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St. Louis Under A Heat Advisory

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St. Louis Under A Heat Advisory

St. Louis, MO  (KTRS)  The St. Louis area is under a heat advisory. The Natural Weather Service is calling for temperatures to reach close to 100 degrees with heat index values up to 110.This has the St. Louis Health Department  says the combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will likely lead to an increased […]

St. Louis Under A Heat Advisory

St. Louis, MO  (KTRS)  The St. Louis area is under a heat advisory.

The Natural Weather Service is calling for temperatures to reach close to 100 degrees with heat index values up to 110.This has the St. Louis Health Department  says the combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will likely lead to an increased risk of heat-related stress and illness for people and pets, especially for those with out air conditioning. 

The St. Louis Heath Department has released the following tips and information:

Heat Related Health and Safety Tips for People:

Avoid poorly ventilated areas and prolonged work in the sun.
Keep plenty of fluids on hand and try to stay, or take frequent breaks in an air conditioned environment.
Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
Wear light weight loose fitting clothing.
Never leave children unattended in a vehicle. Check the backseat. During extreme heat vehicle temperatures can reach lethal levels in a matter of minutes.
Continuously check on family members, neighbors, elderly, chronically ill, and friends. If they have air conditioning available, encourage them to use it.
Heat Related Health and Safety Tips for Pets:

In extreme heat, it is important that pets are in an air conditioned environment.
Never leave pets alone in a vehicle.

Watch for coolant leaking from your vehicle—a pet drinking just a small amount can cause death.
Do not force your animal to exercise after a meal in hot, humid weather. Limit exercise to the early morning or evening hours.

Never leave your pet standing on asphalt surfaces, as they can burn their paws.

There are numerous heat-related services available for residents:
Cool Down St. Louis is helping area seniors and the disabled with their air-conditioning and utilities; and area low-income households may also apply for utility assistance only, at 314-241-7668, or www.Cooldownstlouis.org.

For information on cooling sites, contact the United Way of Greater St. Louis Information Referral line at 1-800-427-4626 or if calling from a land line phone, dial 2-1-1.

For help with a serious heat related illness, call 911.
Immediately report animals in distress to the St. Louis Citizens’ Service Bureau by calling 314-622-4800 or contact Stray Rescue of St. Louis at 314-771-6121 ext 255

Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke:

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids. The warning signs of heat exhaustion vary, but may include heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, fainting, skin may be cool and moist, pulse rate may be fast and weak, and breathing may be fast and shallow.

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

The warning signs for heat stroke vary but, may include an extremely high body temperature (above 103°F), red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating), rapid, strong pulse, throbbing headache, dizziness, nausea and heat exhaustion.

The heat advisory is in effect Wednesday from noon until 9 p.m.

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