SEC play. Qualls entered Tuesday 11 of 56 (19.6 percent) in six conference games, but he was 3 of 3 on 3-pointers in the first half.
 
Qualls' fourth 3-pointer of the game put the Razorbacks up 61-60, but Brown answered with back-to-back baskets to put Missouri up 64-61.
 
Madden then tied the game at 64-64 with a three-point play for Arkansas, but Ross had the answer on the other end.
 
"I expect that from (Ross)," Brown said. "I know what kind of player he is ... When I (saw) him hit that shot, you know, I wasn't surprised. That's what he does."
 
Brown, the SEC's leading scorer at 19.5 points per game, started slowly — scoring just five points on 1-of-3 shooting in the first half.
 
However, the junior came alive in the second — hitting three early 3-pointers as Missouri used an 11-0 run to surge ahead 56-46. Brown, who has scored at least 22 points in each of his last five games, connected on back-to-back 3-pointers to cap the Tigers' run.
Tuesday, 28 January 2014 22:18
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ST. LOUIS (AP) -- Alexander Steen gave the St. Louis Blues the early lead and Jaroslav Halak earned his fourth shutout of the season in a 3-0 victory over the New Jersey Devils on Tuesday night.
 
Brenden Morrow added a power-play goal midway through the third period and Maxim Lapierre scored into an empty net with 2:08 left. The Blues have won three straight and moved a point ahead of the Blackhawks, who played later at Calgary, for the Central Division lead.
 
The Blues cleaned up on defense a week after getting whipped 7-1 in New Jersey when Halak surrendered four goals in 14 shots after relieving Brian Elliott. Halak has started all three games since that setback, allowing a total of four goals.
 
The Devils mustered little offensively three days after losing 7-3 to the Rangers at Yankee Stadium. They were shut out for the sixth time, although this was the first time in 35 games.
 
The Blues are an NHL-best 17-3-1 against the Eastern Conference, and 9-0 at home.
 
Steen was the NHL's second-leading goal scorer in late December before missing 11 games with a concussion. He's been back six games and has a point in the last five with three goals and four assists.
 
Halak and Brian Elliott have combined for seven shutouts this season. Halak has won four straight starts with two shutouts this month, and holds the franchise mark with 20 shutouts in four seasons.
 
Morrow deflected a waist-high shot past Cory Schneider for his eighth goal and first point in nine games, capitalizing on a tripping call against Bryce Salvador.
 
St. Louis killed off Roman Polak's high-sticking penalty just nine seconds into the game, and then took the lead on Steen's 27th goal at 3:25. Steen scored his 100th goal in six seasons with St. Louis scoring from the slot on an odd-man rush with assists by Jaden Schwartz and David Backes.
 
Alex Pietrangelo took a holding call foiling a break-in by Stephen Gionta late in the period and, again, the St. Louis penalty killers came through. The Blues' Vladimir Sobotka hit the goal post on an odd-man rush with just under five minutes to go.
 
The Devils played in St. Louis for the first time since Nov. 20, 2010, a 3-2 Blues victory.
 
NOTES: NFL Hall of Famer Dan Dierdorf, who recently retired from broadcasting, wore a Blues jersey with his number 72 while watching from a private box. ... New Jersey is 5-16-3 when trailing after two periods. ... Jaromir Jagr had totaled two goals and four assists the previous four games.
Tuesday, 28 January 2014 22:17
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LONDON (AP) -- Go ahead - just try to get away with it. If you're willing to take the risk, you'll pay the price.

That's the challenge laid down to drug cheats thinking they can dope their way to success at the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

International Olympic and anti-doping officials are implementing the toughest drug-testing program in Winter Games history, using intelligence to target athletes and events considered most at risk.

Authorities are focusing their efforts on weeding out dopers through rigorous pre-games and pre-competition tests. Armed with an improved scientific method that can detect drug use going back months rather than days, the International Olympic Committee will conduct a record number of tests.

Urine and blood samples will be stored for eight years for retroactive testing, providing further deterrence to anyone thinking they can avoid being caught.

"I think it would be stupid to try to cheat," IOC medical director Dr. Richard Budgett told The Associated Press. "If there are any doping cases in Sochi, some of them may be because athletes are being stupid."

The Russian doping lab, which had faced possible suspension by the World Anti-Doping Agency for inadequate procedures, has been fully accredited for the games and will be analyzing samples around the clock.

The Winter Olympics have produced only a small number of positive tests over the years as they involve far fewer athletes than the Summer Games and fewer sports with a record of doping.

Olympic officials hope any cheats will have been screened out already through extensive out-of-competition testing carried out around the globe in the months, weeks and days leading up to the games.

Don't think, though, that nobody's cheating or that Sochi will be doping-free.

"You'd be foolish to write off the Winter Games as having any lesser risk," said Andy Parkinson, chief executive of Britain's national anti-doping agency.

The IOC plans to carry out 2,453 tests in Sochi, including 1,269 pre-competition controls. That's a 57 percent increase in pre-games tests from the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver.

The majority of the 1,184 in-competition tests will be done in sports like cross-country skiing and biathlon, endurance events with a history of blood doping and EPO use. About 20 percent of the doping controls will be blood tests.

Much of the testing will be based on intelligence gathered from law-enforcement agencies, whistle-blowers and previous suspicious blood level results.

The testing program begins on Jan. 30, the day the athletes village opens. From then until the close of the games on Feb. 23, Olympic athletes can be tested at any time and at any place, including training sites anywhere in the world. The games open on Feb. 7.

About 2,000 of the 3,000 athletes competing in Sochi are expected to be tested - some of them two, three or even four times. The top five in all medal events are tested, as well as others chosen at random.

Since testing began at the Winter Olympics in 1968, only 20 doping cases have been reported by the IOC. Only one was reported at the 2010 Vancouver Games, with Polish cross-country skier Kornelia Marek disqualified after testing positive for EPO. Two hockey players were reprimanded for minor violations after testing positive for stimulants.

There was one positive test during the 2006 Turin Games, with Russian biathlete Olga Pyleva stripped of a silver medal.

However, there was a wider doping scandal in Turin. Acting on a tipoff from the IOC, Italian police raided the lodgings of the Austrian cross-country and biathlon team, seizing blood doping equipment. While no Austrians tested positive at the time, four later received life bans from the IOC.

The IOC freezes and stores Olympic samples for eight years at the lab in Lausanne, Switzerland. The samples can be retested when new methods become available. The storage period will be extended to 10 years starting in 2016.

The IOC recently retested 350 samples from the Turin Olympics, but said it will wait until after the Sochi Games to announce the results.

"The rules from Torino say the IOC cannot discuss any details about that until the full doping control process is completed, and it's not completed yet," Budgett said. "What we can say is that it doesn't affect any athletes who are competing in Sochi."

While testing has improved, there remains a loophole in the system: no reliable test exists for detecting the transfusion of an athlete's own blood. Several sports federations, however, have adopted the "biological passport" program, which monitors an athlete's blood parameters over time to detect changes that could indicate doping.

The Olympics come at a sensitive time for Russia, which has a dubious record on doping. Scores of Russian athletes in various sports have tested positive in recent months. A scandal in Sochi would be a huge embarrassment for the host country.

Russia's doping lab has also come under scrutiny, with WADA threatening to suspend the Moscow-based facility late last year unless it improved its procedures. The lab has since passed inspection and has set up a satellite facility in Sochi for the Olympics.

The lab will be staffed by 90 personnel, including 18 international experts appointed by the IOC to help oversee the operations.

The main novelty is the "long-term metabolite" test for steroids, expanding the detection window by weeks or months. The WADA lab in Cologne, Germany, has found hundreds of positive cases with the new test in the past year.

Also in use will be tests for human growth hormone, which had been on hold following challenges to the system for measuring blood limits.

"You can't say there are no cheats," WADA director general David Howman said. "People are having a go where they can, but the risk is heightening and the approach is better.

"We keep saying: `You'd be stupid if you tried to cheat at the Olympics because you're going to be found out.'"

---

Follow Stephen Wilson on Twitter: HTTP://TWITTER.COM/STEVEWILSONAP

--

AP Sports Writer John Leicester in Paris contributed to this report.

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

Tuesday, 28 January 2014 09:16
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Seven years ago, Vladimir Putin traveled all the way to Guatemala to woo Olympic leaders with his grandiose vision: hosting the Winter Games in Russia's little-known Black Sea summer resort of Sochi.

Putin's personal pitch - delivered partly in English and French - did the trick as Sochi beat out bids from South Korea and Austria for the right to stage the 2014 Games on the so-called "Russian Riviera."

Putin's political influence and Russia's might bowled over the International Olympic Committee on that day.

It was a risky choice then and it shapes up as even riskier now.

With the opening ceremony less than two weeks away, Putin's prestige and his country's reputation are at stake - riding on a $51 billion mega-project meant to showcase a modern Russia but overshadowed by a barrage of concerns over terrorism, gay rights, human rights, corruption, waste and overspending.

No other Winter Games has faced such an acute terror threat. No other Winter Olympics has been so engulfed in politics. No other recent Olympics has been so closely associated with one man - Putin, the "captain" of the Sochi team.

Amid a politically charged atmosphere and ominous security climate, can Putin and Russia deliver a safe and successful Olympics? Can Sochi defy the grim predictions and dazzle the world with well-organized games featuring shiny new venues, picturesque mountains and the world's best winter sports athletes?

Lest we forget, the Olympics are also supposed to be about sports and athletes: Alex Ovechkin, Sidney Crosby and other NHL stars competing for their home countries on the hockey rink; snowboard great Shaun White doing new gravity-defying flips and twists; South Korean figure skating queen Yuna Kim performing graceful magic on the ice; American teen sensation Mikaela Shiffrin zipping through the slalom gates.

About 3,000 athletes from more than 80 countries will be competing in 98 medal events. Twelve new events are on the program, with women's ski jumping making its debut after being rejected for inclusion at the 2010 Vancouver Games.

The medals race is likely to be between Norway, the United States, Canada and Germany. The Russians, coming off their worst ever Winter Games in Vancouver, are determined to bounce back on home territory. A gold medal from the Ovechkin-led hockey team would be the ultimate prize for a country that hasn't won the Olympic title since a "Unified Team" of former Soviet republics triumphed in 1992.

"Olympics are probably the most important thing for Russians," Ovechkin said.

Sochi will also offer up its share of human-interest story lines:

- the return of the Jamaican bobsled team for the first time since 2002, rekindling the feel-good story of 1988 that inspired the film "Cool Runnings."

- track and field stars Lolo Jones and Lauryn Williams switching from the Summer Olympics to Winter Games as members of the U.S. women's bobsled team.

- British-based classical-pop musician Vanessa-Mae trading her violin for a pair of skis to compete for Thailand, her father's native country.

- and, yes, those wild and crazy pants worn by the Norwegian men's curling team - red, white and blue zig-zag patterns this time.

For now, the world's focus remains squarely on the terror danger posed by the Islamic insurgency in the Northern Caucasus. An Islamic militant group in Dagestan claimed responsibility for two suicide bombings that killed 34 people in late December in Volgograd and threatened to attack the games in Sochi.

Russian security officials have been hunting for three potential female suicide bombers, one of whom is believed to be in Sochi itself. The suspects are known as "black widows," women seeking to avenge husbands or male relatives killed in Russia's fight against insurgents in the region.

"We know some of them got through the perimeter," said Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the U.S. House Homeland Security Committee. "What we don't know is how many more black widows are out there. ... How many potential cells could be in Sochi and the Olympic Village?"

Russia is mounting what is believed to be the biggest security operation ever for an Olympics, deploying more than 50,000 police and soldiers to protect the games. The cordon includes naval warships, anti-aircraft batteries and drone aircraft. Two U.S. warships will be in the Black Sea to help if needed.

"We will try to make sure that the security measures taken aren't too intrusive or visible and that they won't put pressure on the athletes, guests and journalists," Putin said.

Sochi's preparations have also been clouded by the Western uproar against a Russian law enacted last year that prohibits gay "propaganda" among minors. Critics and gay activists say the law discriminates against homosexuals and could be used against anyone openly supporting gay rights at the games.

Putin has insisted there will be no discrimination of any kind against any athletes or spectators in Sochi, yet his recent comments linking homosexuality and pedophilia have only inflamed the issue.

The IOC, meanwhile, has reminded athletes to comply with "Rule 50" of the Olympic Charter, which forbids protests or political gestures at Olympic venues.

President Barack Obama has seized on the issue by sending a U.S. delegation to Sochi that includes three openly gay members - tennis great Billie Jean King, figure skater Brian Boitano and ice hockey player Caitlin Cahow.

Hoping to show off a resurgent Russia that emerged from the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, organizers have built virtually all Olympic facilities from scratch to turn a decaying, Stalinist-era resort into what they hope will be a year-round tourist destination and winter sports mecca for the region.

Sochi features one of the most compact layouts in Olympic history, with all indoor arenas located close to each other in an Olympic Park along the coast. The cluster of snow venues are about 45 minutes away in the Krasnaya Polyana mountains.

"The venues will be perhaps the most spectacular, the best ever," said senior Norwegian IOC member Gerhard Heiberg, who organized the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer.

The project has come at a monumental cost: the $51 billion price tag, which includes construction of news road, tunnels, rail lines and other long-term infrastructure investments, is a record for any Winter or Summer Games. Billions of dollars have disappeared in kickbacks, embezzlement or mismanagement, critics claim.

"What's not good is all the money that's been spent," said Heiberg, head of the IOC marketing commission. "This could influence very badly cities thinking about bidding for the games."

In spite of all the criticism, IOC members believe the Russians deserve the chance to prove the choice of Sochi was the right one.

"Russia today is not the Soviet Union of 1980," Canadian member Dick Pound said. "They are certainly capable of organizing a Winter Olympics. They have created a winter sports complex out of virtually nothing and they did it in 5-6 years. My guess is they will deliver good games."

---

Follow Stephen Wilson on Twitter: HTTP://TWITTER.COM/STEVEWILSONAP

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED. Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

Monday, 27 January 2014 10:51
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JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) -- Leave it to Peyton Manning to put everything in perspective.

"The Super Bowl is a big deal," the Broncos' record-setting quarterback said Sunday after his team arrived in a frozen Big Apple - well, across the icy Hudson River in New Jersey, actually.

Well, yeah, it's only the biggest sporting event in America, a quasi-national holiday. That's not lost on the four-time NFL MVP and owner of one Super Bowl title.

"I know how hard it is to get here," he added. "I know how much time and sacrifice our team has made in order to have this opportunity to play in this game. We were excited to get on that plane. We were excited getting off that plane, and we are looking forward to being here all week and, hopefully, playing a good game next Sunday."

It will take more than a good game to beat the Seahawks, of course. Seattle brings the stingiest defense in the league to the Super Bowl. It's a juicy matchup between an unstoppable force led by Manning (55 TD passes, 606 points) and an immovable object (231 points allowed, ranked first in overall and passing defense).

And it's exactly what the Seahawks traveled across the country for: the biggest of all challenges.

"Historically, it can't get any tougher," Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. "People can't even dream to have a season (like Manning had). It's an extraordinary challenge, and we'll see how this matchup goes. They have to play us, too."

Plus, both teams might have to fight through the elements in the first outdoor Super Bowl in a cold-weather site.

On Sunday, an icy wind made its way through the Meadowlands, cut across the Hudson and into frigid Manhattan. Looks like Mother Nature is taking seriously the NFL's slogan for this Super Bowl: Best Served Cold.

"Don't let the cold weather get you," is Denver linebacker Wesley Woodyard's mantra. "Once you figure out a point in your mind that you're cold, that's when it gets you. So you just have to block it out and be into the moment."

For the moment, each side is dealing with the distractions that accompany reaching the NFL's super-hyped championship game.

More media, for sure. A glaring spotlight on everything. Spending a week away from home. Practicing in another team's facility: the Seahawks at the Giants' complex across the parking lots from MetLife Stadium, the Broncos at the Jets' place in Florham Park, about 30 minutes from the Meadowlands.

Both coaches, Denver's John Fox and Seattle's Carroll, are concerned about the outdoor practice fields being frozen or covered with snow. Neither sounded eager about working indoors the entire week.

Just another inconvenience that goes along with the Super Bowl, although the NFL said the outdoor fields will be available for practices.

"Cold, hot, snow, rain, football is challenging," Seahawks All-Pro safety Earl Thomas said. "That's why we've got to stay in it (mentally) for the whole game - the personnel, the matchups. It's not about psyching yourself up, it's about the opportunity. You've got the God-given ability and you want to show it off. It doesn't matter where it is."

Where it is, of course, is where every football player seeks to be in early February. Whether the Super Bowl is played on the Meadowlands tundra, in Death Valley or on Mars, every NFL player wants to be suiting up for it.

"I think in order to be a championship football team we've got to be weatherproof, and I think our football team played in all different elements this year," Fox said. "I feel comfortable with where we're at as far as the elements, but it's a part of the game. I think tradition-wise, it's been a part of the league and a part of a lot of championships."

Not one regular Seahawks player has been to this stage, giving Denver something of an edge in experience. The Broncos have four: receiver Wes Welker, tight end Jacob Tamme, cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie and that quarterback named Peyton.

Manning, of course, is the only current Bronco to have won a ring, with Indianapolis in 2007. He also lost the Super Bowl in 2010 with the Colts.

On Monday, with the long travel out of the way and the introductory news conferences behind them, each team gets down to business. They can't wait.

"I don't believe in such a thing called distractions," Woodyard said. "This is the moment we have got to be in. It's what you wanted your whole life."

---

AP NFL website: WWW.PRO32.AP.ORG

© 2014 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. THIS MATERIAL MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST, REWRITTEN OR REDISTRIBUTED.Learn more about our PRIVACY POLICY and TERMS OF USE.

Monday, 27 January 2014 10:49
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